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January 23, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-23

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.Page Eiggi

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, January 23, 1973

Page E1g1i~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday. Ja - nuary..,2..1973.. ,

Supreme Court ruling seen as
victory for abortion backers

LBJ associates express sorrow
(Continued fromPage1) and warmth, made the idea of his Albert's statement said "I have
for him do their very best, and passing somehow unbelievable," never been closer to anyonein
they did so because they wanted Agnew said in a statement last high political office in my entire
to." night. life. I have lost a very dear
"He was an easy, yet a hard "His m a n y accomplishments friend."
man to work for," added Cohen, speak fully for themselves. In time Sen. Barry Goldwater, the man
"because he was so exacting and his countrymen will come to fully Johnson swamped in 1964 in one
compulsive. He was very energic appreciate them," Agnew added. of the greatest political triumphs
when it came to the domestic field. Senate Democratic leader Mike of American history, said of his
He had a great desire to improve Mansfield, a longtime associate 1964 White House opponent:
tehealth and ed~rn in thi txhn ~,r- i

m

--

Photographic Filter
REDUCTION

By JAN BENEDETTI
Both local abortion supporters
and opponents were stunned yes-
terday by the Supreme Court's
landmark decision that states
may not bar a woman from
having an abortion during the
first three months of pregnancy.
The implications of the ruling
are still unclear, according to
legal experts and local medical
officials interviewed yesterday
by The Daily.
Attorney Jean King, active in
abortion reform organizations,
was "delighted" by the decision,
though she said the states can
still pass forms of abortion leg-
islation.
According to King, the state
could require the father's con-
sent or may be able to draft
legislation to protect the fetus.
i"We'll have to sit 'and study.
the opinion for quite awhile.
Even if a state adds a provision
for the father's consent is added,
there's a good chance that it

could be overturned as a re-
quirement for abortions during
the first three months of preg-
nancy," she said.
Though a woman must have
her doctor's consent, the deci-
sion, however, virtually legalizes
abortions on demand. "It'll be
very easy to find doctors that'll
approve it," King said.
According to King, anti-abor-
tion groups are planning to press
for a constitutional amendment
prohibiting abortions.
John Steele, a member of the
campus anti-abortion Students in
Defense of Life, said, "It threw
us for a loop at first. But it's
just another thing we'll have to
work with. Supreme Court de-
cisions have been reversed. If
people know the risks involved
in abortion and the fact that it's
a human life, we believe a lot of
people will come around."
The organization is affiliated
with the National Youth Pro-Life
Coalition.
Though the group has "no plan

High Court ruling favors
liberalized abortion law

(Continued from Page 1)
Rehnquist said he felt the court
was stretching the right of priv-
acy to an impermissible extent.
White wrote, "The court appar-
ently values the convenience of
the pregnant mother more than
the continued existence and de-
velopment of the life or potential
life which she carries."
The court did not deal with the
question of the father's consent
for an abortion.
Reaction to the decision was
predictable. Abortion supporters
were pleased and abortion foes
were angered .
The Women's National Abor-
tion Action Coalition called the de-
cision a significant victory for the
abortion rights movement through-
out the world.'
In Philadelphia, Cardinal John
Fuel crisis
may hit 'U'
(Continued from Page 1)
-Rescheduling evening classes
to close the otherwise unused
buildings; and.
-Possibly closing some struc-
tures completely.
However, Jack Weidenbach, di-
rector of physical properties and
plant extensions, cautions that "if
the suppliers who supply us oil
deliver it, then the crisis is not
going to have any effect."
Weidenbach said that interested
parties were meeting this week to
discuss the problem.
Meanwhile, students are urged
to lower their room temperatures
and keep windows closed, and to
use less hot water and lights.
But if worse comes to worst,
there may be a few frigid weeks
ahead. As one person asked The
Daily yesterday, "Can you guys
type with your mittens on?"

Krol, president of the National
Conference of Catholic Bishops,
said in a statement the decision
"is an unspeakable tragedy for
the nation."
The ruling touched off a dispute
among legislators in Arizona.
Rep. D. Lee Jones said, "Like
everything else, people's ideas
change."
"People's ideas change, but
God's don't," countered Rep.
James Cooper.
Meanwhile in Michigan State
House Speaker William Ryan said
the legislature will have to work
on new abortion laws to regulate
abortions after the three-month
period.
"I really don't know how far
we'll go with it," Ryan said.
"We're going to have to have dis-
cussions with both sides on this.
It may be that the pro-side is con-
tent enough with this ruling and
will agree to restrictions after
three months."
Ryan has consistently opposed
abortion liberalization in the leg-
islature.
Maurice Reizen, the state's Pub-
lic Health Director, said the De-
partment of Public Health may
ask the governor for emergency
power to promulgate abortion reg-
ulations..
He said he feels the public must
be protected from a possible "pro-
liferation of abortion mills."
The department already has a
comprehensive set of guidelines
covering legalized abortion which
was set to go. into effect if the
abortion referendum passed at the
polls last Nov. 7. When the refer-
endum was defeated, the rules
were shelved.

of attack right now, we'll con-
tinue with our problem pregnan-
cy counseling and wait to see the
national organization's plan,"
said Steele.
According to a University Hos-
pital spokesman, the ruling "is
not expected to have any signifi-
cant immediate influence" on
hospital policy.
"Routine abortions would bet-
ter be referred to an independent
not-yet-operational community
family planning agency which
would act as a referral service.
The hospital does not have suf-
ficient facilities at the present
time to divert to the demand for
routine abortions," according to
J. Robert Willson, chairman of
the Department of Obstetrics and
Gynocology.
The hospital would continue to
limit abortions to complicated
problem cases (including dia-
betic mothers or women who are
apt to have complications result-
ing from an abortion).
When asked if the hospital
would refuse a request from a
staff physician to perform a
routine abortion, a hospital
spokesman said he did not think
a routine abortion would be re-
fused, but hospital policy would
be limited, for the most part, to
complicated cases.
The Regents rejected at their
December meeting a motion to
buy the University Motel and
lease it to a family planning or-
ganization. Before the abortion
referendum failed in November,
the organization planned to set
up a community abortion service.
According to Allan Smith, vice
president for academic affairs,
the Regents' refusal "was not
related to the failure of the ref-
erendum, but to the question of
whether the University is in the
landlord business or the educa-
tion business. I doubt that the
question will be revitalized now."
John Comiskey, administrator
of St. Joseph's Mercy Hospital,
said, "We'll have to see the de-
cision and have our attorney go
over it." St. Joseph's is run by
the Catholic Sisters of Mercy.
The hierarchy of the Catholic
Church has opposed abortion re-
form and worked for the defeat
of the state abortion referendum
last November.
Health Service Director Rob-
ert Anderson said, "We would
find it impossible to handle
abortions with the facilities we
have. I would like to see the stu-
dent needs handled in a com-
munity service."
The Health Service operates
a problem pregnancy referral
service. Spokespersons for other
local referral agencies, includ-
ing the Women's Crisis Center
and the Office of Religious Af-
fairs (ORA) said yesterday they
will revise their abortion referral
policies.
Though both groups in the
past referred women to other
states for abortions, spokesper-
sons said they will, in wake of
the ruling, investigate state
clinics as they open.

U1 1Cd1 1 AI.L . IU U11in I Lis
country."
Meanwhile, Vice President Spiro
Agnew led the initial national
mourning from the nation's cap-
ital following the stunning news of
Johnson's death, talling him a man
of courage and integrity.
"President Johnson's death .
comes as a severe shock. His
strength and vitality, his liveliness

Johnson dead at age 64

(Continued from Page 1)
37-year political career in a dra-
matic but abortive attempt to
halt the war.
"I shall not seek-and will not
accept - the nomination of my
party for anotherterm as your
President," he said on March
31, 1968 in a statement that sent
shock-waves through the nation.
At the same time, he an-
nounced a halt in the bombing of
most of North Vietnam and ask-
ed for a peace-making response
from Hanoi.
His unexpected statement led
to Vietnam peace talks in Paris.
It also exposed the Democratic
Party to a fierce fight for a new
presidential candidate, a fight
which ended with the election of
Republican Richard Nixon as
President.
Johnson said he endured the
"horrors of hell" as President.
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He said he was always vulner-
able as President to "make the
mistake of involving the world
in war."
In fact, he said the happiest
political job he ever had was as
Majority Leader in the U.S.
Senate.
Many Americans regarded the
ex-President as a tragic figure
even though his landslide victory
over Arizona Senator Barry Gold-
water in 1964 gave him a ma-
jority of 15 million popular votes,
largest in American history.
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
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poetry, and music.
or writing feature
stories a bo ut the
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Editor, c/o The
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Michigan Daily.

wno succeeaed Johnson as his
party leadersin the Senate, said
"I'm deeply sorry. Of all the Pres-
idents, he has done the most do-
mestically. I am saddened by his
loss."
House Speaker Carl Albert, an-
other longtime congressional asso-
ciate of the 36th President, was
described by aides as "very, very
upset" at the news.

"The country has lost a great
political leader, a dedicated Ameri-
can and I have lost a friend, the
memory of whose friendship I will
forever hold close."
In spite of the statements of
sorrow from political foes, former
Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortasa
said he could not avoid feeling
"deep and bitter resentment" atI
the hostile critics of Johnson.
Fortas, one of Johnson's closest
friends and the man Johnson tried
unsuccessfully to name as chief
justice, said "This is a man who
contributed more to his country
than any living person .
"I cannot avoid at this moment
feeling deep and bitter resentment
of those who were so hostile and
sharp in their criticism of him."
The thought that Johnson'shrepu-
tation will be praised by history
ran through other reactions, in-
cluding that from the Senate's sen-
ior Republican, George Aiken of
Vermont.
"History will be very good to
him," Aiken said. "That's true be-
cause of the work he did here in
the United States and even though
the war in Vietnam went tempo-
rarily against him."
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Information: Jonathan Entin, Hillel 663-4129

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