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February 06, 1973 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-06

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4

PQ e Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 6, 1973

- - .1

Schenthal

LA. LUNGER
anchors divers

Tuesday
through
Tursday.
Bratwurst,
* Beerp
9941I.
Steaming hot German
bratwurst on a fresh
roll served with a frosty
mug of premium beer...
an Old Heidelberg
special, Tuesday
throughThursday.
Hdeberg

:1

By THERESA SWEDO
With Michigan's emphasis on
football, basketball and hockey,
minor sports often seem to get
lost in the shuffle. While there's
magic in the name of C a m p v
Russell, you could live next drnor
to a talented minor sport ath-
lete and never know it.
For example, few persons
would ever suspect that south-Y
erner Steve Schenthal is a two-
time finalist in the AAU Diviog
Championships.
Schenthal, a junior, is an out-
standing diver on Michigan's five
man team. He holds two Louis-
iana high school championships
and many NCAA awards in ad-
dition to the AAU titles.
Called "The Fastest Spinner in
the World" by diving coach Dick
Kimball, Schlenthal began diving
at age nine in Metairie, Louis-
Loi-iana.
"In the South they don't stress
athletics in -school like they do
here," he said. "Most of the
activity is involved with the
Amateur Athletic Union, a n d
there are quite a few clubs.

"I started swimming at six in
inter-club competition. Then they
made me start diving because
the club was so small they didn't
have anybody else to do it,"
Schenthal stated.
At fifteen, Steve started work-
ing out with Dick Kimball, Mich-
igan's diving coach, at Kimball's
summer camp. Kimball holds a
diving clinic every summer in
Tampa, Florida.
Schenthal regards Michigan's
swimming mentor "as the ulti-
mate diving coach. He is capable
of showing us the right way to do
the dives. He is an amazing
man."
"I've trained with Kimball
every summer now except the
one in-between my senior year in
high school and my freshman
year here. That's because of an
intercollegiate rule," he contin-
ued.
Schenthal came north to Mich-
igan with ambitions of going to
medical school. He is major-
ing in zoology.
"I really admire this school
for it's athletic program. As far

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as I'm concerned, it has the best
undergraduate program that I
know of. The only time that it
was difficult for me to adjust
was in the winter term of my
freshman year," he commented.
The freshman year is a diver's
most difficult year. The rookie
divers are closely supervised and
strenuously trained.
"Freshman have to dive twice
a day, for 2/2 to 3 hours a day,"
Steve remarked. "Every day ex-
cept Sunday is spent diving. We
got a few days off for the vaca-
tions, the most being five days
for Christmas."
He continued, "We begin to
look forward to holidays, like one
day off every three months. One
day a week we practice exclus-
ively on diving from the 7% met-
er (25 foot) tower. The other
practices are split up between
the one and three meter dives."
The following years are 1 e s s
intense. Practice starts in mid-
October, and continues twice a
day until April. Following t h e
AAU Indoor Nationals in April,
the divers vacation until mid-
May.
At that time the twice-a-day
practice resumes. This is in pre-
paration for the AAU Outdoor Na-
tionals in August.
There are five men who keep
this grueling schedule. T h e y
constitute the Michigan diving
team, competing in conjunction
With the swimming team.
Practice is co-ed, held with
women who are known as Mich-
igan divers, although they are
not eligible to compete. Some
notable Michigan divers include
Olympians Jan Ely and Captain
Micky King.
"In meets we're judge on our
approach, form, ability to handle
the tricks and our finish into the
water. A lot of the judging is
subjective; this was one of the
big difficulties in the Olympics,"
he said.
"I'd guess the ten meter tow-
er is my specialty," Steve con-
i -I
MICHIGAN UNION

tinued. "I do wall from t e n
meters because I perform better
in the air than I do taking off
the boards. Twister optionals are
specialty tricks for me."
Athletic and academic pressures
have limited Schenthal to a min-
imum of leisure time. In addi-
tion to the time spent with div-
ing, he has a major commitment
as captain of the football cheer-
leading squad.
"It's tough to dive, cheerlead,
and study all at the same time.
I don't get much time to sleep,"
he remarked.
"Kimball introduced me to
cheerleading when I was a
freshman, and so far I have nev-
er watched a football game from
the stands. I never knew that
the band marched out in an "M"
formation. From down there is
just looks like a bunch of people.
"Many of the divers for this
school have been associated with
cheerleading also. Even Kimball
was a cheerleader when he was
at school here," he mentioned.
"There have been some hard
times fitting everything in. Right
now I'm in the process of slowly
adjusting to academics and ath-
letics.
"There are still times when I've
felt that I couldn't do both. But
it always turns out that I do."

Doily Photo by RANDY EDMONDS
STEVE SCHENTHAL, Wolverine diver from the Bayou country in
Louisiana, steadies himself for a backward two and one-half flip
in the tuck position with a degree of difficulty of 2.6.

x

AMAYA STARS:
Netters place fifth in nationals

4

By LEBA HERTZ
Achieving a fifth place tie, Coach
Brian Eisner's Michigan tennis
team came out of the National In-
door Team Championship last
week-end with a definite chance
of becoming one of the top college
teams in the country. The top six-
teen collegiate teams competed in
this tournament, which was held
for the first time. The team that
gathered the most points out of
nine won the round.
In the first round, Michigan de-
feated . last year's Southeastern
Conference Champion, Georgia, 7-
2. In the next round, UCLA, which
was a 9-0 victor over Columbia, de-
feated Michigan, 8-1. However,
Michigan's number one singles
Victor Amaya defeated Jeff Aus-
tin who is regarded as one of the
top two college players in the na-
tion by 6-3, 3-6, 6-3. By defeating
Austin, Amaya ,a freshman, es-
tablished himself as one of the
top two or three tennis players in
collegiate competition. Amaya has

yet to be defeated in college match previous matches,
play. In the number four singles, Kev-
MICHIGAN played in this cham- in Senich of Michigan lost the first
pionship without their number two set 7-6 but took the next two sets
man, Freddy DeJesus who was to defeat Steve Briggs. Amaya
ill. As a result, Michigan played won by a score of 6-2, 6-4 over
UCLA without one of its key Ron Evett, a teammate of his at
players. Eisner says that since the the National Junior Davis Cup
other matches against the Bruins Championship in which the eight
were close and having DeJesus out, outstanding junior players of the
the team still came out thinking country competed.
that they have an excellent chance CAPTAIN Tim Ott defeated Bill
of defeating. UCLA in a match Hasher 7-6, 7-6. Entering into the
scheduled for May 1. doubles leading Arizona 4-2, Mich-
After the loss to UCLA, the Wol- igan won two doubles. Amaya and
verines came back and defeated Friedler defeated Hashar and Har-
Arizona by a score of 6-3. Ranked dy 6-4, 6-2 and the number three
seventh in the nation last year, doubles Senich and Raverby won
Arizona has all its players back over Briggs and Cunningham 7-6.
and the victory gave the Michigan Eisner and the team came out
team even more confidence. of the championship matches very
In two of the single matches, the pleased. The team played very
Michigan players came from be- well in spite of the loss of De-
hind to score victory. The number Jesus. This tournament was a
two singles, Eric Friedler, lost the measuring stick to see how much
first set 6-2 and came back to de- Michiigan's team had improved
feat Tom Mayer of Arizona in the in relation to the other national
next two sets, 6-1, 6-4. Friedler powers. Eisner says "The Michi-
had never beaten Mayer is five gan team made more progress
---than any other team in the coun-
try." Michigan's top three play-
CHOCOLATE ers, Amaya, Friedler, and De-
Jesus are all freshmen.
Welcome STANFORD defeated UCLA to
win the championship. Stanford,
UCLA, Southern Cal., and South-
GRAD ern Methodist are regarded as the
top teams in the country. SMU de-
COFFEE feated Arizona 6-3 and lost to
UCLA 7-2. Michigan played on a
HOU R par with SMU which makes it
seem as if its 18th ranking last
WEDNESDAY year should move up quite a bit.
W E In the N.C.A.A. format, each
8-10 p.m. team enters four players rather
than six. As a result, Michigan
West Conference can gear its team for its top two
Room, 4th Floo players, Amaya and DeJesus. Eis-
RACKHAM ner is sending these players to an
international tournament in Cal-
LOTS OF FOOD gary, Canada at which'ithe best
players in the world will be rep-
resented.

s,

i,

11

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