100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1973 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, January 30, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

page Seven

Tuesday, January 30, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

M'

cagers

collapse contimues,

75-68

Bowl games excite
Wolverine gridders

By BOB HEUER
Special To The Daily
IOWA CITY - The Iowa Hawk-
eyes put another nail in the coffin
of Michigan's Big Ten title hopes
last night by pinning a bitter 75-68
loss on the Wolverines in a game
that ended prematurely when both
benches erupted after a last-second
foul.
With defeat sealed and final sec-
onds ticking off, Michigan's John
Lockard fouled Kevin Kunnert in
Sthe act of shooting. Lockard's foul,
a flimg -of the arm which caughtt
the seven-foot Hawkeye center,
flush in the face, brought both
players and fans onto the court.
With visions of the Minnesota-
Ohio State brawl of last year clear-
ly in rhind, the scuffle was broken
up with no punches thrown. The
game was then officially endedl
with one second left and the Iowa
team left the court with the shoot-
ing of Kunnert's free throw and,
subsequent technical foul ignored.
Moments earlier, Michigan Coach*
Johnny Orr had leapt to his feet,
protesting an uncalled Iowa goal-
tending violation.
Unable to get the referee's at-
tention after a Michigan foul stop-:
ped play, Orr stomped onto the
court, throwing a towel at the!
oblivious' official.
He was immediately slapped
with a technical and had to be re-
strained from .charging back onto
the court.
The game itself, which paled in
comparison to the extracurricular'

daily
i E i
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
RICH STUCK
activity, was decided at the free-
throw line, where the Iowans hit
ten straight as Michigan's frantic
full-court press brought a steady1
stream of fouls in the final few!
minutes.
Joe Johnson canned a fall-away
jumper to pull the Blue wthin one
at 51-50, with 7:58 remaining.,
Iowa's Rick Williams scored but
Henry Wilmore, who led Michigan
with20 points, countered that by
swishing a 25 footer.
Joe Johnson broke up the next
Hawkeye attack to give Michigan'
possession, but a Wilmore baseline
attempt missed and Ken Brady;
picked up his fourth personal foul.
in the scramble for the rebound.
The Big Fella was then saddled
with a technical when he protested
vociferously.
Willams made the free shot, but
Campy Russell's feedrunderneath
to Wilmore knotted the count at
54-all with 6:16 left.
From there, the teams traded
buckets until Kunnert's follow of a'
missed layup by Candy LaPrince'
gave Iowa a 60-58 edge with 2:52

left.
Michigan lost the ball after a
timeout and Iowa slowed things
down until Iowa's substitute Larry
Moore hit Neil Fegebank with a
perfect pass underneath. Fegebank
converted the layup to put the
Hawks in command, 62-58.
Wilmore sank two free throws to
close the gap, but when Michigan
pressured the inbounds pass, the
Hawkeyes quickly gained a two-
on-one break. As Reggie Vaughan
Swent inhfor a layup,Brady both
fouled him and goaltended the
shot.
The foul, Brady's fifth, and sub-
seun three-point play with 1:50
left on the clock forced the Wolver-
ines into playing a press-and-foul
game as Iowa paraded to the char-
ity stripe five times in the next
minute and a half, hitting 9 out of
a possible 10 free throws to put
the game away.
Except for a curt "I was just!
trying to get his attention," Orr I
had no comment on theitowel-
throwing incident. "We missed a
lot of shots" he imparted dejected-
ly. "We got the ball in there, but'
we didn't make them.'
The Wolverines came out on the
short end of a rebounding sta-
tistic they usually dominate, 55-40.
Kunnert led the Hawks in scoring
with 24 and rebounds with 17,:
while Russell balanced Michigan'
two-man show with 18 markers.

By RICH STUCK
A few of Michigan's senior footballers spent the recent holiday
break doing a little more than getting ready for today's pro draft.
Consider for example the day Paul Seymour tried throwing burning
matches at the girls' grass skirts during halftime of the Hula Bowl
game.
Seymour, the all-America tackle was only one of seven Wolver-
ines to appear in the many post-season college all-star contests. He
and Randy Logan played at the Hawaiian classic and the two of
them along with Fred Grambau participated in the East-West Shrine
game in San Francisco.
Tom Kee and Tom Coyle journeyed to Alabama for the Blue-Grey
game, while Bill Hart and Bo Rather played in the American Bowl
For those of you who are unfamiliar with such affairs, the prac-
tices are kept short and simple to allow the players the greatest
amount of free time possible. And according to Hart they "made the
most of it."
He should know. Bob Devaney of Nebraska was selected to be the
coach of the North team and when he arrived in Tampa after the
Orange Bowl game, he took a look at the practice schedule and
almost vomited. Hart says, "We really had it easy; only one practice
a day which lasted only 40 minutes. And NO pads. We didn't.even
put on the pads for pre-game warmup. The first time I hit anyone
all week was the first play of the game."
The practices were not 'full go' at the other sites either, although
some of the stars thought it best to bust their gut for a week. This
was seldom the case however as most of the players relaxed during
practice and did the heavy work at night. Grambau and Seymour
relate a tale that occurred in a local Frisco pub.
"We were standing around trying to act cool. As big as we are,
oto some people started coming up to us and asking for our auto-
graphs. We thought, what the hell, so we signed 'em."
The unusual part of that story however is that they did not sign
eand their real name's. "I signed mine 'Big Daddy Lipscomb' and Fred
ad used 'Mean Joe' Greene as his name," Seymour laughs.
Coyle's trip to the Blue-Grey game was also a chance for a good
time to be had. "We all had an older sponsor to take us around
and show us the sights. They weren't squares .at all, though. They
got us dates and took us to the bars."
The all-star camps also provide the players a good opportunity
to become aquainted with the guys they had played against during
their college careers. For instance, Hart's roommate was Ohio
State halfback Rick Galbos. He also got to know Rich Glover of
Nebraska well, commenting, "He is really a great guy to party with."
inutes If anyone saw the rain-drenched Hula Bowl from Honolulu, the
teams vision of the players having a good time was not an illusion. While
stern Chris Schenkel kept commenting on how sad the players were in
lead. not having a fast, dry track, the players themselves actually enjoyed
lead it.
n five Seymour put it aptly, saying, "Playing in the mud isn't all that
f, but bad. I had a good time. A friend of mine from South Carolina, John
inutes LeHeup, was playing directly across from me. I can remember
it the some plays where we'd help each other up and just break up
se as laughing. In fact," he concludes, "the last few plays of the game we
.h started throwing big globs of mud at each other."
f Aht Football players ARE human after all, aren't they.

Switzer new Sooner coach;
Goyette gets Islander's axe
By The Associated Pressz
NORMAN, Okla.-Barrey Switzer, architect of Oklahoma's
record-breaking Wishbone offense, was chosen yesterday to succeed
Chuck Fairbanks as the Sooners' head coach.

Brady
Wilmore
Russell
J. Johnson
E. Johnson
Kupec
Lockard
Britt
Team
Totals

Hawkeyed
MICHIGAN
FG F
3-11 2
7-18 6
8-24 2
5-10 0
2-6 0
1-2 02
2-3 2
0-0 0

T
2-2
6-6
-4
0-0
0-0
0-1
-2
0-0

Kunnert

The first pick?
Today is the annual NFL players' draft and Dave Butz, shown here, may be the first man chos
Several Michigan gridders are expected to be picked, among them All-Americans Randy Logan a
Paul Seymour.
BOILERS BOP 'CATS
GopherS-4bite Bdgr

vsaN a Maa. VYaaa V {.lV 4a1V VVV11V1.1 11--- ---V21"
G LaPrinee
Switzer, .35, was the unanimous choice of a search committee willllams
named by Dr. Paul Sharp, school president, to choose a successor for Collins
Fegebank
Fairbanks, who resigned Friday to become head coach and general Angelino
manager of the New England Patriots of the National l ootball League. ! Parker
* * * Moore
j Vaughn

28-74
IOWA
FG
10-15
1-8
4-8
2-6
1-3
0-1
1-2
1-5

12-14
FT
4-8
6-7
1-1
2-2
4-6
0-0
0-0
5-7
3-3

R TP
11 8
5 20
8 18
0 10
4 4
1 2
5 6
0 0
6
40 68
R TP
17 24
1 8
6 11
7 10
6 8
1 2
10
1 7
2 5
13

MADISON, Wis. - Minnesota's
swarming defense and Clyde Turn-
er's hot hand propelled the Golden
Gophers to an 81-64 Big Ten bas-
ketball victory over Wisconsin last
night.
Turner poured in 21 points as
the defending Big Ten champions
won in a rout over the hapless
Badgers who slumped to a 1-6
mark.
The victory was Minnesota's 13th
in 15 starts and upped its confer-
ence record to 3-2.
Dominating both boards, the ag-
gressive Gophers had seven and
eight-point spurts in the early go-
ing and surged to a 24-8 margin

with 12 minutes gone.
Minnesota held a 39-22 halftime
margin and maintained that spread
during most of the second half.
The bigger Gopher players intimi-
dated Badgers throughout most of
the game, forcing them to take
long shots.
Minnesota hit 49 per cent of its
shots to Wisconsin's 34 per cent in
the first half, but the Gophers big
advantage came on the boards
where they grabbed 27 to Wiscon-
sin's 17 rebounds.
"We've got enough rebounding
strength to board with any team
in America," said Minnesota coach
Bill Musselman.

slowly and with only six mi
left -in the first half, the 1
were tied at 14-14. From t
Purdue outscored Northw
20-7, taking a 34-21 halftimel
The Boilermakers' biggest
was 15 points, 44-29, less than
minutes into the second half
by the time six more m
passed, Northwestern had cu
lead to 50-44. That was a clo
the Wildcats ever got.
Purdue scored eight str
points in the last minute of
game to get the final 76-62
The victory gave Purdue, r
second in Big Ten standings,
conference record and an o

* NEW YORK-The New York Islanders, who have made very
little noise on the National Hockey League ice this season, stole some'
of the pre-game thunder from the NHL's 26th Ann Staf Game.
While 40 of the top players in the league were arriving in New
York for tonight's All Star show, the Islanders announced a change in
coaches with Phil Goyette moving off the hot spot and Earl Ingarfield
stepping onto it.

Team

Totals 25-63 25-34 55 75
SCORE BY PERIODS
MICHIGAN 38 30-68
Iowa 39 36--75
Officials: Tom Ballaban, Edwin
Gyenes, James Robinson.
Attendance: 12,914
Fouled Out: Michigan: E. Johnson,
Russell, Brady.
Technical Fouls: Michigan 2.

score.
anked
a 5-1
verall

U

ait.. 01F i77 - -A A T m e VT H UCULS,

*BALTIMORE-The Baltimore Colts, continuing to wheel and
deal, traded three more veterans yesterday and moved into an ad- K.C., D.C. NAMED:
vantageous position for the National Football League draft.
"We're sure to come up with a super draftee," General Manager N H
Joe Thomas said after he acquired the No. 2 pick in Tuesday's draft p lan s,
by sending defensive end Billy Newsome to New Orleans for the Saints'
In addition to Newsome, Thomas continued to clean house at the NEW YORK (iP) - The National
end of his first season in Baltimore by swapping center Bill Curry to Hockey League's Board of Gover-;
the Houston Oilers for guard Tom Regner and a third-round choice, and nors gave the go-ahead yesterday1
running back Norm Bulaich to the Philadelphia Eagles for "undis- to new franchises in Kansas City
closed draft choices," and Washington.
drsThe two franchises had been
.:. :. .:.... granted conditionally last June,'
making yesterday's move a mere,
Professional League Standings formality allowing them to con-
tinue with organizational plans toj
NBA Philadelphia at Buffalo join the league for the 1974-75 sea-

"Ithn sm popear o-;tally of 12 and 4. The Wildcats,
"in t inkdometeoplesrego ranked eighth in the Big Ten have
ing tofihndsoe eo trog w a 1-4 conferencetrecord andh3-11
are," he observed, season mark.
"We're just starting to reach
our momentum.":,.:....:,..... ..

expansion,
Bruce Norris, chairman of the
board of the NHL, said, "Both
groupsahave made excellent pro-
gress and we are satisfied to this
point that all requirements for a
conditional franchise have been
met."

** *

Big Ten

Standings I

Purdue p nrksf

i
,
it
1:

Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L
Boston 40 9
New York 43 12
Buffalo 16 34
Philadelphia 4 49
Central Division
Baltimore 32 18
Atlanta 29 25
Houston 20 31
Cleveland 18 32
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 37 14
Chicago 31 19
K.C.-Omaha 25 31
Detroit 20 31
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 39 11
Golden State 32 19
Phoenix 25 27
Seattle 16 38
Portland 13 39
Yesterday's Game
New York 97, Golden State 83
Only game scheduled
Today's Games
Golden State at Baltimore

Pet. GB
.816
.781 -
.320 24
.075 38
.640 -
.537 5
.392 121,-
.360 14
.725 -
.620 5%j
.446 14 y
.192 17
.780 -
.629 7!2
.481 15
.296 25
.250 27

Detroit at Atlanta
Milwaukee at Cleveland
Chicago at Los Angeles
Houston at Portland
Only games scheduled

Montreal
N. Y. Rangers
Boston
Buffalo
Detroit.
Toronto
Vancouver
N. Y. Islanders

NHL
East
W L T
32 7 11
33 13 4
30 15 4
25 17 7
24 19 7
16 26 7
14 30 7
6 40 4
West
28 17 5
23 21 7
22 19 8
21 22 9
21 23 7
19 21 9
20 25 6
9 28 12

Pts GF GA
75 205 113
70 196 126
64 210 152
57 177 143
55 162 158
39 152 166
35 145 213
16 101 232
61 190 148
53 177.177
52 156 146
51 140 146
49 158166
47 141 156
46 172 174
30 139 205
at Madison

son.
Kansas City's situation had been
clouded by the refusal of voters
in Johnson County, Kan., to ap-
prove funds for construction of a
new arena. But that problem was
solved last week when the Kansas
City, Mo., City Council approved
a $5.5-million bond issue to build
an arena in the city's stockyards
section.
The Washington, D.C., arena is
already under construction on a
site in Prince Georges County,
Md., a Washington suburb.

SCORES
NBA
New York 97, Golden State 84
COLLEGE
Florida St. 95, S. Florida 53
E. Kentucky 77, Tenn. Tech 66
Purdue 76, Northwestern 62
Miss. St. 90, Georgia 84
Rutgers 100, Scranton 58
Minnesota 81, Wisconsin 64
Marshall 85, N. Carolina A&T 66
Oklahoma 65, Louisiana Tech 63
Florida 65, Mississippi 59
New Haven 74, Jerser' City 62
WHA
Cleveland 3, New England 2

I.

I

&V L Pct.
WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. -Af- Indiana 5 0 1.000
ter a slow start here last night, ,IPurdue 5 1 .833
Purdue picked uip steam and beat Illinois5 1 .837
Big Ten foe Northwestern76-62, innsota 2 0
in college basketball action. MICHIGAN 4 3 .571
Top scorer for the game was Ohio State 2 2 .500
Northwestern's Greg Wells with Michigan St. 2 4 .333
16 points. Wildcat Jim Wallace Iowa 2 4 .333
scored 10. Northwestern 1 4 .200
The game started out very Wisconsin 1 6 .143
SUB-STANCE
A review of theory
and literary criticism
No, 4 D
No ~* POETICS
Essays
Theory
*Beyond Structuralism
AT
BORDERS
CENTICORE $1. r
(South Univ
4028 MLB
F-

Chicago
Philadelphia
Minnesota
Atlanta
Los Angeles
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
California

_........... .

SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE
Everyone. Welcome

Today's Garhe
East-West All-Star Game
Square Garden.

"THE MUMMERS"
A Photographic Documentary
by JOHN SCHO T T
ON DISPLAY at the Union Gallery
from Jan. 24-Feb. 1
Also: New Prints and Photographs

1t o w ;r

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
LOTS OF FOOD

-/
I ~ m * e
- -
University Towers
Apartments offers
Eight month leases with
no rent increase

LOTS{

OF PEOPLE

I'LL

Ist Floor

Hours: 12-5 Wed.-Sun.

MICHIGAN UNION

7-10 p.m. Fri.

i

COMPARE
'73 CELICA "ST"
2 Dr. Hardtop

LSA
coffee Hour
TUESDAY
3:00-4:30
January 30
Philosophy Department

r

(University) MINI COURSE 412
1 CREDIT
Begins Monday, February 5
8 P.M., 2408 Mason Hall !

AIR CONDITIONED, AUTOMATIC TRANS.,
POWER DISC BRAKES, RADIAL TIRES, TINTED
(;l ACC LJ ATE) D(AD \A/lKIMnfl\A/ 1l II INTRIL

" Free weekly housekeeping
Study room
* Piano room
0 Heated Pool

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan