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February 15, 1973 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-15

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;Thursday, February 15, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

..Thursday, February 15, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Sports of The Daily
Seeds...
.. and stems
By DAN BORUS
TODAY'S BILL OF FARE features some short but sweet items
of general sporting interest. None are too heavy and some
are even topical. All are opinionated.
Here they are, you can take your pick.
While You're Waiting..
HOT STOVE LEAGUERS who spent Valentine's Day worrying
that Marvin Miller and Bowie Kuhn send each other brick-
bats can find a small bit of solace in two literary offerings.
After all, if you don't have APBA cards and the real thing is a
long way off, what better way is there to relieve the blahs of a
snowy Ann Arbor day than running down to your local book
dealer and delving into a baseball book or two?
Fortunately, there are a pair of excellent books on
America's (ex?) favorite pastime. This Great Game, a collec-
tion that has a plethora of color pictures, and Roger Angell's
The Summer Game, are perfect for that "OH-OH, maybe
we're going to have a strike/lockout" feeling.
Both are filled with little tidbits that make baseball a great
game. With just a little bit of investigation you can learn what
Willie May's real nickname is and what Moe Drabowsky does for
kicks.
More importntly, the books offer a revealing look into a
sport which is in trouble. The joy of baseball, that joy of waiting
so agonizingly for ahe pitcher to deliver the ball home, with the
bases loaded and two out, is communicated so well.
Part of the decline in baseball's fortunes seem dir etly
attributable to the kind of life we Americans lead. The instant
gratification of football, the hit or miss proposition, is favored
over the "sit and wait" of baseball. Baseball's virtue is that it
retains those qualities of containment and suspense, values
which are sadly missing from American sports pursuits.
Not Again
MARCH IS SWIFTLY APPROACHING and, as all good basket-
ball fans know, it is the month for the UCLA Invitational.
In this campaign UCLA will take its titlebound express to St.
Louis, home of the world's biggest croquet wicket.
Though the teams that arrive in St. Louis will have a
chance to tour the city that is "first in booze, first in shoes
and last in the NFL," exciting basketball will most likely
begin next year.
That is when N.C. State is pardoned for its recruiting sins.
Then basketball of the college variety may well find a legitimate
challenger to UCLA.
That, of course, is old hat. Most round ball fans have figured
it out already. But what is surprising is that good college
basketball seems absent this year.
Oh, there are a couple of good squads. But somehow
nothing impressive has shown up. As of the second week in
January there were only two unbeaten squads and they're
destined to stay that way. Glancing through the top twenty, one
sees few teams of real consistency.
Maryland's "UCLA of the East" has looked at times like "the
staid old men of College Park." Oral Roberts, last year's
phenom, has flashed in the pan. (One is tempted to say God is
on somebody else's side this year.) Florida State seems lost in
a swamp and Missouri has undergone shock therapy.
Usually most coaches secretly forego thoughts at the title
and hope for a good season and a second place finish in the
nation. This year that second place desire has not been prompt in
showing up,
* * '
Those Magic Fifteenr
THIS YEAR THE BIG TEN recently put into effect a very
controversial rule concerning "minor" sport scholarships,
limiting each member institution to fifteen for all sports except
hockey, basketball and football. Scholarships in these sports were
restricted as well. Of course, the full scholarships can be broken
up into thirty half scholarships (a half ride is tuition or room
and board).
Many felt that the Big Ten was banishing itself to per- j
petual mediocrity in "minor sports." But since the conference
as a whole has only one swimming team, one tennis team,
one wrestling and one gymnastics team worthy of national top
ten honors, the argument is unrealistic. Minor sports, with a
few exceptions, is not the Big Ten's forte.
The final result of the rules which were instituted in part for
financial reasons are not yet in. However, some speculations
about the effect can be made.
1). Michigan minor sports will not be fatally touched.

Michigan will most likely benefit from the "winner's image."
An athlete who sees that he won't get a free ride will most
likely come to a school with good coaching and a winning record.
And since by their very nature, "minor" sports, as a general
rule, are played by the some affluent segments.of the country,
Michigan will not be hit as hard as some have prophesized.
It seems that in the world of minor sports the rich will get
richer and the poor will fade to the bottom of the Big Ten.
2). The quality of play at smaller institutions will perhaps
improve. Second line players who in the past were actively
recruited by larger schools and dwelled on the bench will now be
approached by smaller schools like those of the Mid-American
conference.
3). Indiana, for one, will have to make an important
policy decision. Conceivably the Hoosiers could pour all fifteen
into swimming, a sport which they clearly dominate. That would,
of course, leave the rest of their sports program without major
funding for scholarships and the quality could decline. The new
rule may place a large dent in the fortunes of Doc Counselman's
swim hopes . . . or it could harm the gymnasts.
Other schools might follow suit. Illinois may decide to be
strong in, say, wrestling, and forego other sports.
It could get quite exciting in the Big Ten.
.TO Establish Justice. .7!!
PETITIONS NOW ACCEPTED
FOR 10 VACANCIES ON
Central Student Judiciar
(ALL CAMPUS SUPREME COURT)

Ali

wipes out Bugner

By The Associated Press
LAS VEGAS, Nev.-Muhammad
Ali slashed a cut over the left eye
of England's Joe Bugner in the
first round yet went the full 12-
round distance en route to a unani-
mous decision at the Las Vegas
Convention Center last night.
An 8-1 favorite, the former heavy-
weight champion from Cherry Hills,
N.J., found all he could handle in
the 22-year-old European cham-
pion, nine years his junior.
With a crowd of 5,700 including
at least 1,500 from England, Bug-
ner fought sometimes clumsily but
always agressively against Ali.
Bugner never had been cut be-
fore in his 48 professional matches
but All opened a cut over his left
eye in the opening round and work-
ed on it the rest of the way.
Although thie ex-champion land-
ed sharper punches, he failed to
hurt his opponent.
There were no knockdowns but
each fighter drove the other back
on several occasions.
Ali, 31, weighed 217 1/4 pounds
as he won his 41st fight in 42 out-
ings. Bugner, the Hungarian-born,
curly-haired battler from London
suffered only his fifth loss and
weighed in at 219.
Judge Roland Dakin of Eng-
land scored it 57-54, Lou Tabat had
it 56-63 and Judge Ralph Mosa had
it 57-52. The latter two both are

daily
sports

and landed left hooks and rights to
the head but without the power to
do much damage.
Ali finished the fight. He said,
however, that Bugner hurt him in
the seventh round.
"Man, he hit me real good. I

AP Photo
MUHAMMED ALI, former heavyweight champion, leans away from a looping right by European champ
Joe Bugner during their fight in Las Vegas last night. Ali stayed away from Bugner's fists and landed
enough of his own punches to gain a unanimous twelve-round decision.

JABBAR INJURED

Ph lly shocks Bucks,

106-

104 r

was semi-knocked out."
NIGHT EDITOR: The seventh, strangely, was one
GEORGE HASTINGS round all three judges gave to Ali.
In one of his flurry attacks,
Bugner had connected with both
from Las Vegas. The Associated a left and a right and Ali shook
Press had Ali ahead 58-50. his head as the stanza ended.
The live gate was announced at "I'll give him two more years
$298,000 with closed circuit tele- and he'll be the world's heavy-
vision both in the United States weight champion with no trouble,"
and internationally. Ali said.
Bugner was guaranteed his big- Ali praised the foot work of the
gest pay night, approximately determined Britisher and said, "If
$120,000, on a percentage basis. I had listened to those who said
Few in the United States thought this would be an easy fight, I
the European champion would put He is a better fighter than I
up as determined a showing and tHuh eas.etIerdidn'etni
so frequently carrying the fight to thought he was. I didn't know his
Ali. But in the first round Bugner legs were so good. Right now he is
showed a quick, sharp jab and three times better than when I
throughout the fight his mauling trained with him.
rushes kept Ali from setting up a
regulated attack.
Bugner's eye was bruised early SCO tR E S
in the first round and there was a
cut by the end of the stanza. His
corner men worked on it continual-I COLLEGE BASKETBALL
lyrbeween rounds and even though IVinan ova 76, Cansius6
it was about an inch and a half Florida State 83, Jacksonville 74
long by the end of the fight, at no Indiana state 68,Butler 6
time was a doctor - called to Kalamazoo 64, Olivet 63
examine it. Alma 91, Saginaw Valley 72
The rounds were close through- Albion 83, Calvin 82
St. Bonaventure 68,. Xavier, Ohio 63
out and even though the judges Oral Robertst 1l, aI. St. 96
were within a point or two in their Dayton 100, Biscayne 68
ultimate decision in the five point Detroit 83, Bellatinine 69
must system, there was a differ- NSr Caroain 95, MarSand 8
ence in the rounds they scored. NBA
However, all gave the final three Chicago 100,New York 98
to Ali, insuring his victory with his Boston 104, KC-Omaha 101
best round the 11th when he tore. Philadelphia 106, Milwukee 104
into Bugner with a flurry of lefts Pittsburgh 6, Vancouver 2
and rights. Montreal 6, New York Rangers 3
But even in the final stanza, the iutah 117, New York 90
Englishman battled back gallantly Indiana 129, Memphis 125 (OT)
FUTURE TEACHERS
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Whatever your major youl{want to
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i
i
i

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA-The Philadel-
phia 76ers snapped a 20-game los-
ing streak, longest in the history
of the National Basketball Asso-
ciation, as they edged the Mil-
waukee Bucks . 106-104 on a goal
tending basket with 16 seconds left
last night.
The score was tied at 104-104
when rookie Fred Boyd tookta
short jump shot in front of the
basket that was interfered with by
Milwaukee's Dick Cunningham.
Milwaukee played the fourth
quarter without its 7-foot-2 center,
Kareem Abdul Jabbar, who suf-
fered a lower back injury on the
last scrimmage of the third quar-
ter and was taken to Temple Uni-
versity Hospital.
The preliminary report said that
Jabbar suffered an acute lower
back sprain on the right side and
had a muscle snasn. He will un-
dergo X-rays this morning.
This was only the fifth victory
of the season for the 76ers, who
have lost 58 games. It was their
first triumph at home since Dec.
6, when they beat the Kansas City
Kings. They hadn't won a game
since defeating Seattle Jan. 7.
Knicks nudged
NEW YORK - Bob Love led a
balanced Chicago attack with 21
points and Jerry Sloan popped in
a pair of clutch baskets in the
closing minutes as the Bulls ral-
lied for a 100-98 National Basket-
ball Association victory over the
New York Knicks last night.
The Bulls, trailing 53-47 at the
start of the third period, outscored
New York 14-4 midway in the third
period, then Bob Weiss hit six
straight points as Chicago took a
75-73 lead into the final period.
They widened the margin to 92-85
NBA Standings

before Walt Frazier, with 29 points,
and Earl Monroe, with 22, drew
the Knicks back within four'points
with 12 minutes to go.
* * *
Rangers blue
MONTREAL-Henri Richard and
Yvan Cournoyer scored goals 11,
Sorry Charlie!
For those of you diehard wa-
terpolo fans who followed up our
story yesterday by attempting
to reach Charles White, we apol-j
3gize to you and to Charlie for
printing the wrong p h o n e
number. Try againat 761-5832
and happy tanking.
seconds apart igniting a four-goal
first period that boosted the Mon-
treal Canadiens to a 6-3 National
Hockey League victory over the
New York Rangers last night.
The defeat ended a 16-game un-
beaten streak for the Rangers and
dropped second place New York
six points behind Montreal in the
NHL's East Division race.

Richard, captain of the Cana-
diens, started the first period surge
with his seventh goal of the season
with Jacques Laperriere and Bob
Murdoch assisting at 3:26. Then,
Montreal came right back for a
second goal with Cournoyer scor-
ing his 29th of the season, un-.
assisted at 3:37.
* * *
Penguins flap
PITTSBURGH - Six *different
players scored goals for the Pitts-
burgh Penguins as they defeated
Vancouver 6-2 in the National
Hockey League last night, handing
the Canucks their sixth straight
loss.
The Penguins, who snapped a
three-game losing streak, outshot
Vancouver 15-1 in the first 13 min-
utes and led 2-0 on a tipin by
Lowell MacDonald and Nick Har-
baruk's 30-foot slap shot past be-
sieged Vancouver goalie Dunc Wil-
son.
Vancouver sliced the lead to 2-11
at 16:08 when Don Tannahill

swiped a pass and slammed a 35-
footer past Penguin goalie Jim
Rutherford.
* * *
Sabres sharp
TORONTO - Rene Robert's 34th
goal of the season proved to be the
winner last night as the Buffalo
Sabres edged the Toronto Maple
Leafs 3-2 in a Natonal Hockey
League game.
Rookie Hugh Harris had snapped
a 1-1 tie with his 12th goal of the
season with less than five minutes
left in the second period. Then
Robert connected in the third for'
a 3-1 Sabre lead before Rick Kehoe
narrowed the edge for the Leafs.
FREE IEN STRucTrot
UN ION '-9 PM

0

I

"Indecently fur
-N.Y. TIMES
AJACK ROLLINS -
Produ
Iwe%
"4-r
Dl i

iny !"
CHARLES H JOFFE
ens
COLOR by DeLuxe
A~hsft

I

__ _

EUROP

1973 SUMMER FLIGHTS
0 FULL DINNER WITH WINE 0 CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 9 COMPLIMEN-

United

TARY FRUITS, SNACKS
PRIVILEGES DEPOSIT
STOP JET

0 COMPLIMENTARY OPEN BAR 0 CANCELLATION
HOLDS SEAT " FINANCING ARRANGEMENTS 0 NON-

FRIDAY
SATURDAY
MLB'3 7-E

Boston
New York
Buffalo
Philadelph
Baltimore
Atlanta
Houston
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Chicago
K.C.-Omah
Detroit
Los Angele
Golden St
Phoenix
Seattle
Portland

Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pct. GB
47 12 .797 -
46 16 .742 21l
18 41 .305 29
ia 5 58 .079 44
Central Division
37 20 .649 -
34 28 .548 51
23 37 .383 1514
21 38 .356 17
Western Conference
Midwest Division
42 19 .688 -
36 23 .610 5
a 31 34 .477 13
26 33 .441 15
Pacific Division
s 46 13 .780 -
tate 37 22 .627 9
28 30 .483 171,/
19 43 .306328
15 44 .254 31

8:30-10 p.m.

also Pier Poolo Posolini's
DCameron
"uninhibited and joyful . .. beautiful, uproarious
panorama of early Renaissance life." TIMES
MLB 4 7:30 & 9:30 $1.25 ($2 double-feature

$1.25 Friends of Newsreel

Dates
5/3-6/5
5/4-6/22
5/11-6/26
5/17-8/12
5/23-7/3
5/30-7/30
6/3-7/7
6/10-8/12
6/18-7/16
6/27-8/30
7/1-8/1
7/7-8/14
7/3-9/4
7/8-7/26
7/15-8/29
7/22-8/26
8/1-8/30
8/14-9/6
8/30
5/15-7/3
5/27-8/15
6/20-7/23
7/9-8/2
7/1 8-8/31
8/7-9/4
8/26-9/5

Routing
D/Bru/D
D/Par/D
D/Bru/Par/D
D/Bru/D
D/Bru/D
D/Ams/D
D/Bru/D
D/Bru/Par/D
D/Ams/Lon/D
D/Ams/Par/D
D/Ams/Lon/D
D/Ams/D
D/Bru/D
D/Bru/Lon/D
D/Bru/Ams/D
D/Par/D
D/Ams/Lon/D
D/Par/D
D/Ams
NY/Ams/NY
NY/Ams/
Lon/NY
NY/Ams/NY
NY/Ams/
Par/NY
NY/Par/NY
NY/Ams/NY
NY/Bru/NY

Carrier (s)
SAB
AF
SAB/AF
SAB
SAB
MAR
SAB
SAB/AF
ONA
MAR/AF
ONA
MAR
SAB
SAB/ONA
SAB/MAR
AF
ONA
AF
MAR
ONA/MAR
ONA
MAR
MAR/AF
AF
MAR
SAB

Air-
Craft
DC-8
B-707
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC- 8
B-707
DC-8
B-707
DC-8
DC-8
DC -8
DC-8
DC-8
B-707
DC-8
DC-8

Seats
180
164
180
180
180
180
180
180
250
180
252
180
180
180
180
164
252
164
180
250
252
180
1 80
164
180
180

Cost
$170
$175
$175
$200
$170
$200
$175
$210
$205
$210
$210
$210
$210
$200
$210
$210
$210
$210
$100
$160
$170
$170
$175
$175
$170
$170

Admin.
Chrge.
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20

Total
$190
$195
$195
$220
$190
$220
$195
$230
$225
$230
$230
$230
$230
$220
$230
$230
$230
$230
$120
$180
$190
$190
$195
$195
$190
$190

TONITE
Lost Showing

0

"Magic
Christian
please
stand.

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