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January 25, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-25

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 25, 1973

Page Figh THE MICIGA AL

Thu..r,,frsday ..... Jauar 2. 1973X I . s

I

Pact gains claimed

DAILY OFF'IAL BULLETIN

I

(Continued from Page 1)
forces from the South as a "victory
for the Vietnamese people."
Hanoi has throughout the Viet-I
nam conflict refused to formally
acknowledge the presence of its,
soldiers in South Vietnam. Its
propaganda referred to the Viet
Cong and its own troops together
as "liberation" forces.
Tho also said that the govern-
ment reached this week was in no
substantial way different from thef
settlement he and Kissinger work-'
ed out last October.
Tho claimed the bombing had,
forced no major concessions from{
the Communists. Kissinger as ex-
pected rejected this claim.
In Saigon President Thieu warned
that the settlement did not repre-
sent a permanent peace and he
told his people that the question of
finding a political solution in South
Vietnam remained unanswered.
The details of the procedures to
be used in exchanging prisoners
and signing the final agreement
was also announced yesterday.
According to the full 12-page
agreement and the four accom-
panying explanatory and technical
documents, the settlement will be
signed in three different cere-'
monies this Saturday in Paris.
Within 15 days of the signing
the first American POW will be
picked up in Hanoi by American
personnel in American planes,
with the entire contingent of 587
U.S. captives-473 in North Viet-
nam, 108 in the South and six in
Laos-to be released at about two
week intervals for two months.
The withdrawal of the last 24,000
American troops remaining in
South Vietnam will begin and con-
tinue at a similar rate.
The cease-fire initially will be
limited to Vietnam, because of
complexities in the other two Indo-
china nations.
But Kissinger added that "It is
our firm expectation that within a
short period of time there will be
a formal cease-fire in Laos.
As to Cambodia, the Presiden-

tial adviser said "it is our expec-
tation that a de facto cease-fire will
come into being over a period of
time relevant to the execution of
this agreement."
Northwood
battles 'U
(Continued from Page 1)
that the plan lacked mention of a
day care center. There are 1,430
children in Northwood housing,
two-thirds of them below school
age.
Although Feldkamp did not pro-i
mise day care space in the cen-
ter, he did not rule out the possi-
bility.
Questioning on the subject con-
tinued until one woman remarked,
"Politically he can't come right
out and say there will be a day
care center or the Regents will
never pass it!"
Another major concern was the
amount of what the tenants called
"unnecessary space in the plans."
"People are quite frankly saying
that you are building this center
for administrative purposes;" said
one man.
Feldkamp replied, "You're get-
ting hung up on a lobby and wait-
ing center.
Administrative space, according
to Henry Johnson, vice-president
for student services, will be some
''minuscule area that deals with
married housing." Those offices
are presently located in two apart-
ments which Feldkamp pointed out
would be "freed up" if the center
is built.
The plan is awaiting final ap-
proval from the Plan Extension
Board and then Regental agree-
ment. If it is passed, building will
begin "in the very near future,"
according to Johnson.
Another meeting will be held
Sunday at 7:30 p.m. in the old mail
room of Bishop Housing.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 25
DAY CALENDAR
Women's Forum Lunch (brown bag)
Meeting: Nellie varner, dir., Affirma-
tive Action Prog., Homer Heath
Lounge, Union, noon.
Maternal & Child Health Film Ser-
=es= "The Growth & Development of a
Multihandicapped Infant" "I Have an
Egg," 5318 SPH, noon.
Psychiatry, MHRI Lecture: R. Guil-
lery, U. of Wis., "A Mutation that
Alters the Sensory Representations in
the Brain," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 pm.
Geol. & Mineralogy Journal Club:
R. Nicholas, Shell Oil, New Orleans,
"Evolution of the Paleozoic Cratonic
Margin-Southwestern Mid-Continent,"
1505 C. C. Little Bldg., 4 pm.,
Student Lab Theatre: "An Original
Affair," & "Revolving Door," Arena
Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 4 pm.
Mathematics: R. Browne, "A Theory
of Set-Complexes for Music," 3210 An-
gell, 4 pm.
International Night: Food of the
Netherlands & Belgium, League Cafe-
teria, 5 pm.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 764-4430
The Federal Government Teacher
Corps has two programs: 1) Indian pro-
grams in Alaska, U. of S. Dakota,
Wash., Mont., & Colo. 2) Corrections,
to rehabilitate young offenders, in Ill.,
Conn., Ga., N. Y. City, Los Angeles,
Ore., wis., N. J. Grad, work simul-
taneously at nearby universities to
.earn MAT degree and teacher certifi-

cation. Write for application: Pro-
grams Branch, Teachers Corps, UI. S.
Office of Education, Washington, D.
C. 20202.
One-year Master's degree in Library
at U. of Toledo offers new program:
Community Information Specialist
with field experience in social agencies
and gov't.
The State of virginia offers a one-
year Admin. Intern Program in per-
sonnel, budgeting, planning. BA in any
major. Applications available in CP&P,
Deadline March 16.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 SAB
ANNOUNCEMENT
U. S. Dept, of Commerce, washing-
ton, D. C. Summer Intern Program
Scx;al and Economic Statistics Admin.
for students completing Bachelor's in
June, interested in quantitative work
in the various economic and demo-
graphic fields. Further details avail,
American Zionist Youth Foundation,
N. Y. 1973 Israel Summer Programs
announced. Program includes work,
study, theater, medical, drama and
study group workshops - broad pro-
grams. Details available.
Council on International Educa-
tional Exchange, N. Y. Info on Summer
Jobs in Britain and Australia. Full de-
tails avail.
ATTENTION: The final application
date for taking the Summer Federal
Exam for 1973 is Jan. 26. Any applica-
tions received after that date will not
be accepted.

11

4

z1

Jewish Community Service
Students wanted for challenging training
and career opportunities'in American Jew-
ish Communal organizations. Scholarships
and placement assistance available.
Information: Jonathan EntinHillel 663-4129

AP Photo
PRESIDENT NIXON meets yesterday with Congressional leaders to discuss the Vietnam peace agreement. Those shown from left: Sen-
ate Minority Leader Hugh Scott (R-Pa.), Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.), President Nixon and House Minority Leader
Gerald Ford (R-Mich.).

BOMBING CONTINUES:
F i g still on

.

r td

in S. Vietnam

COMPARE
'73 CELICA "ST"

(Continued from Page 1) #
How much territory each sideI
holds at the time of the cease-fire
will thus have significant reper-
cussions on the eventual politi-
cal settlement that emerges in the
South.'
There was a definite increase in
Communist activity during the 24
hours ending at 4 p.m. yesterday,
military sources said.
There were 116 Communist-
initiated incidents, 80 of which

were shellings, around the coun- curity crackdown for the week
try during that period, they said. end before the cease-fire.
It was the highest level since 98 One report from a senior gov-
were reported Jan. 7. ernment source said a two-day
Thirteen B52 strikes hit west of curfew will be imposed in the
Quang Tri City, 404 miles north countryside and smaller cities in'
of Saigon. The demolished provin- contested areas to strengthen the
cial capital is believed one of the government's control and head off
prime targets of North Vietnamese last-minute armed activity by the
Viet Cong units in any land-grab- North Vietnamese and local guer-
bing assault. rilla forces.
The Saigon government yester- In a first stage of the crack-
day was reported planning a se- down, Saigon radio announced a

Ecol Ogy advocates attempt to
keep hamburger eyesore' out

tightening of the regular 11 p.m.
to 6 a.m. curfew hours in the Sai-
gon area, listing heavy fines for
violations and saying offending
S o u t h Vietnamese servicemen
would be subject to "maximum
disciplinary action."
Order
Your
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Today
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NOW SHOWING
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$3882
total del. price inc. tax, lic. & title
TOYOTA ANN ARBOR, Inc.
907 N. Main 769-7935

41

(Continued from Page 1)
Another common bond uniting
most opponents of the Burger King
is their unceasing criticism ofj
Ginos - a nearby fast-food estab-
lishment known for its garish ap-
pearance. One commission mem-
ber referred to it as "our biggest
mistake."
At the time of its construction,j
Ginos aroused a good deal of
public controversy as its develop-
ments necessitated destroying a
picturesque white house that was
only weeks short of becoming an
official landmark.
Since that time, however, chang-
es have been made in city laws,
which many people feel may pre-
vent a similar decision on the
proposed Burger King. The most
significant of these changeswas
the passage last spring of the Sub-
division Control Ordinance.
Under the provisions of that act,
all proposed building on commer-
cial sites must be discussed at a
public hearing before the Planning
Commission. The commission then
must make a recommendation to
the City Council, whose approval
is necessary for any construction
to begin.
Prior to last spring, a builder
COMMUNITY
SWITCHBOARD
THURS., JAN. 25
OPEN MEETING
for New Volunteers
7:30 p.m
SAB--3524

who met zoning and safety re-
quirements could proceed with
his project immediately.
Passage of the bill was gener-
ally attributed to the growing in-
terest many city residents have
shown in the development of the
downtown area, in particular, and
in ecological causes in general.
If Council denies a developer ap-
proval to build, which in this case
seems likely ,the decision can still
be overturned in court.
Just how low the status of the
COMING
TON ITE
9:30 P.M.-MODERN
LANGUAGES AUD. 111
"AESTHETICALLY AND AURALLY
STUNNING. PROVIDES MOMENTS
OF UNFORGETTABLE BRILLIANCE,"
(N). York Mgazie)"AN ELECTRIFYING AND
ELECTRiFIED PICTURE," .(wYn)
BY D.PENNEBAKER
FILMED AT THE MONTEREY INTERNATIONAL POP FESTIVAI,
A LEACOCK PENNEBAKER RELEASE In Color
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP
761-8522

fast-food business in the city has
sunk was evidenced by the re-
marks Tuesday night of Dick Ber-
ger, president of Ann Arbor To-
morrow, a planning organization.
"My name is Berger," he be-
gan, "and I'm happy to say that
it's spelled with an 'e' and not
with a 'u'."

LAW SCHOOL
MIXER

WILD'S

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IN

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Friday, January

26

TO ALL YOU STUDENTS WHO HAVE
GRIPED THIS YEAR ABOUT OUR
CONCERTS
SPEAKERS-
HOMECOMING
ACTIVITIES IN GENERAL
HERE IS YOUR CHANCE TO DO
SOMETHING ABOUT IT!
PETITION TO BE A SENIOR OFFICER OF
THE UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
Petitioning open Jan. 15 through
4:30 Jan. 26 at the UAC office,
2nd Floor, Michigan Union.

9-12
Featuring: Joust Unlimited
LAWYERS' CLUB LOUNGE
S. State at South University
non-law students: 50c

II

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_.

Jesse Winchester
Third Down, 110to Go
Bearsville album BR 2102
An American exiled in Canada,
he's finally followed up his choice
first album, JESSE WINCHESTER,
with this equally choice LP, pro-
duced mostly by himself, but part-
ly by the ubiquitous Todd Rund-
gren.

v;T"ur;ET T

#11t 11b *i4wic Ijapt
in connection with
MAESTRO JUAN SERRANO
is currently offering a limited number of PRIVATE
FLAMENCO GUITAR LESSONS. Lessons will be
offered on a first come basis and {are limited to
Monday and Friday only.
Be Sure to See
MR. JUAN SERRANO
in concert TONIGHT

Frankie & Johni
The Sweetheart
Sampler
Warner Bros. album 85
Frankie and Johnny ar
Ruby and John Paul I
play guitar and bass
z< '. ..<::: <>,and have spent the las
doing so in Al Kooper

any

I

s 2675
e Frank and
Fetta. They
respectively,
st two years
's band.
:r.

4

Produced by Al Kooper

University Cellar

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