100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 03, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-'age righf,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

STATE OF THE UNION

Saturday, February 3, 1973

Nixon submits annual message
(Continued from Page 1) I more messages to Congress in the I sources"; the social evils and blights which

combination of intentions and fuzzy
follow-through which too often in
the past was thought sufficient,"
he added.
Nixon told Congress his eco-
nomic goals were: to hold down
taxes, continue controlling infla-
tion, promote economic growth,
increase productivity, encourage
foreign trade, keep farm income
high, help small business, and pro-
mote better labor-management re-
lations.
He said he would be sending

coming weeks on specific areas of
policy, including economic affairs,
natural and human resources, com-
munity development and foreign
and defense policy.
In addition to his goals for the
U.S. economy, Nixon outlined var-
ious other program objectives:
-In natural resources, "to pre-
serve and enhance the environ-
ment, to advance science and tech-
nology, and to assure balanced use
of our irreplacable natural re-

-In human resources, "to ad-l
vance the nation's health and edu-
cation, to improve conditions of
people in need, to carry forward
our increasingly successful attackst
on crime, drug abuse and injustice,,
and to deal with such important,
areas of concern as consumer af-
fairs"; and,
-In community development, to
create "more livable communities,
in which all of our children can1
grow up with fuller access to op-
portunity and greater immunity to

Figures show BGS popular

(Continued from Page 1) ;
oucked the trend of decreasing so-
cial science concentrators. Psy-
chology reached its peak in 1969
with 12.8 per cent of total upper-
classmen. The percentage has,
since dropped off to 10.65, but it is
still the most popular major out-
side of BGS.
Morris sees BGS as being re-,
sponsible for the decline in psy-
chology majors. "Students were
Talky given

Vby psychic
(Continued from Page 1)
research, he added.
"I have never found any

attracted by the freer nature of
the (psychology) program," he
said. After the introduction of
BGS, many students changed over.
. Prof. J. E. Keith, psychology
department chairman, indicated
that the popularity of psychology
has increased nationally, and that
with BGS it would probably have
continued to increasehere.
"Psychology is something stu-
dents consider relevant. They feel
that the problems in this country
are ones which psychological in-
sight could help," he said.
However, he added that the num-
ber of professional jobs in the field
have not been increasing as rap-
idly as the increase in the number
of students.
The popularity of the natural
sciences has also been affected.
There has been a rapid growth in
the biological sciences, especially
zoology. Zoology has grown by
almost one and a half per cent in
the last year alone.
According to Morris, the growth
of the biological sciences is tied
up with the new student interest
in the "helping" professions, espe-
cially in medical schools. He also
mentioned increased interest in
ecology and the environment as

another element adding to the de-
partment's popularity.
At the same time, the physical
sciences on the whole have de-
clined. Prof. Thomas Dunn, act-
ing chemistry department chair-
man, expiained that physical sci-
ences were extremely popular in
the fifties. "Physical sciences
have been overemphasizedin the
last ten years. Firms have stopped
recruiting, but jobs are opening
again. The decline should stop."
"Some biological sciences are
more immediately practical than
the physical sciences," Morris com-
mented. The physical sciences re-
quire more work after graduation,
he added.
Predicting future trends within
LSA is difficult. Morris sees a pos-
sible increase in Humanities, as
student dissatisfaction with the
social sciences begins to grow. The
shift away from certain of the
humanities ,such as English, will'
reverse itself and begin to stabi-
lize, he says.
In addition he believes that BGS
will also level off in the near fu-
ture.
However, changes in the job
market or major changes within
LSA could cause unpredictable
shifts in departmental popularity.

now plague so many of our townsx
and cities." \
Responding to Nixon's State of
the Union, top congressional Demo
crats lauded his promise of co-
operation yesterday, but made it 1
clear they may have some legis-
lative ideas of their own.
House Speaker Carl Albert (D-
Okla.) said he does "not subscribe
to the philosophy that 'the White..
House knows best'."
"The administration priorities
are not always the priorities of the v
Democratic Congress," Albert add-,
ed. "Congress will consider the
President's recommendations in
light of our own constitutional re-
sponsibilities as a co-equal branch
of government and our responsibili-
ties to the American people.,
* Senate Majority Leader Mike
Mansfield (D-Mont.) said "we will Come on,
endeavor to work constructively" A member of the Punxautawne
but "we recognize it's a two-way while two workmen attempt to co
street. burrow. (For details, see Today . .
New organization tries
educational experiment
By BETH EGNATER Zoology Prof. Robert Beyer.
In an attempt to "put learning The program is modeled after
back into the hands of people who The Learning Exchange operat-
want it", thirty volunteers-stu- ing in Evanston, Illinois. Started
dents, high school teachers and by graduate students, that group
University professors - have or- now claims 4,000 members.
ganized The Learning Exchange. "We expect we will grow at least
"We feel the best way to learn as rapidly because of the kind of
is outside of the classroom. We community we're involved with,"
want to de-institutionalize learn- Green said.
ing," Mark Green, chemistry pro- Grtnsad
fessor and spokesman for the group "It should be an educationally
said. explosive idea in a town like this
Consisting of a small office in -we're so rich in resources,"
Guild House at 802 Monroe, a tele- added volunteer Jean Mann, Resi-
phone and card file, The Learning dential College instructor.
Exchange is a free educational Subjects now on file range from
matching service. organic chemistry to dog training
Interested individuals call the and home repairs.
exchange and describe the skills
they wish to acquire or teach. The Green believes the exchange will
caller is given the names of other perform a valuable service to the
people with similar interests. University, "as any true learning
If no matches are available, the situation would."
caller's entry is placed on file

"FUNNY, BRILLIANT, OBSCENE!"
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times
"The most offensive picture I've ever seen."
-Wanda Hale
"FUNNY, ABSURD, INTELLIGENT!"
--Jonas Mekas, Village Voice
"PUTNEY SWOPE"
The Truth and Soul Movie
plus FLASH GORDON serial
LATE SHOW ONLY-FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
doors open 10:45-show starts 11 :00 p.m.
NOT CONTINUOUS WITH "RYAN'S DAUGHTER"
ITrUIV]

AP Photo
groundho
y, Pa. groundhog club watches
ax a groundhog from a manmade

76'1-97001

- rum

a

A'

t

way-I

out things that have been demon-
strated under any real research,
he said.
Swann delighted his audience
by interjecting humorous accounts
of his own psychic experiences.
He claimed that in the presence of
a Nobel-prizewinning scientist he
had psychically altered the mag-
netic field of a nuclear particle ac-
celerator that had been specially
designed to be inert to such elec-
tromagnetic changes.
He also spoke of the time he had
succeeded in projecting energy
images onto infrared film, and de-
scribed his communication
"through pictures" with a plant
named Lucifer.
To Baird Wallace, an electrical
engineer from Detroit who also
spoke last night, the future of so-
ciety depends on its purposely de-
veloping altered states of con-
sciousness. Wallace claims to have
had contact with beings of superior
intelligence from Neptune, who told
him a modern version of the old
story, "Repent, for the end is
near."
It all 'happened this way: a
friend of Wallace's suddenly be-
gan talking in his sleep. The
friend's wife, instead of telling
him to turn over, decided to talk
back. .She made the discovery that
a creature from Neptune was us-
ing her husband as a contact with
earth.
She did what any good wife
would do-she invited a group of
friends into the bedroom to listen
to the Neptunian who spoke
through her husband.
For some listeners, it was all a
little hard to take. Swann asked
one skeptic: "What would you do
if I suddenly transported you to the
top of the Empire State Building?"
"I'd probably jump off," he re-
plied.

Viet fighting continues

(Continued from Page 1)
the drop in level of fighting, the
Saigon high command has warned
against undue optimism that the
ceasefire would be properly re-
spected. Saigon claimed communist
violations of the ceasefire were
now nearing the 1,500 mark.
But according to field reports
South Vietnamese troops were com-
mitting similar violations, particu-
larly in efforts to reopen key high-
ways, four of which are still block-
ed. .
South Vietnamese President Ngu-
yen Van Thieu announced yester-
day, that South Vietnam will begin
political negotiations with the Viet
Cong in Paris no later than Tues-
day.
"I have ordered Ambassador
Pham Dang Lam to meet the Viet
Cong in Paris no later than Feb. 6
to solve the internal problems of
South Vietnam," Thieu declared in
a Tet lunar new year' television
address to the nation.
Thieu also called on the two
peacekeeping commissions in South
Vietnam to get cease-fire observers
into the field to stop the killing of
Vietnamese people.
Thieu said members of the four-
party Joint Military Commission in-
cluding representatives of the

United States, North and South
Vietnam, and the Viet Cong-"must
come to the fields." He said that
if the I.C.C.S. does not get ob-

s

COMPARE
73 CELICA "ST"
_ 2 DR. HARDTOP
SPORTS COUPE
== X3882
Total Del Price Incl.
Celica ST Dealer Prep, Freight,
Tax, Lic. & Title.
A I R CONDITIONED, AUTOMATIC TRANS.,
POWER DISC BRAKES, RADIAL TIRES, TINTED
GLASS, HEATED REAR WINDOW, FULL INSTRU-
MENTS INCLUDING TACHOMETER, CONSOLE,
RADIO, FULLY RECLINING BUCKET SEATS.
TOYOTA ANN ARBOR, Inc.
907 N. Main 769-7935

servers into the field, nthe com until one is found. Green stressed
munists will continue to violate the the organization's availability to
agreement and kill the Vietnamese all age groups.
pDelegates from Poland, Hungary, "The raison d'etre of this whole
Canada and Indonesia make up the thing is to get people together to
international control group. exchange interests and learn,"
Canada's chief delegate to the commented Exchange member and
I.C.C.S., Michel Gauvin, an-
nounced yesterday that chief dele-
gates to the Joint Military Commis- ,
sion had been invited to meet
I.C.C.S. leaders for a working ses-
sion today.
"We would like to know when
they are going to move, when they
will move to the regional head-
quarters, that sort of thing," Gau-
vin said.
The I.C.C.S. meeting yesterday
lasted four hours-the longest ses-
sion yet._ this fOUM
.AND NOW $2.0o0:~
i-
FR I.-SAT.
FRM UR H E DY WIFEST
CREATOR:
"A stunning performer"
-Wash. Post
"Brilliant."
Mch. Daily
1411 Full STREET
adverisng sotflbuted s coW
for the public good p
LSSS Films
PRESENTS
S"THE REIVERS"
with STEVE McQUEEN
Saturday, Feb. 3, 1973
TIME: 7,9,11 P.M.

Wh~ - ir Whd~yTime..

K

, w ./

.1

}
t

i

1 E

F

am&ms f t1 Dig? n a

-

I I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan