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February 13, 1973 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-13

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Tuesday, February 13, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Tuesday, February 13, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

r... .._ior

I t ftGt l 3

worth

Hoosiers

Unsu per Campy...
.. .turns fans cool

upend

Illinois

Randy Phillips -

SUPERSTARS COME AND GO, and some just don't quite
arrive. So it's been so far with Michigan's number two cage
star, Campy Russell.
Through the non-conference schedule and over the majority
of the Big xTen portion of his first varsity campaign, the touted
Pontiac Central whiz kid has certainly not achieved the super-
star status expected of him.
Maybe the Sports Illustrated Cover Boy bug has hit again.
Perhaps Campy is just not the player everyone has said he is.
It is possible that over publicity has marked Russell's play; he
could be pressing too much to try and live up to his press
clippings, or he could just be having his troubles with the tough
Big Ten forwards.
Actually, it's been a combination of all of the above-
except of course the legendary SI curse-that has made Russell's
performances merely mortal. Campy is not the answer to
Michigan's prayers-he's not a great shooter and he's not a
super player. He's just a very good one with potential to get
even better.
Mind you, Campy is good. Just look at his 17.7 average
and 10 rebounds per game in Big Ten play. But he is also
shooting poorly (41.6%), taking bad shots, making costly turn-
overs, and occasionally not moving on offense or defense.
Assistant Dick Honig, who coached Campy through a brilliant
freshman campaign, admits, "He hasn't destroyed anybody by
his play. He's supposed to be a superstar, but he's not at that
stage, yet."
Take Campy's shooting. He seems to try an unusually large
percentage of his shots from far out. Yet, at the season's outset
Coach Johnny Orr called Campy's inside moves his most potent
weapon. Campy has realized his infrequent penetration.
"I've noticed it, but I'll get the ball outside most of the
time," he responded.
Big Ten refsmay have discouraged Campy from going
inside. Last year the "in" violations were travelling and
three seconds. This season it's in to call offensive fouls-
especially after driving lay-ups.
Even so, a good player is not discouraged long, and with
constant movement and a Henry Wilmore for opponents to guard,
Russell should be getting to the basket more.
Campy is not a bad shooter. In fact, he is quite good from
the corner and top of the circle. He shot over 50% last year,
though admittedly against shorter and less talented people. But
if you aren't active, you don't get open for passes or shots, and
if you don't get open you tend to force shots. Combine a lack of
movement with a host of tough front line customers to shoot
against and you get a bad percentage.
At the start of the year Campy just didn't seem to hustle
much. Perhaps all those press clippings gave him the im-
pression he could just walk out on the court and score 30
points a game. He's since learned otherwise. Now Russell is
hustling more, moving more, and playing better. But he is
still not consistent. Honig says, "He's just trying too hard."
Against Indiana, Campy was booed by the crowd for bad
play. He scored but four points in that crucial match and Orr sat
him down several times. Campy insists that the boos were not
directed at him.
"I don't think the fans were booing me; they might have
been booing the team," he defended.
But each time Campy was motioned to the bench the crowd
reacted positively. Each time Campy returned to action the boos
began again. That looks to me to be a reaction to Campy, not
the team.
Campy, as other players, has not been enthralled by the
"boisterous" Crisler Arena crowds. He commented, "I don't
really care what the fans think. The fans that come to the
game are really old fashioned; they're so conservative."
"They sit there like they're watching a game on T.V.," he
added. "Maybe they're all trying to analyze the basketball game.
Most people think they're great basketball fans, but I don't think
so."
The fans have been a little unfair at times, but they do
deserve a full 40 minutes from their team and players, and if a
player is not giving it to them, complaints are justified. But to
boo a player simply for a bad performance-that's bush league.
In the Indiana contest Orr kept putting Campy back in to the
fans' chagrin, but he had to play the percentages, and hope
Campy would break out of his tailspin. Despite a stellar sub
job by John Lockard, a hot Campy is better than a hot Lockard.
Campy was moving, but the shots were just not falling, and that's
no cause for boos. When Russell or anyone stands around and
expects to be fed the ball or decides against hustling after loose
balls then a crowd reaction is called for.
Fans, this one included, read press clippings, magazines, and
listen to the local gossip. We build up high expectations also.
I guess we just expected to'l much of Campy too soon.
Few expected Wilmore to blossom as he did-he didn't get
all the ink Campy did. And just maybe the crowds have been
a bit more critical of their wonder worker than their favorite
Wilmore. Every mistake by Campy gets noticed and regis-
tered; for Wilmore a miscue is easily forgotten. He seems to
always make amends.
True, some of Russell's blunders have been, critical-like a
ball stolen at the end of the Purdue game to give the Boilermakers
a last shot for victory. But few people remember how Campy
sparked the Wolverines to an early lead.
Honig says, "Everytime he makes a mistake they think, well,
he shouldn't do that. He's supposed to be a superstar."

The truth is that Campy has not played consistently well, and
he has yet to play a game where he has put it all together. And
as a result he has fallen from favor in the eyes of many fans-
Wilmore is still the main man. This is true not only because of
point totals, but Wilmore seems to have that little extra hustle,
that intense drive, that Campy lacks.
Campy's still got two years to gain superstar status, and he
may yet get there. He believes he has played well this year.
"I've done as well as I can. I think I've done a good job."
So he has, but it's not the job many of us were giver good
reason to expect. Maybe if we stop expecting so much, the next
two years will be a pleasant surprise.

By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Steve!
Downing poured in 41 points and,
John Ritter added 21 last night,
leading 11th-ranked Indiana to an
87-66 Big Ten basketball victory!
over Illinois.
The victory ended a two-gameI
losing string and pushed the
Hoosiers back into the conference
lead with a 7-2 record. Illinois fell
to 4-3.
The Hoosiers dominated the en-
tire game, taking a 39-33 halftime
lead. Then, easily breaking an
Illinois zone defense, Indiana wid-
ened its lead to 22 points midway
through the final period.
Indiana coasted home after that,
GYMNASTS LOSE
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. -
Penn State defeated Michigan
in a dual gymnastics meet last
n i g h t 166.35-163.2, setting a
school scoring record in the
process. The Wolverines did,
however, record their highest
total of the year. Monty Falb
had a 9.45 on the rings and
Ward Black received a 9.4 in
floor exercise to lead Michigan.

t
{
1

dailly
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
RICH STUCK

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10 other Hawkeyes who have Gregorio scored 23 points and
reached 1,000 points in their U of I Marvin Barnes hit for 20 while
basketball careers. grabbing 22 rebounds last night
The game was tied four times, as Providence's eighth-ranked bas-
all in the first half, but the Hawk- ketball team whipped Cleveland
eyes held a 45-42 halftime edge. State 113-79.
The final outcome was at the Cleveland State managed to stay
free throw line in the second half close for 10 minutes, trailing 23-20,
as the Buckeyes hit on 14 of 15 to but the powerful Friars opened up
Iowa's three of nine. Ohio State and raced to a 53-36 halftime ad-
was good for 30 of 35 free throws vantage.
during the game. Providence Coach Dave Gavitt
* * * pulled his starters midway through
the second half and reserves fin-
Friars win ished off the Friars 17th victory
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Ernie Di- in 19 games.

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Campy sweeps the boards

with the substitutes entering the
game with about three minutes to
go.
Nick Weatherspoon, w i t h 24
points, provided Illinois' only scor-
ing punch.
The Hoosiers, now 15-4 overall,
will play at fourth-ranked Minne-
sota Saturday night.'The def end-
ing champion Gophers are 5-2.
Illinois, now 10-7 overall, will
entertain Ohio State Saturday.
Iowa bucked
IOWA CITY - A 24-point per-
formance by Alan Hornyak and
hot free throw shooting paced Ohio
State to an 86-80 Big Ten Confer-
ence basketball victory over Iowa
here last night.
Hornyak, the conference's lead-
ing scorer, hit 50 per cent of his
field goal attempts and eight of 12
free throws as Ohio State. came
from behind four times in the sec-
ond half to register its 10 victory
aginst eight defeats.
The Buckeyes evened their con-
ference mark at 4-4. Iowa fell to
9-9 and 2-6.
Iowa's seven-foot center Kevin
Kunnert led all scorers with 31
points, hitting 13 of 22 from the
field and five of seven from the
free throw line.
Kunnert's first field goal placed
the former Dubuque prep among
.*
Big Ten
Standings

I

INDIANA MEET HELPS

Tan kers
By BOB SIMON!
Last Saturday's defeat at the
hands of the Indiana swim team
was a surprise to no one, includ-
ing even the most optimistic tank-
er. After all, the Hoosiers wentj
into the meet with the fastest times
in the nation in several events. In
a couple of events Indiana had
three swimmers who had gone1
faster than any Wolverine ever
was able to go.
"This is the nest team Indianai
has ever had," according to Mich-
igan coach Gus Stager. "Even
without Spitz they are better than
last year." Despite all this har-
angue over Doc Counsilman's crew
though, Michigan's tankers cer-
tainly didn't and haven't disgraced
themselves.
The meet last weekend was
definitely closer than most peo-
ple had anticipated it would be.
Michigan had gone through the
season beating almost all oppo-
nents by doubling their score.
The tankers had gone through
seven dual meets in this fashion
and now it seemed that Mich-
igan was destined for a dose of
its own medicine.
To be sure the tankers did lose,
but the difference inrtalent be-
tween the two squads was not in-
dicated by the "sway the meet
went" and the final score, 73-50.
The score was tied at 29-29 and
the. meet was still undecided when;
Indiana's John Kinsella and Mike
Halladay took to the blocks for the
500-yard freestyle race, third from
the last event of the meet.
Ther e were also somegreat in-,
dividual races between inenbers
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Missouri 64, Oklahoma 62
Alabama 78, Georgia 67
Austin Peay 96, Morehead 83
Creighton 76, Colorado 67
ABA
Carolina 118, Dallas 111
Indiana 127, Virginia 119, ot.
WHA
Cleveland 8, New York 2
THURS., FEBRUARY 15
I v *
FRE E IN STRUCT10N
UN I ON '7-9 PM

build

stire ngth

i . }

This Week in Sports
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-Minnesota, at Minnesota
WRESTLING-Wisconsin, at Wisconsin
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-Northwestern, at Crisler Arena, 2;00 p.m.
HOCKEY-Minnesota, at Minnesota
SWIMMING-Ohio State, at Matt Mann Pool, 4:00 p.m.
TRACK-Michigan State at Yost Field House, 4:00 p.m.

I

of the opposing swim teams as the
tankers refused to slow down in
awe of the Olympically lpopulated
Hoosier squad.
The highlight of the meet, of
course, was the confrontation be-
tween Michigan's heralded fresh-
man, Tom Szuba and the nation's!
best, Olympian Gary Hall. Almost
3000 screaming fans were on their
feet as the two swimmers swam
neck and neck, first one taking a
small lead and then the other. The
pair touched together as they start-
ed out for the final 100 yards of the
400-yard medley race.
The two freestyled together for
more than SO yards, never more
than a yard apart. With less
than two lengths of the pool re-
maining, it became somewhat
apparent that Hall's slim lead
would never be dissipated as
Szuba was physically spent. Hall
made the final touch less than
two seconds before Szuba in a
race that took more than four
minutes to complete.
If only another miracle would
come about the Wolverines cer-

tainly would become feared. Jose{
Aranha, one of Michigan's two top
sprinters, could beat anyone if his
turns and starts were nearly as
good as his stroke.
The divers efforts for the season
and on Saturday should not be
slighted, for against Indiana, es-
pecially, they are the ones who
kept Michigan in the meet. Joe
Crawford has been consistently
spectacular as he took first off
both the low and high boards
against the Hoosiers. Dick Quint
has been improving steadily
throughout the year and seems to
have overcome his disgust with
bad dives so he is able to come
back with a great one. Steve Sch-
enthal and Quint took seconds in
the two diving events in the In-
diana meet.
If the diving continues to go this
way for the Wolverines and if
Coach Stager can pull off a few
major miracles with his swimmers,
Michigan will be tougher than ever.
The once optimistic view of a fifth
in the NCAA's may well come
about.

Indiana
Purdue
Minnesota
Illinois
MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Iowa
Northwestern

W
7
6
5
4
5
4
3
3
2
1

L
2
2
2
3
4
4
5
6
6
6

Pct.
.778
.750
.714
.572
.555
.500
.375
.333
.250
.143

AP Photo
Legow leads
Elliot Legow (left, funny hat), cackles back over his shoider as
he burns by all opposition for the Daily Libels during yesterday's
third heat of the Greater Escanaba Snowmobile Sweepstakes. The
Libels swept all six heats to cop the prized Coffee Cup.

I

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Last night's results
Indiana 87, Illinois 66
Ohio State 86, Iowa 80
Saturday's games
Northwestern at MICHIGAN
Indiana at Minnesota
Purdue at Michigan State
Ohio State at Illinois
Wisconsin at Iowa
A JOYFUL SPECIAL O
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"The Knowledge Most Worth
Having: Does Distribution
Provide It?"r
Discuss this question with the
Graduation Requirements Commission
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14-8:00 P.M.

LSA Students

0

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MODERN LANGUAGES BLDG., NO.

I

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Discussion Leader:
Herbert Paper,
Prof. of Linguistics

I

Have Your Degree and Don'i Know Which Way to Got

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Protestant Minister
Member crew shin "Exodus"

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