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February 11, 1973 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1973-02-11

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Page Efghfi

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 11, 1973

Page Eighi~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, February 11, 1973

olverines
By MARC FELDMAN disappear with a series of defeats point
Rising like a phoenix from the in recent games and serious knee senio
ashes, the Michigan basketball injuries to Greg Buss and John on th
team got back on the winning track Lockard, played with "great de- I verte
after three straight losses with an termination," a c c o r d i n g to a State
exciting 97-81 thrashing of the pleased Coach Johnny Orr. neath
Michigan State Spartans at Crisler "Henry gave us a super effort The
Arena yesterday afternoon. today after his flat game at Illinois drive
Leading the resurgent offense last weekend. This was the best tans
and potent fast break for the Wol- he's moved since that knee injury long
verines was the irrepressible Henry last year," Orr bubbled. Wilmore to us
Wilmore who scored a season high repeatedly brought the crowd at
of 34 points and grabbed 13 re- Crisler to its collective feet with TW
bounds in directing Michigan to his whirling dervish layups, re- Wilm
by far its best offensive display bounding, and floor generalship. dribb
of the Big Ten season. thel

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97 mm) 1

Michigan, which saw its confer-
ence title hopes and bench nearly
Buinsrip
BOSTON (')-Veteran Mike Wal-
ton scored three goals in the first
period and the Boston Bruins went
on to a 6-3 victory over the Pitts-
burg Penguins yesterday in a
brawling National Hockey League
game.
Walton, recently returned from
the injured list, scored his 22nd
goal at 1:23 of the opening period
and then:converted a pass from
Bobby Orr to make it 2-0 37 seconds
later.
After Pittsburgh's Greg Polis
scored while the Bruins were two-
men short, Walton stole the puck
deep in the Penguin zone and scor-
ed his third goal at 13: 28.
The Bruins nailed down the vic-
tory on goals by Phil Esposito, Orr
and Wayne Cashman in the second
period. Lowell MacDonald had two
goals for Pittsburgh in the same
session.
The game was marked by sev-
eral brawls with referee Dave
Newell handing out 19 penalties
totalling 92 minutes. The penalties
included eight majors for fighting
and two game misconducts against
the Bruins,
Veteran Derek Sanderson, who
jumped Boston's defending Stanley
Cup champions to accept a fat
contract with Philadelphia in the
World Hockey Association, made
his 1972-73 season debut with the
Bruins. He settled his contract and
obtained his release from the
Blazers last month and resigned
with the Bruins four days ago.
Sanderson, who has not played
in a game since Nov. 1, was used
for spot duty by new Coach Bep
Guidolin. He played a total of 12
minutes and 20 seconds, killing
.penalties, seeing brief duty on one
power play and taking a couple
of turns at center.

WILMORE WAS by no means a
one man show for Michigan as
Wayman Britt, who had scored!
four points this season in abbre-j
viated action, and C.J. Kupec corn- j
bined for 26 points on 12 of 18|
shooting to give the Wolverines
that needed spark to defeat the
Spartans.
Britt, a 6-2 freshman guard from
Flint, got the starting nod over Joe
_'Johnson and made the most of his
t maiden opportunity, scoring 12
points and handing out cix assists,
while earning the respect of thej
fans and praise from Orr.
"Britt did a great job for us.
He's a great competitor and he's
going to be an excellenit player."
Kupec brilliant
1 Kupec, who also playei1 a ~piv0-
tal role for Michigan, netted seven
of ten attempts, the mawority long
bombs. Although he stands 6-8 and
is the Wolverines tor substitute
at center, Kupec is Pobably Mich-
igan's best pure sho}ter, and his
- marksmanship was responsible for
loosening up the Spartan zone un-
derneath.
Although the Spartans led just
once (11-10), Gus Ganakas' team
stayedswith the fast-breaking Wol
verinies most of the way with their
_ own run-and-gun offense. Mikc
Robinson, who Orr describes as "a
great offensive player," gunned for
28 points, three above his 25 point
norm.
Michigan had taken a 73-67 lead
midway through the second half
on a jumper by Britt from the top
of the key before Robinson went
on one of his scoring spurts. The
5-11 leaper pumped in seven
straight unanswered points to pull
MSU into a 73-73 tie with 7:34 to
go.
MICHIGAN MOVED out to a
six point lead on two foul shots by
Campy Russell but Robinson's driv-
ing layup narrowed the Wolverine
lead to 83-79 with 4:48 left. At ibis
Zpoint, the always apprehensiv1e
Michiganfanswere set for an-
other down to the wire game out
MSU folded up and the Wolverines
scored 14 consecutive points to
wrap up the contest.
Wilmore ignites
Wilmore incited the rally with a
jump shot and on Michigan's next
possession Spartan Smith hacked
Russell for his fifth personal foul
and disqualification as Russell'
canned the charity tosses.
Smith had played an important
role in both the scoring and re-
bounding columns with 20 big

point
strea
and
a tip
On
two
tans
last
Th
domi
ison
gore,
Spar
6-7 c
Wolv
Ten
year,
to g
Smit
IN
Mich
nate
tion.
ing
sped
Mich
leagt
are
neap
help
west
know

s and ten caroms. The 6-5
r from Chicago was a terror
he offensive boards as he co -
ed many missed Mihigan
shots into easy buckets under-
h.
e Wolverines were now in the
er's seat and the harried Spar-
were forced to shoot from
range as Michigan continued
e the fast break effectively.
VICE IN THE closing spurt
pore rebounded a Spartan miss,
bled out of the pack and drove
length of the court for two
ers. In Michigan's 14 point
k, Wilmore scored 6, Britt 4,
Bill Ayler leaped skyward for
'M' hopes raised
ly Bill Glover's basket with
seconds left saved the Spar-
from going scoreless for the
4:48 of the contest.
e Michigan State attack was
nated by the trio of Mike Rob-
rAllen Smith, and Bill Kil-
whoecombined for 66 of the
tans' 81 points. Kilgore, the
center who always gives the
erines fits and led the Big
in field goal accuracy last
had 18 points and 14 rebounds
go with Robinson's 28 and
h's 21.
CREDIBLE AS it may seem,
igan is not completely elimi-
d from Big Ten title considera-
With Indiana and Illinois fall-
to Purdue and Wisconsin, re-
tively in yesterday's action.
igan is just 11 games off the
tie lead. Although the chances
still slim, a victory in M-in.
olis in two weeks, and a little
from also-rans like North-
ern and Wisconsin, and who
vs?
parCtans spiked!
MICHIGAN

Dailv Photo by DENNY GAINER
"We're just gonna go out and try as hard as we can to win. And I think people are gonna see this for
the next five games. I've got five more good ones coming."-HENRY WILMORE

Russell
E. Johnson
Brady
Britt
Wilmore
Kupec
J. Johnson
Whitten
Ayler
Schinnerer
Kuzma
Rogers
TEAM
Totals

FG FT R
5-15 4-4 13
6-12 1-2 4
3-4 0-2 4
5-8 2-2 3
13-30 8-10 13
7-10 0-0 5
1-3 0-0 1
0-0 0-0 0
1-1 0-0 1
0-0 0-0 0
0-0 0-0 0
'0-0 0-0 0
11
41-83 15-20 55

P TP
1 14
2 13
4 6
1 12
1 34
1 14
1 2
0 0
0 2
0 0

GOPHERS NIP BUCKS

Boiler4
fly The Associatd Press,

S

blast

0 o WEST LAFAYETTE - Purdue's
0 0 Dennis Gamauf scored 22 points
and the unranked Boilermakers
11 97 moved into a tie for first place in
the Big Ten yesterday with a 72-
59 upset over fourth-ranked In-
P TP diana.

MICHIGAN STATE

Smith
Milton
Kilgore
Ganakas
Robinson 7
Furlow
Hairst on
White
Glover
McGill
Shackleton
TEAM
Totals
Score by Periods
MICHIGAN
MS U

FG
10-21
2-8
8-13
1-3
12-25
0-3
2-4
1-1
1-4
0-0
0-1

FT
0-0
1-2
2-3
0-0
4-6
0-0
0-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0

R
10
2
14
4
3
0
3
0
0
1
1

5
2
3
2
0
2
3
0
0
0
0

20
5
18
2
28
0
4
2
2
0
0
81
F
97
81

It was the Hoosiers' second
straight loss. Both Indiana a n d
Purdue now have 6-2 conference
records.
Purdue led virtually the entire
game, the widest margin at 53-45
with 10:33 left in the game. The
Hoosiers battled back, however,
and pulled within one, 68-67, and
had the ball when Steve G r e e n
was called for a charging foul
with 27 seconds to go.
The Boilermakers scored their
last four points from the free-
throw line, while Indiana's 1 a s t

basket came on a long jump shot
by freshman Jim Crews.-
Gamauf, a senior guard w h o1
had been averaging just four3
points a game, pumped in 15 in
the first half, along with nine re-
bounds, en route to his 22-point
career high.
INDIANA TRAILED by seven at:i
one point in the first half,23-16,
but came back in the closing min-
utes to take the lead at 28-27 on
a jumper by freshman Quinn
Buckner.
Indiana never led after the in-
termission. After a 45-45 tie, Pur-
due ran off eight straight in.
the next three minutes.I
Bucks burrowed
COLUMBUS - "Just another,
road triumph," Ron Behagen cal-
led Minnesota's emotional, nation-
ally-televised 80-78 basketball vic-
tory over Ohio State yesterday.
"The boos didn't bother me. I've
played in rougher places," main-',
tainedt he 6-foot-10 senior forward
after muscling for 33 points before
a jeering sellout St. John Arenal
crowd. 1

Clyde Turner, playing guard at
6'7', was held to seven points
by the Buckeye defense, more than
11 under his season average.
MINNESOTA'S intimidating mat-
chup zone defense held Alan Horn-
yak, the conference's top scorer,
in check until the closing minutes.
Ilini badgered
MADISON, Wis. - Wisconsin,
with Leon Howard and Kerry
Hughes combining for 47 points,
raced to a 20 point lead and hung
on to upset Illinois 99-88 in a Big
Ten baskdtball game yesterday.
The defeat, second for the Illni
in the conference against f o u r
victories, severely jolted t h e i r
championship hopes.
Wisconsin grabbed a 41-21 lead in
the early going, outrebounding the
shorter Illini and hiting at a .500
clip during the first half.
Illinois' Nick Weatherspoon, who
entered the game as the Big Ten's
No. 2 scorer with a 27.2 average,
was held to 20 points by K r y

* full court
* RESS
...Wilmore sparkles
By BOB HEUER
OH, YOU talent-laden Michigan offense, where have you been
hiding all season? Oh, potent, multi-pronged attack, where
were you when we played Indiana, Iowa and Illinois? Where were
those beautiful fast breaks and long range howitzers when we
trailed by two with a minute to go?
From wherever it's been hiding, the Michigan offense sur-
faced inside Crisler Arena yesterday to bury Michigan State
and brighten the cage picture for the campaign's remaining
weeks.
The ball game was a study in contrast to the Wolverines'
recent contests. The story was one of hustling after loose balls,
hitting the outlet man for numerous fast breaks and par-
leying razor sharp passes to easy points.
The story was also C. J. Kupec and Wayman Britt coming
off the bench, Britt in a starting role, to spark the team with
key playmaking and scoring punch.
But most of all, the story was Henry Wilmore. You remember
Henry. He dazzled the crowd two years ago with a style of
play heretofore unseen outside the playgrounds of New York,
with spinning, twisting lay-ups followed by 30-foot bombs and
one-man length of the floor dashes, and spurts of incredible
ball-hawking and reboundiing thrown in for good measure.
Wilmore must have had game-long deja-vu yesterday. He
tossed in 13 field goals, and eight of ten free throws, grabbed
13 rebounds and in general, came up with what Johnny Orr
termed "a super effort."
Only Henry Wilmore could rebound, dribble through the
whole Spartan team at least once, head down, ball flying in
all directions, and drop in a 15-foot turnaround bank shot.
Only Wilmore could make the ball pop like a cherry bomb
when he wiped the boards clean.
What possessed him to give the 13,609 fans one of his patented
performances after such a lengthy interlude? The 6-3 co-captain
had a simple explanation. "I guess you could call it just plain
desire," he told reporters after the game.
"I was disgusted with the way I played last week," he con-
tinued, referring to a performance against Illinois described by
Orr as "flat" and with "a total lack of movement."
But yesterday, Henry was back in the limelight, and he loved
every minute of it. "I like to run. Running is my game," he
explained. "They played a zone and we ran them much better
than we could against a man-to-man."
Wilmore spoke of being relaxed on the court, but pooh-
poohed the notion that the lack of title pressure improved
the play. "I feel more comfortable now," he related. "But the
pressure to win isn't any less than it was before. This seemed
like a championship game to me."
The atmosphere in the Michigan lockerroom didn't conflict
with Wilmore's assessment. Broad smiles and back slapping
abounded following the big win. "It was a long time coming,"
beamed a relieved Johnny Orr, "but its a good feeling."
By the looks of things, the win signalled not only an end to
the Wolverines' three-game losing streak, but a springboard to
a strong Big Ten finish which could conceivably propel them
back into the race. After yesterday's action, Michigan trails co-
leaders Purdue and Indiana by two games in the loss column
with five still to play.
"We're just gonna go out and try as hard as we can to
win," prophesied Wilmore. "And I think people are gonna
see this (yesterday's result) for the next five games." I've
got five more good ones coming."
The great success of the team's offensive outburst must be
tempered with the knowledge that Michigan State brought up
the rear of the conference in defense, allowing the Maize and
Blue to top 80 points in a league for the first time this year.
Orr, even in victory, lamented the fact that his team allowed
a Big Ten opponent to break the 80-point mark also for the first
time. What the coach now may be questioning is his decision to
stress defense this year.
As successful as his defense has been, the low-scoring con-
tests have been lost as often as won. Yesterday, with the defense
somewhat less than superb, the Wolverines ran over, around and
through the outmanned Spartans.
Perhaps the emphasis on stopping the opponent has taken its
toll o the running and gunning of players with the firepower of
Henry and Campy. That would be a difficult contention to prove,
but if Wilmore has "five more good ones coming" as he claims,
the accent will be on offense for the duration.

KEN BRADY (15) takes the ball
to the bucket for a quick two
against Michigan State yester-
day. The cagers shook their
lethargy and simply swamped
the Spartans. Though they have
been victims of poor luck of late,
yesterday's Big Ten results gave
the heretofore nonexistent Big
Ten title hopes some light.

I

u

x

5
37-83 7-13 43
1
44
37

17
2
53
44

officials: Robert Burson, J a m e s
Eaddy, Roger Parramore
Attendance: 13,609

Gymnasts withstand Oklahoma,
Bob Darden upsets Sooner rally

Keep America Clean.
Keep America Beautiful.
;Advertising contributed
for the public good.

By RICH STUCK with an incredible display of tun- won, however, by Sooner strong- "
The Michigan gymnastic ,squad j bling and leaping abiilty. Lovin, boy Mike Mihalco. Michalco had Behagen and teammate Corky
built up a heavy lead in the first the reigning NCAA floor exercise the crowd of 2001 oohing and Taylor had been suspended for the
five events yesterday and man- champion, continued his two-year ahhing as he performed endless season for their part in a bloady,
aged to survive a hectic high bar unbeaten string with the victory. tests of strength. game-ending brawl between the
performance to defeat the Okla- At the end of the first event Mich- The tough ringmen pushed the two Big Ten rivals in Minneapolis
homa Sooners 161.10-160.25 in a igan held a .35 advantage. Wolverine edge even higher as Jan. 25, 1972. This was their first
dual meet at Crisler Arena. Michigan opened the gap a little they led 81.30-79.45 at the halfway meeting since then.
The Wolverines took the early wider with some solid perform- point of the meet. OHIO STATE'S Luke Witte, hos-
lead in the opening event, the floor ances on the side horse. Gura con- By the time the fourth event, ATEr Luke Witte,
exercise, as all three performers tinued his fine afternoon with a vaulting, came around Loken's pitalized after last year's melee,
scored over 9.0. Terry Boys got 9.05 to win the event. leapers were in full gear. The 9.15 goredfossng higt b 5toi"sbe-
a 9.2 to lead the Maize and Blue, Michigan mentor Newt Loken by Leclerc added to Gura's 9.05 fore fouling out, but said, "I slept
Ward Black came in with a 9.1 made one major lineup change as helped add dust to the Sooner went to bed at 10.
and Captain Ray Gura a 9.0. mae ne majr lnechange as wagon. Tommy Yuen and Greg
he inserted Pierre Leclerc into theGodu
But Oklahoma's Odess Lovin all-around competition replacing oodhue both scored over 9.0 for Neither side managed m o r e
stole the show as he recorded a 9.4 all-aroundtin difI Oklahoma. than a five point lead until t he

Hughes and left on fouls with 5:1 1
to go.

,i

Beautiful
opals

i
i !
1

BILLIARDS
TABLE TENNIS
BOWLING
FOOSBA L L
UNION

Bsruce medd. Leclerc naa some - i
ficulty in the early going but was
great in his specialty as he vault-
ed to a 9.15 off the long horse.
The Wolverine ring team had
another superb day, outscoring the
Sooners 27.25-27.10 in one of the
best events of the meet.
Monty Falb had his now fa-
miliar high score, this time a
9.3 while Joe Neuenswander fol-
lowed with a 9.05. The event was

ii
NATURAL FOODS RESTAURANT
REOPENS TUES., FEB. 6
9 to 9 Daily Sunday 4-9 Closed Monday
NATURAL FOODS STORE
M A/ ArI- I .ne IfCDCeU RAJ D r A %f%1C

Before the meet Loken said that
Michigan would be "hard pressed
to win." He needn't have worried.
His gymnasts knew what they had
to do and they did it, coming up
with some steady performances.
The parallel bars proved no ex-
ception as Bob Johnson continued
his hot streak on the bars with a
9.2 mark and Gura chipped in with
a 9.05. Oklahoma's Roger Letrou-
reau tied Johnson for honors here
as he displayed his wares to the
tune of a 9.2.
In what was rapidly turning
into a Michigan strong point, the
Maize and Blue clad high bar
team had to take a back seat to
Oklahoma this time around. The
Sooners took the exercise 27.35-
25.60, and it looked for awhile
that maybe, just maybe, OklI-
homa might steal the entire
meet.
But Michigan's red-haired wi7ard
Bob Darden saved the day with
his brilliant 9.2 score.
Gura capped his outstanding day
with a so-so 8.5 in the high ba; but
still managed to capture the all-
around crown, easily outdistancing
the pack with a total of 5355.

Gophers hit their hot streak in the
second half, taking advantage of
four straight Buckeye turnovers.
Ohio State was on top 37-36 at
halftime before Minnesota went
ahead to stay on a three point play
by Dave Winfield. That gave the
Gophers a 49-46 edge with nearly
13 minutes left.
Big Ten{
Standings
W L Pct.
Indiana 6 2 .750
Purdue - 6 2 .750
Minnesota 5 2 .714
Illinois 4 2 .667
MICHIGAN 5 4 .555
Michigan State 3 5 .375
Ohio State 3 4 .429
Wisconsin 3 6 .333
Iowa 2 5 .286
Northwestern 1 6 .150

.A

S

Broach $35

Earring $27

Genuine opals in set-
tings of 14Karat Gold
Overlay.. with green

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