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February 14, 1973 - Image 10

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-14

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Rage Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February 14, 1973

Page Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, February 14, 1973

Asst. manager hits Kay Baum
with racial discrimination suit

Valentine's Day is for
hearts, flowers, cupids

By SUE SOMMER
Charging she was denied promo-
tion because she is black, Elaine
Coleman has filed a complaint of
racial discrimination against Kay
Baum, Inc.
The complaint, filed with the city
Human Rights Commission and the
Michigan Civil Rights Commission,
focuses on the appointment of a
new manager at the local Kay
Baum store, 500 E. Liberty.
Coleman has served as assistant
manager of the store for four and

one half years and has worked
there a total of five and one half
years.
Yet, Kay Baum Vice President
A a r o n Kirschenbaum bypassed
Coleman recently in appointing
Debbie Johnson to fill a vacant
managerial post.
Kirschenbaum denies, however,
that race had anything to do with
the decision.
"Promotion," he says, "is based
solely on ability, education, work-
ing experience and our business

(Continued from Page 1)
judgment as to the best person for with the holiday adding onto it
the job. the superstition that the first per-
"We do not discriminate," he son of the opposite sex seen on
continues, "and n e v e r have." Valentine's morn, became one's
Kirschenbaum adds that work ex- Valentine. The first girl or boy to
perience is not necessarily judged say "Good morrow, 'tis Saint Val-
solely on the amount of time on entine's Day," wduld receive a
the job. gift from the other.
Kirschenbaum's new manager- Those who didn't want to leave
Johnson-is a University graduate things to chance would simply ar-
and was employed at Kay Baum's range to meet a lover early in the
Grosse Pointe store for four years morning. Some young women
before being transferred to Ann closed their eyes, hid, or looked'
Arbor two and one half months away until their suitor came.
before her appointment. Others simply stayedsinbed.
In Coleman's complaint, she Other customs connected with
In Colemanscmne the day were even more bizzare.sd
claims Kirschenbaum first notifiedthdaweevnmoebzr.
her that she had been promoted; On St. Valentine's Eve, girls used
for a six month trial period with to pin six bay leaves to their pil-
Johnson as her assistant; then, lows, eat a hard-boiled egg with the
five days later informed her that shell, and hope to dream of their
Johnson was to be manager and future husbands. Others fixed
she was to remain assistant man- "dumb" cake (made w i t h o u t
ser. sIrspeaking), ascended the stairs
Ihgir.g g backwards, and slept with the cake
"I h no idea what is going to under their pillow.
happen," Coleman says, but she The tradition of the Valentine
adds the case will be brought to card came later, with cards before
court if necessary. the 1800s being exclusively hand-
Kay Baum, Inc. is at present'in made.
the process of replying to both the Books called "Valentine Writers"
city and state commissions. provided amateur artists with lofty

verses to express their love.
The Victorian Era was the golden
age of Valentines. Feathers, beads,
sea shells, ribbons and lace be-
decked commercial Valentines of
the period.
Although today's mass-produced
Valentine lacks the frills and orna-
ments of cards of yesteryear, there
is always the option of making
your own.
Be creative! Libraries still con-
tain copies of Hymen's "Rhapso-
dies on Lover's Themes," with
which to surprise your lady love.
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music.
drama, dance, film,
or writing feature
stories a b aou t the
arts: Contact Arta
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

I 0<=>0<=>X=>O<=>=>X
A BORDERS SPECIAL!
~~vi}
vINM OK-YOU'RE OK
By T HOMAS HARR IS M.D.-~
L ist Price : 5.95 O
SPECIALICE: 4 08
yOBORDERS BOOK SHOP
316 S. STATE
Open Mon.-Sat.
8:4 am.to10pm

WE HELP WITH TENANT-LANDLORD PROBLEMS
The Tenants Union Offers Its Members:
LEGAL SERVICES:
" LEASE READING
* USING ALL YOUR RIGHTS AS A TENANT
" SMALL CLAIMS COURT INFORMATION
LOW COST LEGAL REPRESENTATION
" EVICTIONS,
" DAMAGE DEPOSIT RECOVERY
NEGOTIATION WITH LANDLORDS
LOW COST

t

City seeks out scofflaws

(Continued from Page 1)
Goebel says it is a "rule of
thumb" that officers not collect
past nine at night, but adds, "if
we find it very difficult to get in
touch with people during the day,
or if a large amount is involved,
we'll have to use logic in the situ-
ation."
Wechsler believes that police
have "more important things to
do than act as tax collectors."
Her political counterpart, Coun-
cilman Jerry DeGrieck (HRP-1st
Ward), stresses the fact that the
city was not enforcing parking
violations as "productive punish-
ment" but only for the money.
Mayor Harris who backed the
stiffened program, admits the mon-
ey was indeed the crucial element.
"If there was another way of col-

lecting money that was ethical and
legal, I'd support it much more,"
he says.
Harris says the city did not have
a "great interest in punishing peo-
ple," but that the $200,000 gap just
could not be made up from reve-
nue sharing funds. "We'd have no
new programs at all."
The income goes into the city's
General Fund, from which it is
applied to various city programs.
Both Sheehan and Harris, cast-
ing glances at last year's perform-
ance, are optimistic about the pro-
grams effectiveness. "I think a
great deal of the deficit can be
made up," Harris says.
Sheehan comments that "before
June last year, the budget was in
good shape and a substantial in-
crease in revenue had been accom-
plished." __

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MOVING
REPAIRS
PAINTING
INSPECTING

We Collect Information on Landlords and More
1528 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG.
761-1225-2-5 M-F
YEAR MEMBERSHIP $10

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1973 WORLD'S FAIR MEETING
h Wed., Feb. 14, 19731,8:00 p.
at RIVE GAUCHE (1024 Hill St.)
ALL NATIONALITY CLUBS AND INTERESTED
<+' PERSONS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
World's Fair Committee
y 4'y,"

OPEN MEETING
THURSDAY, FEB. 15-7:00 p.m.
U.A.C. OFFICE, 2nd FLOOR UNION
FOR PLANNING:

a.
sI

Future Worlds Conference
April 13, 14, 15

Festival

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