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January 31, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-31

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Wednesday, January 31, 1973

rH. E MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, January 31, 1973 ~HE MICHIGAN DAILY

toni1!ght
6:00 2 47 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Maggie and the Beautiful
Machine
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Making Things Grow
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Zoom
7:30 2 What's My Line
4 Festival of Family Classics
7 Wild Kingdom
9 News
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Consumer Game
8:00 2 Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour
4 Adam-12
7 Paul Lynde
9 NHL Hockey
50 Dragnet
56 America '73
8:30 4 Madiga
7 Movie
"Snatched" (1973)
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Medical Center
56 Eye to Eye
9:30 56 Ask the Lawyer
10:00 2 Cannon
4 Bellevue
The Place To
MEET INTERESTING
People
BACH CLUB
MARTHA STERNBERG,
flute
DAVID LIPSON, piano
PERFORMING
Bach Suite No. 2 in B
Minor for flute & strings.
Martinu Sonata 1 for
flute & piano, 1st Move-
ment.
REFRESHMENTS AFTERWARDS
THURSDAY
February 1st-8 p.m.
Greene Lounge, East Quad
EVERYONE INVITED!
No musical knowledge needed
further info: 763-6256

7 Owen Marshall
50 Perry Mason
56 Soul!
10:30 9 Irish Rovers
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Movie
"Mongo's Back in Town" (71)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Comedy News
50 Movie
"The Mask of Dimitrios" (44)
12:00 9 Movie
"Rffair with a Killer"
(Canadian, 1967)
1:00 2 Movie
"The Candy Man" (69)
4 7 News
2:30 2 News
wcbn
listings
9:00 The Morning Show
11:00 Afternoon Rock
4:00 Contemporary Folk Mulsic
7:00 Rock 'n' Roll History
8:00 Soul-Jkzz-Blues
11:00 Progressive Rock
3:00 Sign-off
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in r e vi euai ng
poetry, and music,
drama, dance, film,
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
arts: Contact Ar't
Editor. c/o The
Michigan Daily.

Evocative and emotional .. .
Irodsky's poetic chantings

Doily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
Two gentlemen converse in a scene from the University Players' production of Pinaro's classic Vic-
torian farce "The Magistrate" which opens tonight and runs through Saturday.

NEW WORLD FILM COOP
-presents-
Rome.
Before Christ
After Felini.
An ALBERTO GRIMALDI Production
"FELL NI
SATYRICON
(English Subtitles)
COLOR by Deluxe' PANAVISON
[® q United APtists
THURSDAY
7:30 P.M. & 9:30 P.M.
LAST SHOWING
Modern Language Bldg.
AUD. III
Admission $1 .25

FILM-Psych. 171 Film Series shows Factory today in UGLI
Multipurpose Room 4; AA Film Coop presents Trumbo's
Johnny Got His Gun in Aud. A, at 7, 9 tonight; Cinema
Guild plays Hall's Goin' to Town in Arch. Aud. 7 at 7,
9:05; New Morning presents Husbands at M.L.B. tonight.
DRAMA-U Players present The Magistrate, a classic Vic-
torian farce by Sir Arthur Wing Pinaro at 8 in Mendels-
sohn; Student Lab Theatre performs DeGhelderode's A
Night of Pity and Gurney's The Love Course at Frieze
Arena at 4 this afternoon.
MUSIC-Keith Bryan plays flute in a duet with Karen Keys
playing piano and Hugh Lewis Cooper plays bassoon, all
from the Music School and at Rackham Aud. at 8 tonight.
FINAL
P ERFORMANC E
new
heavenly blue
THIS WEEKEND:
( BROOKLYN BLUES BUSTERS
THURS.-FRI.-SAT.-SUN.-f"
- F
r -"

A
R
T
S

By WARREN ROSENBERG
"From the report of the com-
mittee on work with young writ-
ers it is apparent that Brod-
sky is not a poet." The preceding
aesthetic conclsion was reached
during the 1964 Soviet trial which
sent Joseph Brodsky "to a dis-
tant locality for a period of five
years of enforced labor." In his
second poetry reading since com-
ing to the University in Septem-
ber, Brodsky again disproved his
detractors. The 32-year-old poet
read, or more appropriately
chanted, his poetry to a standing
room only crowd in the UGLI
Multi-purpose room yesterday as
Prof. Carl Proffer read the Eng-
lish translations.
The general feeling in t h e
room was one of frustration as
an understanding of Russian
would have made the rather pro-
saic English translations unne-
cessary. Brodsky's powerful,
emotion-filled voice, however,
was sufficiently evocative, and
like music, transcended lang-
uage boundaries.
In terms of content and theme,
Brodsky - who was born in
Leningrad of Jewish parents and
left school at 15 - reveals a wide
knowledge of contemporary and
classical world literature. Just
the poems read yesterday, "Vers-
es onethe Death of T. S. Eliot,"
"Aenean and Dido," and "Na-
tNre Morte," exhibit his wide
literary interests. In "Nature
Morte," however, his personal in-
tellectual and emotional strug-
gle is given expression in a
Beckett-like internal dialogue:
What then shall I talk about?
Shall I talk about nothingness?
Shall I talk about days, or
nights?
or people? No, only things,
since people will surely die.
All of them. As I shall.
All talk is a barren trade.
A writing on the wind's wall.
Melancholy is an anticipated
emotion in a man who spent two
years of his life away from fam-
ily and friends in the snowy
wastes of Archangel.tBut Brod-
sky has retained his sense of
humor and a degree of optimism.
In "The Wheelwright Died" writ-
ten in 1964, the year of his im-
prisonment, Brodsky forsees his
release and throws a jab at the
judge who had sentenced him:
he mends in some woodland
village
barrels in the spring season,
and in the oval of a tub

beholds the face of Jvxdge
Savelieva, and with his h-mmer
furtively taps on her forehead.
A final word on translations.
It has been often, and truly said,
that to translate poetry is such
a distorting process that it is
to the benefit of the poet, as well
as the reader, to avoid t h e
bother.
A case in point is Brodsky's
early poem (1960-1962) "Monu-
ment to Pushkin." From George
Reavey's translation; "Ending
their poems/with blood,/they dul-
ly dropped/to earth." Now Keith
Bosley's translation of the same
lines; "He concluded/his poems
with blood/They plopped earth-
ward." Numerous other exam-
ples could be cited but in these
quotations we can see the magni-
tude of the problem. In one poet

being referred to or more than
one? What has dropped to t h e
ground, the poems or the poets?
Did Brodsky want the allitera-
tive quality of "dully dropped"
or the tonally inappropriate
"plopped?"
Luckily, Richard Wilbur, a
poet-translator adequate to the
job is begining to translate Brod-
sky's poetry. Also, in 1973 a
Brodsky volume of the Penguin
series of Modern European Poets
will come out translated by
George L. Kline. Ann Arborites
should also be aware that in
three weeks at the Borders Book
shop Joseph Brodsky will partici-
pate in an autographing party
for the re-publication of the re-
cent Russian Tri-quarterly that
incl'ided a large section of his
work.

Al

Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
Joseph Brodsky

217 SASHLEY

'2RM -2AM

pNM

HELL, UPSIDE DOWN
survive-in
one of the
greatest escape
adventures ever!
PANAVISION@'
COLOR BY DELUXE®
NEXT: "SOUNDER"
_ y

It's classics with
a different touch

By DONALD SOSIN
Schubert/Mahler Lieder. Jess-
ye Norman, soprano, Irwin
Gage, piano. (Philips 6500 412)
Jessye Norman made her New,
York debut this month to good
notices, but she is no unfamiliar
voice to opera and lieder buffs.
She came to Ann Arbor in 1967
to study with Pierre Bernac, the
French baritone who was on the
faculty at the time. A year later
she won a first prize in the pres-
tigious Munich International
Competition; I was there at the
time, and it was clear that she
had a fabulous future. She went
on to become a member of the

"ONE OF THE MOST SATISFYING FILMS OF THE
YEAR! Sarah Miles brilliantly embodies both sex-
uality and inttlligence. Robert Mitchum, his finest
performance in many years. Trevor Howard, John
Mills and Leo McKern - all of them superb. A
NEAR-CLASSIC IN ITS STRUCTURE AND UNI-
VERSAL IN ITS HUMANITY!"
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine
" 4.' (highest rating) A MASTERPIECE!
DAVID LEAN IS A GENIUS!" -N.Y. Daily News

permanent company at the Ber-
lin Opera House, and has toured
all over Europe.
Philips has just released h e r
third recording. (The first, on
Odeon, contained songs of Wag-
ner, Schubert and Poulenc. The
second, on Philips, was the Mar-
riage of Figaro.)
One hears that Norman h a s
continued to grow as an artist,
refining her technique, but has
not reached a point of real mas-
tery. She has a superb control
of tone in the Schubert group,
which, with the exception of
"Ave Maria," contains rather un-
familiar songs.
Norman has a way with the
fiery, dramatic "Der Zwerg"
and the moody "Raste, Kreig-
er!" Her voice has great even-
ness in all registers, but she of-
ten is a shade below pitch, es-
pecially in the long sustained
notes of "Ave Maria."
She seems better suited to Mah-
ler, judging from the three songs
from "Des Knaben Wunderhorn'
and the two from Rueckert that
make up the flip side. "Ich Bin
der Welt Abhanden Gekommen"
is rich, dark, beautiful and to-
tally captivating, and in "Das
Irdische Leben" one hears some
coloristic devices that might
have been picked up from that
other marvelous Mahler singer,
Fischer-Dieskau.
Irwin Gage hadles the accom-
paniments sensitively and res-
ponds to Norman as one would

expect him to: he has played for
her for many years, and also
received some of his training at
the U-M School of Music.
Webern, Complete Music for
String Quartet. Quartetto Ital-
iano. (Phillips 6500 105)
Here is a wonderful opportun-
ity to become familiar with the
full range of Webern's musical
thought. The earliest work here,
the slow movement for s t r in g
quartet (1905) is a tonal, roman-
tic curiosity, leaving cadences
half completed, moving on to a
new key and tempo. Even though
the movement is long by We-
bern's later standards, it still
sounds as though it was created
out of fragments, as does h i s
later music. But below this sur-
face characteristic, there is the
same disciplined formal struc-
ture that one finds in the Five
Movements, Op. 5, and the Six
Bagatelles, * Op. 9. These two
sets are the most fascinating on
the disc. In their brevity (one of
the Op. 9 is but eight measures
long) is a virtual encyclopedia of
effects for string instruments,
yet the result is much more than
a sound effects catalogue, but
music of a biting, expressive na-
ture, delicate yet intense.
The Op. 28 String Quartet is a
shocking contrast to the early
works. The sharp limitation of
material, the concentration on
single notes, the avoidance spec-
ial effects represents, as Bernard
Jacobson's liner notes comment,
"the growth of a relentlessly self-
disciplined artist."

.I

WINNER OF 2
ACADEMY AWARDS

by the makers of
DOCTOR ZHIVAGO

METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER Presents
A story of love.
Filmed by David Lean
Ryanrs
Sar ROBERT MMCIUM TRE\OR HOWARD
CHRISTOPHER'JONES JOHNMILLS
LEO McKERN raSARAH MILES
METROCOC RM S

Peter Falk, Ben Gazzara, John Cassavetes in
'HUS
Written and Directed b y JOHN CASSAVETES

XAI
SOME OF OU
DAILY S
MON.-Cheeze
TUES. EVENING
Spaghetti W/

(
JR REGULAR
PECIALS
Soup
G-Whole Grain
Sauce

IN COLOR

Wed., Thur., Fri.-7:15 only
Ends Sat.-3:45 & 7:15

1 " H 'OPI
'' 761970k

II M - thv A

"HUSBANDSi

is

a great,

"Gazzaro, Falk and Cassavetes give the perform-

I

r

I

10

l l

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