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February 01, 1973 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-01

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 1, 1973

Page------------- Six---- T H

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plus 10 ?/o service and tax
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based on quad occupancy
DATES: March 3-10; March 17-24; April 21-28
For Affinity Groups of 40 or More
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4
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AT TH E
UNION GALLERY
FRIDAY EVENINGS-7-10 P.M.
I N-j

Grapplers gra
as Big T

)

for glory

-4r

By JIM ECKER
Fans of the Michigan winter
sports scene have had little to
cheer about this season. First, it
became obvious from the very
beginning that Al Renfrew and
his hockey crew would mire
themselves in the lower eche-
lons of the WCHA loop.
Next, Johnny Orr's "Big Ten
and NCAA contenders" all but
fell by the wayside
While other teams have at-
tracted all the ink and hoopla,
the Michigan wrestling team has
quietly established itself as one
of the better aggregation of
grapplers in the nation.
Experts say Michigan has
snuck past Michigan State into
a position of challenging the
"big three" of Iowa State, Okla-
homa State and Washington for
NCAA wrestling laurels.
THAT BOAST may be prema-
ture, but take a look at what's
happened. Michigan ran its dual-
meet record to 8-0 last weekend
with a couple of "pieces of pie"
over Purdue and Illinois, cruis-
ing by a combined 78-5 count.
Back in December, the Wol-
verines ended Penn State's four-
year dual-meet unbeaten streak
with an overwhelming victory.
Later, strong Pittsburgh and
Ohio University teams fell to
Michigan's men. And just this
week, three Wolverine wrestlers
were tabbed to represent the
East squad in the annual East-
West All-Star wrestling match.
COACH RICK BAY thought

"the first three meets will show
if this will be just a good Mich-
igan team or a great one." The
first three meets were Penn
State, Pitt and Ohio U. Time to
haul out another "great" appel-
lation and lavish the Wolverines
with praise?
Well, not yet. The real tests
are yet to come. Of immediate
concern is this weekend's match-
es against Big Ten contenders
Iowa and Minnesota. Although
Michigan is favored to extend its
unbeaten streak to ten straight,
Bay terms the meets "tossups."
"Both teams line up favorably
with each other," Bay said of
Friday night's affair with Iowa.
"We don't have a clear advant-
age in any of the classes."
Michigan's mentor thinks the
first couple of contests will
determine the outcome. For
Michigan that means Jim Brown,
Billy Davids and Jeff Guyton
draw heavy responsibility for
success.
Brown, who along with Jerry
Hubbard and Gary Ernst were
picked for the all-star meet, has
developed the healthy habit of
getting Michigan off to quick
starts. In eight dual meet match-
es; the 118-pounder has racked
up three pins, two superior deci-
sions and a win-by-forfeit.
DAVIDS AND GUYTON have
been in and out of the muddled
:26 and 134-pound picture all
year. Davids started at 134, cut
to 126, didn't make weight last
week and just yesterday won his

en seaso
126 pound job back with an ex-
citing 8-7 challenge match vic-
tory over Jim Blanks.
One of Michigan's all-stars
will not be wrestling in Monday
night's grappling classic. Heavy-
weight Ernst yielded his spot on
the honor society to the heavy-
weight from Lehigh University.
The e a s t e r n coaches, with
Ernst's approval, decided it
would be better to give someone
a little bulkier a shot at the
West's all-star, a fellow named
Chris Taylor from Iowa State.

na

a1

starts

You might figure
heavyweight would1
annoyed at missing
all-star opportunity.

Michigan's
be a little
out on the

this weekend. Confidence ran
high at yesterday's final full
workout before the scheduled
events.
When Jerry Hubbard heard
that his coaches rate all match-
es on Friday as "tossups," he
shot back "Yeah, but the coin
they're tossing for my match has
two heads, and I've got heads."
Ernst didn't think Michigan
wrestled well last weekend (de-
spite the scores) and looks for
improved performance Friday
and Saturday.
"Except for Penn State we
haven't done anything yet," said
the grappler who will be work-
ing on his third pin in a row
Friday night. "We've still got a
lot to prove."
That they do. Should Mich-
igan survive Iowa and Minne-
sota unscathed, a showdown for
the Big Ten's dual meet cham-
pionship would follow Feb. 10
against Michigan State.
THE "R E A L" conference
champion is crowned following
competition in the Big.Ten Tour-
nament, held this year at the
University of 'Minnesota.

d1

"NOT REALLY," claimed the
Saline big man. "What would be
the point in wrestling him again?
What good would it be to be
known as the best heavyweight
in the East who can't wrestle
anymore because Chris Taylor
destroyed him in an exhibition
match?"
WHAT ERNST and his team-
mates are looking forward to is

Daily Photo by DENNY GAINER
STEVE DOWNING outreaches Ken Brady to snare a rebound in
Saturday's Indiana victory over Michigan while Henry Wilmore
stands in awe of the powerful Hoosier pivotman. The victory put
Indiana in command of the Big Ten race.

MICHIGAN HOPES FADE:

Big

Ten cage race takes shape

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By GEORGE HASTINGS
Not amazingly, with the Big*
Ten basketball season approaching
the half-way point, there still re-
mains five teams with two losses
or fewer, who appear to have a
reasonable shot at the Big Ten
title. Amazingly, Michigan is not
one of them.
The Wolverines, who dropped
Vat Noe$
COmpany do?,

back-to-back games Saturday and
Monday, have come right to the
brink of elimination from the con-
ference race in one Big Ten week-
end. Meanwhile Indiana solidified
its stranglehold on the league
lead, Purdue kept up its surpris-
ingly close pursuit, and Minnesota'
came a ways toward re-establish-
ing itself as a contender.
Michigan, however, would have
to be the biggest story of the
weekend. Rated as one of the Big
Ten favorites, Michigan absorbed
its second and third defeats in its;
last four contests at the hands of
Indiana last Saturday and Iowa on
IMonday night.
IN EACH CONTEST, it was a
scoring lapse within the last five
minutes that allowed the opposi-
tion to build up a lead. This forced
the Wolverines to foul to get the
ball back, the fatal mistake. Only
Henry Wilmore came through over
the weekend for the Wolverines,
scoring 51 points in the two games.
Michigan's frustration was typi-
fied when it nearly lost its coach
Monday night, as Johnny Orr
stormed onto the court to protest
the lack of a goaltending call on
the Hawkeyes' Kevin Kunnert. Orr
had to be restrained by his assist-
ant Jim Dutcher.
It was Indiana, however, who
came out of the weekend action
smiling. The Hoosiers overcame
what promised to be one of their
biggest obstacles when they con-
quered Michigan in Crisler Arena,

their only confrontation with the the two games with Indiana, they
Wolverines this year. still have two contests with Min-
nesota, a game with Iowa, and
WITH PURDUE losing Saturday, road contests at Ohio State and
the smooth Hoosier ballclub be- Michigan State.
came the only undefeated power in
the league, with a 5-0 record. THE TEAM which really flexed
Coach Bob Knight's young squad its muscles, though, was Minne-
also demonstrated its depth, beat- sota, which demolished both
ing another contender despite the Michigan State and Wisconsin. Al-
fact that it lost four of its five though those two opponents ad-
starters for much of the game mittedly don't represent the class
with either fouls or injuries. of the conference, no Big Ten team
Purdue dropped out of its tie has dominated any other this year
for the conference lead Saturday, with as much ease as did the Go-
taking a tough loss at the hands of phers Saturday and Monday.
OhioState, 79-73. The Boilermakers Gopher mentor Bill Musselman
came back strong Monday night, feshsta sfnlyrahn
though, downing hapless North-
western 76-72 rits peak. "I think somespeople
Despite the split, Purdue with a strong tren"ohe st w
5-1 conference mark, remains on- strong we are, he says, "We're
ly a half game behind Indiana. just starting to reach our momen-
They have two shots left at Indi- tum. The two wins left Minnesota
ana. However, the Boilers have fourth, at 3-2.
the murderous portion oA their Ohio State, another Big Ten dis-
schedule in front of them. Besides appointment in the early going,

J,

evened it record at 2-2 with its
virtr t v Pilin d Thp B rk-

V11" f V J V
;:}:.V :" .{S1i:4Y Jfif " . " . " i"} : fA"l:tti":I HAt:"X ".

Big Ten
Indiana
Purdue
Illinois
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Michigan St.
Iowa
Northwestern
Wisconsin

V"c.or ; y victoryover vur ue. .L e uc s
Standings nearly ran Purdue out of its own
S19 arena, blasting out to a 24-8 lead,
W L Pct. and were never threatened.
5 0 1.000 For seventh-place Iowa, out of
5 1 .833 the title picture, the win over
2 1 .667 Michigan was the second and
3 2 .600 probably not the last in its series
4 3 .571 of spoiller roles. The victory broke
2 2 .500 Iowa's string of four consecutive
2 4 .333 Big Ten defeats.
2 4 .3331 Kevin Kunnert was again the
1 4 .200
1 6 .143 big man in more ways than one
for Iowa, as he hit Michigan with
324 points and 17 rebounds.

the board of the
the ann arbor film coopera * ve
is holding intervews
for new members.
If you are interested
come to room 164 East Quad
Sunday, February 11, 8 p.m.

FOR THE bottom three Big Ten
clubs, the weekend was very for-
gettable ,with one exception.
Michigan State was smeared by
Minnesota, Wisconsin by the same
club, and Northwestern by Pur-
due.
However, on Saturday in Evan-
ston the Wildcats won a battle to
keep out of the cellar by edging
Wisconsin 74-73, on a long shot by
Rick Sund with a second to go.
Northwestern's win left them at
1-4 in ninth, with Wisconsin dead
last at 1-6. Michigan State is tied
for seventh with Iowa, with a 2-4
mark.
Illinois, on semester break dur-
ing the last two weeks, was idle in
the Big .Ten, and remains in third
at 2-'1.

J

- 2.

"Supplying gas is a big job
and expensive

The Jewish Community Centers
of Chicago
Offer Summer Employment Opportunities
Social Work Oriented Country Camp
CAMP CHI-Located 50 miles north of Madison
and the University of Wisconsin
POSITIONS: Counselors-Male
Female
Supervisory
Specialists-Waterfront, Campcraft,
Arts & Crafts, Nature,
Athletics, Outdoor Education,
Tennis, Drama, Music, Sailing,

X
:'y

Consumers Power Company supplies nearly 900,000 cus-
tomers with natural gas. Those customers expect reliable
service at reasonable cost. And they're entitled to- it.
That's why Consumers Power is building this huge reform-
ing plant near Marysville. By the time it's fully operational,
it will have cost more than $120 million and will be deliver-
ing 200 million cubic feet of gas a day.
All of this new gas will be made by restructuring molecules
of light hydrocarbon liquids piped here from Canada. These

liquids are very similar to those burned in a cigarette lighter.
When processed, they yield supplemental gas identical to
natural gas.
It's not a cheap way of getting extra gas... but it would be a
lot more expensive if customers had to switch to another
form of energy.
And remember: Natural gas, like all forms of energy, is a
valuable commodity. Don't waste it!

v

I

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