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February 16, 1973 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 16, 1973

a.

U.S.,
By The AP and Reuters
WASHINGTON - The United
States and Cuba yesterday signed
a five-year anti-hijacking pact de-
signed to curb aerial and sea pir-
acy between the two countries.
The agreements went into effect
immediately yesterday morning
at 11:30 a.m. with simultaneous*
signing ceremonies here and in
Havana.
The agreement 'was signed in:
Washington by Secretary of State
William Rogers and initialed, for
Cuba, by the charge d'affaires of
the Czechoslovak' Embassy, Jaro-
slav Zantovsky.
A similar signing ceremony was
held in Cuba, with the United
States represented there by the'
Swiss Government.
- The accord calls for provisions
'for prosecution or'extradition of
persons charged with hijacking a
.plane or a ship and a U. S. pledge

HIJACKINGS BLOCKED
Cuba sign

accord

to enforce its neutrality laws bar-
ring use of American property or
soil to harass Cuba.
It also directs that the hijacked
aircraft or ship and its passengers
and crew be returned without de-
lay and that any funds obtained by
extortion or other illegal means be
returned promptly.
The pact is not retroactive and
will not affect hijackers who al-
ready have fled to one country or
the other.
In addition, the United States
retains its traditional policy of ac-
cepting as a political refugee a
person who arrives without hav-
ing endangered the crew or pas-
sengers of a ship or plane.
The agreement, the first signed
between the two countries since
they severed relations in 1961, ap-
plies to boats as well as aircraft at
Cuba's insistence.

Anti - Castro Cubans have com- vember when he said the Fidel
mandeered a number of small ves- Castro government would have to,
sels in Cuban water and hijacked change its generally hostile atti-
them to Florida. tude toward Washington and stop
The agreement came after three its policy of exporting revolution
months of negotiations following to other hemispheric nations.
two airliner hijackings to Cuba The United States broke rela-
last November. There have been 'tions with Cuba in 1961 over these
87 hijackings of U. S. planes to points and there have been no di-
Cuba in the past 12 years. rect contacts since, although deal-
The result of the negotiations, ings have been conducted through
were described as highly satisfac- other countries.
tory from the U. S. view.
Officials said they achieved the The Michigan Daily, edited and man-I
basic goal of acting against terror- aged by students at the University of
ism without compromising the tra- Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
ditional U. S. psto of acepin l ass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
position accepting igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
actual political refugees. Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
They said the agreement would day through Sunday morning Univer-
be both a real and pyhlg csity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
dpsychologicalcarrier (campus area); $11 local mail
block for hijackers. But in spite (in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
of these benefits, the American of- (other states and foreign).
ficials repeated that the agree- Summer Session published Tuesday I
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-I
ment is considered an opening to tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
better general relations with Cuba. area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
They say President Nixon has Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
not changed his position of last No- states and foreign).

CORNTREE:
a family approach
to childcare
Openings for families
and volunteers
665-0084, 665-2726

FRIDAY
JEAN VIGO
L'ATALANTE
French with subtitles.
1934. Nostalgically poe-
tic story of a river barge
owner and his wife. Fam-
ous for mood, atmos-
phere, "intensity of an

. +'
.,ta
fti
4

a::
'.<:
> '' r
>::

the cardigan infIuonce
on a throe-iec
weekende . .assures
casual chic for spring
Purely packable polyester
doubleknit navy or
green cordigon locket and
pull-on checked pants with
white short sleeve triocetate

.t ; :

SHOPTONIGHT UNTIL 9:00 P.M.

f.

Israelis fight Arabs
in ground, air battles

I

TEL AVIV (Y')-The quiet of the
Middle East was shattered on two
fronts yesterday as ,.Israeli and
Egyptian warplanes battled high
over the Gulf of Suez and Syrian
and Israeli gunners exchanged ar-
tillery fire to the north.
The Israelis claimed they knock-
ed down one Soviet-built MIG21 of
the Egyptian air force. Cairo said
it downed one Israeli jet in the
dogfight in wintry skies above
the gulf that separates the two
hostile. sides.
'the military command in Tel
Aviv said no Israeli plane was hit,
however. The command did not
say what type or how many Israeli
planes were involved.
It was the first aerial clash be-
tween Israel and Egypt in eight

months and only the second since'
the U.S.-sponsored Middle East
cease-fire took effect in August,
1970.
About an hour after the dog-
fight, the Israelis said Syrian ar-
tillerymen opened fire on Israeli
positions in the occupied Golan
Heights, about 324 miles to the
north.
Some of the shells landed near
the Nahal Golan paramilitary set-;
tlement, spokespersons added. Is-
raeli gunners fired backj
No Israeli casualties or damage
were reported. Damascus claimed
two Israeli tanks were destroyed,
against no Syrian casualties or
damage. Tel Aviv denied the Syr-
ian tank claim.

WABX present ... The Incredible.. . The Outrageous
DAN HICKS
AND HIS
HOT LICKS
"Super Hero of 20th Century Music . .."
-Rolling Stone
also special guest star

emotion captured
single apt image."

in

a

' i.'{.c
:;, 4
5 S. ..-
y,,I
''>,x
" 'r ' 4 _ '

2I' CI
4L

blouse, sizes 10-18.
Ensemble, $30.
Ooney Dress Shop a Secofd Floor

. r44..
'af
:'
ti,
'I "A
'4..;V
ft
ft '.4
"'.
4'
" ".*5

BOB SEGER

and his
GROUP

SAT./SUN.
FORMAN
LOVES OF A
BLONDE

SATURDAY, FEB. 17-8:00 P.M.
MASONIC AUDITORIUM
Tickets $4 and $5 at Masonic Aud. B.O., Hudson's and Grinnell's
A GOLDEN GOOSE PRODUCTION

J 4#

i

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

-

LIBERTY AT MAYNARD

$1

7 and 9

Guitar, Flute, Recorder,
Banjo, Drums, Moog Synthesizer
If you would like private or class instruction
for any of these instruments, CALL 769-4980
)l )I 1,4ip I~4ic )K(ot

"BETTER THAN
'THE GODFATHER'!"
-NBC-TV, Chicago
Bronson is impressive as Valachi, delivering a
powerful performance which unquestionably will
put him in the Oscar sweepstakes. His aging from
30 to 62 is done smoothly, both in appearance and
movement and he seems to display a rare under-
standing of the character."-Variety

II

3-36 S. STATE

OPEN MON-SAT. 9:30-9:00

I

Con cen tra tion
Mlee tings

YOU DO N T TURN'

YOUR BACK ON
ONE. ESPECIALLY

ANY-

DAILY of 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 p.m.

T HE PARTNER WHO'S
BACKING YOU UP. In
Ihis business there are no
in Color A Paramount Picture
-SOON-

"Terence Young says Bronson
has the quiet authority of Gary
Cooper and the dynamic pres-
ence of Clark Gable. Agent Paul
Kohner says Bronson reminds
him of Humphrey Bogart. Per-
sor'ally, he's the only throwback
to John Garfield. The movie
may well land Charlie on the
top-ten U.S. box-office list."
-James Bacon,
Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

I

I

01 apers
A W D AgU~I4S p.untsho.A A 7ERENCE YOUNG o
from Co~i.,.,b.P,dw.,0(a

7:00 and 9:15

for second semester sophomores
Again this year the academic departments of the College of LSA are scheduling concentration meetings for sec-
ond semester sophomores who will shortly make decisions about choice of a major. At these meetings represent-
atives of the departments will explain their offerings, requirements, and career possibilities. They will also answer
questions relating to their programs.
Second semester sophomores and others who may wish to have information on department programs are urged to
attend those meetings which pertain to their academic and career goals. All meetings are scheduled to precede
the beginning of advanced classification, so student decisions may be reached before course elections are to be
made.

A

MIDWEST PREMIERE-"LOLLY MADONNA"
CONTINENTAL TYROLEANS
By
DUNHAM'S
Largest selection in
town for guy s
and gals.
BAN KAMERICARO
From $26
DOWNTOWN CAMPUS
217 S. Main St. c 619 E. Liberty
Open Monday iva s Street
and Open Friday
Friday Nights Two Stores Nights
'til 8:30 'til 8:30
THURSDAY and
C1214 s. university FRIDAY at 6:40-9:08
SA MPUSSATURDAY and
SUNDAY at 1:00-3:30-
Theatre6:05-8:45
Academy Award Nomination
BEST PICTURE
and BEST ACTRESS (Liv Ullman)
"A Historical "Stunning
Pagent" ( ~Masterpiece"
-Vincent Canby, --Dick Richards, WHBI
New York Times "Enormous Beauty
"Masterful" and Power"

MIDNIGHT SHOW-Santana, Jefferson Airplane, Byrds
in "Stomping Ground" plus Chap. 3 "Flash Gordon"
see separate ad for details
Sat, and Sun. Matinees "FLASH GORDON" plus Disney
cartoons plus "LIVING FREE" 1:00 p.m.-3: 15 p.m.-75c
761-9700
t
AJACK ROLLINS CHARLES H JOFFEProucton
"ba---9

If

AREA OF CONCENTRATION
Anthro.-Zool.
Bachelor in General Studies

LOCATION

DATE

TIME

Botany
Chemistry
Economics

English
French
German

H istory
Human Nutrition

210 Angell Hall
Rm. 2 Mod. Lang. Bldg.
1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg.
Rm. 3005 Chem. Bldg.
Rm. 101 Econ. Bldg.
2003 A.H.
Rm. 1 Mod. Long. Bldg.
Rm. 101 Mod. Long. Bldg.
429 Mason
Rm. 2 Mod. Lang. Bldg.
202 S. Thayer,
Psycho-Ling. Conf. Rm.
202 S. Thayer,
Psycho-Ling. Conf. Rm.
2235 Angell Hall
2003 Angell Hall
606 Burton Mem. Tower
2408 Mason Hall

11

Individual Concentration
Program
Linguistics

Feb. 19
Feb. 21
Feb. 20
Feb. 20
Feb. 27
Feb. 21
Mar. I
Feb. 14
Feb. 14
Feb. 14
Feb. 16
Feb. 14
Feb. 15
Feb. 16
Feb. 20
Feb. 20
Feb. 15
Feb. 19
Feb. 20
Feb. 20
Er....L 1 d

5:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
1 :00 p.m.
4:10 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.

4

11

Math T.C.

Math
Music

3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
10:30-11:30 a.m.

I

Near Eastern Lang. and Lit.
Philosophy
Political Science
Pre-Medical and Pre-Dentol

429 Mason Hall
Ugli Mul. Pur. Room
Aud. C, Angell Hall
1025 Angell Hall

4:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
. ran r, .

Psychology

I

1111 r'1 I Al 1-7 1jA J 1 -- - -J

i

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