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February 01, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-01

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Indian reporter eyes 'U' dorms

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

violence in America,

.i
i
i

EDITOR'S NOTE-Krishan Bhatia,
and Indian journalist who has lived
.in Washington five years, gives his
impressions of violence in America
in this dispatch published in his
newspaper, the Hindustan Times.
By KRISHAN BHATIA
WASHINGTON-The other day I'

Daily Photo by JOHN UPTON
The strike goes on
Picketing secretaries continue their strike against the Ann Arbor school system yesterday. The sec-
retaries post their guard in front of Pioneer High School.
MEETING NEXT WEEK:
Kissinger to fly to Hanoi

(Continued from Page 1)
dollars for North Vietnam, over
five years.
Asked what figure he had in
mind now, he said that would have
to be negotiated and the proposed
program would have to be discus-
sed with congressional leaders
first.
The President repeated his un-

alterable opposition to granting
amnesty to Americans who fled
the country to avoid the draft and
service in the Vietnam War.
He said those who refused to
serve or deserted the armed
forces would have to pay the price
-and that price was not a junket
in the Peace Corps.
The President insisted that those

Viet fighting slows;
control force meets

who refused to serve must face a
criminal penalty for disobeying the
law.
If they did not want to return,
they were welcome to stay in
whatever country wanted them,
he declared.
The President spoke somewhat
bitterly about anti-war dissenters
who, now that the war had ended,
were charging him with failure to
terminate it earlier.
Asked if he would grant am-
nesty and so heal the wounds of
controversy and division, he said
some people were not taking
pleasure from the peace agreement
and it made one wonder if they
wanted to heal the wounds.
The President said he knew
some'anti - administration report-
ers listening to him gagged when
he claimed he had secured peace
with honor but it was true he had
achieved that kind of a peace and
most Americans realized it was

drove to my bank here for somel
routine chore. As I was about to
turn into the parking area reserved
for the bank's customers, I noticed
a number of police cars with their
beacon lights on and an ambulance
parked round the bank. I assumed
that the bank was being robbed,
and instead of making the intended
turn drove straight ahead to a near-
by bookshop to browse through
some new arrivals until the rob-
bery was over. About 45 minutes
later, I returned to the bank,
cashed my check, and itwas only
when I was halfway to my home
that I realized that I had not in-
quired of the bank clerk if anyone
had been injured in the holdup.
Five years ago, when I first ar-
rived in Washington, my reaction
to reports of violence here used to
be considerably sharper. I was'
appalled by the realization that
almost half of the U.S. capital was
unsafe after dark. I was shocked
to notice salesmen and managers
of stores in the city's business cen-
ter conspicuously wearing gun
holsters or having vicious-looking
dogs within call. I lodged many a
vehement mental protest against
the suggestion from friends that
when driving out in the evening
even in the "safe" areas I must
leave my purse and valuables at
home and watch out for suspicious-
1looking individuals should I stop at
a traffic light at an isolated cross-
ing. Did I ever experience any
such worries during my 21-year
stay in Delhi, I often asked myself.
Now, as my behavior on the two
r e ce n t occasions indicated, I
scarcely notice violence or the
prospects for it that surround me.
I accept its existence like the con-
stant noise of speeding motor ve-
hicles from a nearby thoroughfare,
which bothered me much in the
beginning but which I now do not
even seem to hear. When going out
Most of the Arctic's lands lose
their covering of ice and snow in
the summer.

in the evening the removal of the
purse from my coat is a ritual per-
formed with about as much con-
scious thought as devoted to the
wearing of a necktie. During the
recent Christmas, when a first sec-
retary of the Indian Embassy was
robbed while walking near the
National Press Club early in the
evening, the incident, despite the!
fact that the victim suffered a
knife injury on his hand, causedI
among those of us who knew him
more hilarity than concern.
If a foreigner like myself can
become so indifferent to violence,
the acceptance of it by Americans,
who have been exposed to it for a
much longer period, is perhaps
pardonable.
Americans, it seems, are begin-
ning to develop a dangerous toler-
ance for crime. Instead of trying
to'combat it, they may, if they are
not careful, learn to live with the
constant threat of personal vio-
lence.
Those who wish to enjoy their
violence without having to pay for
it at the movie theater may turn
to their television sets. They will
not be disappointed. If the Vietnam
war is unable to provide the usual
daily quota ofvmutilated bodies and
gunfire, the void, it seems, may
adequately be filled by news stories
presenting ingreat visual details
snipers burning down a big hotel
and mowing down firemen and
policemen, as they did in New
Orleans recently, or gunmen taking
a dozen hostages in a New York:
store, or the report of some un-
known persons who walked into al
Washington home on a sunny after- I
noon last week to kill three infants
by drowning them in the bathtub
and knifing four adults to death.
Television viewers here, in fact,
may hardly miss the Vietnam war.
HAIRSTYLING
As You Like It !
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS - SHAGS
AND RAZOR CUTS
2 SHOPSC
611 E. UNIVERSITY
615 E. LIBERTY
Doscola Barbers

. . am ampn., %pm.
The University of Minnesota claims Student Lab Theatre: DeGhelde-
the highest rate with an astound- rode's A Night or Pity;" Gurney's
"The Love Course," Arena Theatre,
ing 100 per Cent. Frieze 1:dg., 4 pm.
Russian and Eastern European Stu-
dies Ctr.; Movie, "'The. Battle of Rus-
Tagging lobsters for study is in- sia;"speaker, A. 0. Meyer, Lect. Rm.
effective because the crustaceans 1, MLB, 4 pm.
International Night: Food of India,
shed their shells as they grow. League cafeteria, 5 pm.

give less
for money
(Continued from Page 1)
which is .often less expensive.
The return rate for University
dorm residents is estimated at 34
per cent while the average for
other Big Ten schools is consider-
ably higher.
The rate ranges from 30 to 100
per cent in the rest of the Big Ten.

I

Mid Winter Psychic Seminar
Friday, February 2, 1973
LECTURE
ETHICS, DISCIPLINES, AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF PSYCHIC DEVELOPMENT
MRS. PHYLLIS SCHEMMER-
astrologer, psychic-medium and Director of the Psychic Center of Florida at Orlando

'IIhJURiSDAY, FhR'RUARY I
DAY CALF'ND R
Geology & ; ermlogy Lecture: M.A.
Conrad res. sci'r'tist, Owen-Ill. Glass,
Toledo, "Gs assceramics, Fabrication
and Uti ization," 2022 C. C. Little
Bldg., ,I am.
Maternal & Child Health Film Ser-
ie:"Diary of a Harlem. Family;"
"This is the Home ofrMrs. Levant
Graham," 1170 SPH II, Noon.
Computing Ctr. Lecture: "Introduc-
tion to the Leading Process in MTS,"
Seminar TPm., Comp. Ctr., 3:30 pm.
Psycniatry, MHRI Lecture: J. D.
Singer. "Prediction in Foreign Policy:
The Generation & Use of Indicators,"
1057 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
LSA: D: I. Grossvogel, Cornell Univ.,
"Literature & Motion Pictures," Rack-
hl~n,, A. hi 4n

Music S,.hool: William Atkinson,
trumpet, SM Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Musicni Society: Alvin Alley Dance
Theater, Lower Ctr., 8 pm.
University rlayers: Pinero's "The
pm.
Magistrate." Lydia Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
Rive Gauche: International coffee
hour. 1024 Hill St., 9 pm.
SUMMER ILACEMENT
212 SAB
ANNOUNCEMENT
U. S. rept. of Commerce, Washing-
ton, D. C. Summer Intern Program
Social and Economic Statistics Admin.
for studints completing Bachelor's in
June, interested in quantitative work
in the various economic and demo-
graphic fields. Further details avail.

T I

3:00 P.M.
MODERN LANGUAGE BLDG.
AUDITORIUM 3
U of M, ANN ARBOR

FREE TO ALL

I

LEADERS AND WORKSHOPS
session 1

7:00 to 8:45

INGO SWANN-
noted artist and active partici-
pant in psychical research.
MRS. PHYLLIS SCHLEMMER-
astrologer and psychic-medium
ROBERT ERICSSON-
National .Executive Director of
SFF, teacher and healer.
BAIRD WALLACE-
research engineer and investi-
gator of extraterrestrial phe-
nomena.

r g- s

LATEST DEVELOPMENTS
IN PARA-PSYCHOLOGICAL
RESEARCH
PSYCHIC DEVELOPMENT I
HEALING ENERGIES
AN ENGINEER LOOKS
AT UFO'S

session 2 9:00 to 10:30
ART AND EXPANDED
CONSCIOUSNESS
PSYCHIC DEVELOPMENT I
HEALING OUR HANG-UPS
TEACHINGS FROM
OUTER SPACE

(Continued from Page 1)
the demilitarized zone, the Saigon
command reported alleged cease-
fire violations dropped over-all in
South Vietnam by one-third to little
more than 200 during the last 24
hours. That compared to more than
300 in the previous reporting per-
iod.
The Saigon command charged
that total North Vietnamese and
Viet Cong violations have reached
nearly 1,000 since the cease-fire
officially began at 8 a.m. Sunday.
It claimed 2,434 North Vietnamese
and Viet Cong troops have been
killed and 113 captured. South Viet-
namese losses were reported as
434 troops and 15 civilians killed
and 1,633 troops and 90 civilians
wounded. In addition, 129 South
Vietnamese soldiers were reported
missing.
North Vietnam's Foreign Minis-'

try repeated its claim that the
Vietnamese communists h a v e'
"completely honored" all terms of
the Vietnam peace agreement, and ]
again accused the South Viet-
namese of breaking the cease-fire.
On the di lomatic front Vice-

DONATION FOR WORKSHOPS-$2.'0 each

REGISTRATION for Workshops 6 to 7 P.M. in
Office of Reliigous Affairs, 3rd floor, Michigan Union

President Spiro Agnew, met with true.
President Thieu for an hour yes- He said it would have been a
terday on the second day of his peace with dishonor if the United
trday to the seonday o States had bugged out and allowed
visit to South Vietnam. the imposition of a coalition com-
No details were disclosed of the munist government on the South
talks and Saigon Radio said only Vietnamese.
that they discussed post-war re- "We can' speak about peace with
lations between the two countries. honor with some pride," he de-
clared.
Agnew flew into Saigon Tuesday Nixon was one of the last Amer-
for his first stop in a seven-nation ican officials to visit Hanoi in the
tour of Asia. He met Thieu soon past two decades, flying there in
after his arrival. November, 1953, to confer with
French officials when he was
He is scheduled to go to Thailand Vice-President in President Eisen-
later today. hower's administration.

EVERYONE WELCOME
Lecture sponsored by Office of Religious Affairs and Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship
Workshops sponsored by Esoteric Studies Group and Spiritual Frontiers Fellowship

F,

m

F4,

Low-income households obtain
help in preparing tax returns

(Continued from Page 1)
turns average around twelve dol-
lars.
To meet the need of low-income
people IRS has set up the Volun-
teers Income Tax Assistance Pro-
gram (VITA) w h i c h provides
teaching materials and manpower

to train those volunteers who will
aid the taxpayers. VITA also pro-
vides free consultation for diffi-
cult tax problems.
Utilizing VITA's resources, Pro-
ject Community held two work-
shops in early January to train

Chinese new year begins

18 student volunteers who signed
up for the program.
Although the program is aimed
primarily at low - income house-
holds, Harris said that anyone,
including students, could take ad-
vantage of it.
The assistance program is in full
swing this week and will continue
through mid-April, the point at
which Harris expects the service
to be inundated with the tradi-
tional flurry of late filings.
The sites and times at which the
tax assistance will be given are:
Model City Community Skills In-
stitute, 7-9 p.m. Monday through
Friday, and 10 a.m. to noon Sat-
urdays; also at the Ann Arbor
Public Library, 2-5 p.m. Monday
through Saturday, and the Ann Ar-
bor Community Center, 10 a.m. to
noon on February 3rd and 24th
only; and 7-9 p.m. on January 30
and 31 only.

(Continued from Page 1)
t h e s e apparently reflect the
strength of demand rather than a
dearth of supplies, and their ap-
pears to be no shortage of money.
But there is an apparent drift
from strictly ideological themes
Use Daily
Classifieds

and posters depict a girl feeding
geese and children at play in a
rural scene.
Also for the first time since the
CulturalRevolution, othertradi-
tional Chinese entertainments have
reappeared, such as ballad singing
accompanied by a one-string,
plucked instrument. It reappeared
only recently in Peking after an
absence of six years.

Eugene Ormandy
Rudolf Serkin
Van Cliburn
Isaac Stern
Jessye Norman
T[he Philadelphia Orchestra.
Thor Johnson
& The University Choral Union
request the pleasure of
your company at the 80th Annual
May Festival, Wednesday, Thursday,
Friday and Saturday-May 2nd, 3rd
4th and 5th at 8:30 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor
UMIVERSITY

I

e][and WNRZ
PRESENTS
A SPECTACULAR ROCK 'N' ROLL
Battle of the Bands

{

TONIGHT
Last Showing

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K.

I

STENCH STAG
and
the Stagnants
.Ic.

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