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January 21, 1973 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-01-21

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Rage Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 21, 1973

Nixon predicts 'era of peace'--,
in second inaugural address IJonathan

(Continued from Page 1)
cherished birthright of e v e r y
American."
In much the same context, Nix-
on said four years ago:
"We cannot learn from one an-
other until we stop shouting at one
another - until we speak quietly
enough so that our words can be
heard as well as our voices."
Four years ago, Nixon express-
ed belief in American youth, de-
scribing them as "better educat-
ed, more passionately driven by
conscience than any generation in
our history."
While Nixon did not refer spe-
Inaugural
dissonance
(Continued from Page 1)
Not far away, Ann Arbor Mayor
Robert Harris, a Democrat, march-
ed to the Washington monument a
few feet in front of the Human
Rights Party banner.
Yesterday in Washington was at
once confused and precise, full of
red banners and red, white and
blue ones, SDS members, and
Jesus freaks.
Perhaps the most interesting
item this weekend in Washington
however was the announcement
that the perpetual motion pendulum
in the Smithsonian Institution
stopped last night while workmen
set up decorations for the inaugural
ball.

cifically to youth yesterday, he a thronged ball room of cheering
did say: republicans:
"Our children have been taught "This is the biggest inaugural
to be ashamed of their country, " ball we've ever know in Washing-
ashamed of their parents, asham- ton, the President told his admir-
ed of America's record at home ers. "30,000 people in several lo-
and its role in the world." cations."
After reviewing the inaugural Nixon's five minute jocular ad-
parade, Nixon attended the inaug- dress was in contrast to the ear-
ural ball taking place in five loca- lier addrerss of Vice President
tions around the city. At the Sold- Spiro Agnew. In typical Agnew
iers Pension Building where the style the Vice President said the
host list was headed by former De- republicans had won because "the
fense Secretary Melvin Laird and majority of Americans would
Agriculture Secretary Earl Butz rather believe the commander and
Nixon made an appearance before ( chief than enemy propagandists."
Haig returns from talks

I

1

PRESIDENTIAL AIDE Henry Kissinger has little luck stifling a yawn yesterday while waiting for
President Nixon to be sworn in for a second term.

(Continued from Page 1)
of North Vietnam are to resume
their top-level secret discussions
Tuesday in Paris in what officials
have indicated could be the ses-
sion that turns out an accord to
end the war.!
The White House, the source of
earlier optimistic predictions that
t failed to materialize, said Kiss-
inger and Tho are resuming their
talks "for the purpose of com-
* pleting the text of an agreement."
That and a declaration by For-
eign Minister Tran Van Lam that
tthe conclusion is "quite closed"
have generated a general feeling
in Saigon that a cease-fire will be
announced soon, perhaps within
two weeks.
U. S. and South Vietnamese of-

ficials declined to fix a timetable
for a halt in the fighting. But they
did nothing to discourage talk of a
cease-fire as early as the end of
next week.
U. S. and North Vietnamese
technical experts continued their
discussion in Paris on the detailed
application of principles discussed
by Kissingertand Tho. Their talks
were reported concentrating on
the operation of a cease-fire, a
subject on which Saigon has ex-
pressed some reservations.
Lam said Friday Saigonhwanted
more "clarification about how the
cease-fire is going to be imple-
mented."

50,000 protest in Washington

(Continued from Page 1) oranges and verbal assaults at
ed only around 2,000 people. The Nixon as his car rode down Penn-
SDS rally and subsequent march, ! sylvania Ave.
however, were both peaceful. None of the projectiles however,
The real stars of protest show hit the President. One unidentified
were the Yippies, who split off man rushed across police lines and
from the SDS march dragging dashed towards Nixon's car, but
their own counter - inaugural float he was quickly contained by se-
-a 15 foot rat. Police, who said cret servicemen and District Po-
the rat was taking up too much lice
street space, skirmished with Yip-
pies for control of the rodent, with Virtually all protest action ended
the law winning out in the end. at around 5:30 p.m. The anti-Nixon
Demonstrators were for the demonstrations were generally
most part kept far away from the viewed as successful as the coordi-
route of the main inaugural pa- nating groups had not expected
rade. Some managed to get more than 25,000 to demonstrate.
through to hurl light bulbs, rotten Information for this story was sup-
Today's staff:
News: Gordon Atcheson, Linda Dreeben, Ted Evanoff, Cheryl
Pilate, Ted Stein
Editorial Page: Eric Schoch
Photo Technician: Denny Gainer

plied by Daily reporters Dan Biddle,
David Burhenn, Dan Blugerman,
Lorin Labardee, Marilyn Riley, Mar-
tin stern, Rebecca Warner, Sara
Fitzgerald and John Papanek.

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"Digging into the gas shortage"

Let's face it. There IS a gas shortage.
As a customer, it's not up to you to worry whether the gas is
--; n + hn+hn n -nn .% ...nnn : i -r n+'c - ro:nnci i

But new supplies from the Gulf Coast probably won't be
available in Michigan for several years. Meanwhile, we
must deoend on additional gas from Michigan wells, and

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