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January 17, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-17

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, January 17; 1974

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, January 17, 1974

JANUARY
SALE
0% to 50% 01
on
MANY
SHOES and
BOOTS

WILLIAM

I

Grid
By The Associated Press
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association, in a step it believes
will make college football safer,
yesterday outlawed downfield
blocking below the waist on
kickoff and punt returns next sea-
son.
Be careful with fire:
There are babes
in the woods.

rules r
"We have found that 5 per
cent of the injuries received on
kicking plays are knee injuries
and caused during downfield
blocking," noted "Pappy" Wal-
dorf, ch-irm!'n of the NCAA
rules committee.
The rule was among 94 wide-
ranging changes approved by the
committee during three days of
meetings here. Waldorf said some
of the rules were aimed at bring-
ing college football closer in line
with high school regulations.
One key change provides that
all infractions carry penalties,
something designed to lessen what
the committee described as "cheap
shots" during a game.
Also taking effect next season is
a rule calling for penalties on
running plays to be enforced from
where the ball stops. The lone ex-
ception, the committee said, is on
infractions committed by the of-
fensive team behind the ball. Those
will be stepped off from the point
of infraction.
Other major changes are:
-Athletes must remain in the
game for at least one play, while
anyone taken out of the game

evised
must remain out for one play.
the rule used last season allowed
a player to run into the game
with a play, then come out again.
-A player no longer will be re-
quired to extend his arm over his
head to signal a fair catch, but
will only have to raise the hand
above the head. Waldorf said the
change would help the receiver
handle the ball easier.

NCAA OPTS FOR SAFETY

Another change provides
only the player signaling the
catch can receive protection.

that
fair
"In

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9 Adwriisiog contributed for the public good.

other words, if one player signals
for a fair catch and then lets his
teammate catch it, the teammate
can be tackled," said Waldorf.
-Players receiving kickoffs can
shade their eyes against the sun.
This was not allowed previously.
-All footballs used next season
will be tan, with white stripes-
similar to a new high school rule.
Waldorf said balls can have white
stripes on 2, 3, or 4 panels. Start-
ing in 1975 balls must have stripes
on only two panels.
-A ball must pass between the
two uprights for a field goal. Pre-
viously a ball could pass over one
upright.
-All shoulder pads must have
rounded edges.
-If NCAA championship games
in Division II and III the smaller
colleges are tied at the end of
regular play, tie-breaking will be
allowed. Waldorf said the rule
would not apply to bowl games and,
did not say how the tie would be
broken.
Generally, the remaining rule
changes were minor ones which
NCAA officials said would help fill
loopholes in current regulations.

AP Photo
Where are they now?
Doug Ashworth, freshman flash of the 1971-72 Wolverine basketball season grabs a rebound for Ten-
nessee. Former teammate of Campy Russell and co-sponsor of an undefeated freshman season, Ash-
worth surprised Michigan fans by leaving school the following year. Here he grabs the rebound from
the Kentucky Volunteers in Southeastern Conferen ce action.

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MOTTA SUSPENDED

Bulls run by foot medic

By The Associated Press
Things are much quieter in the
Chicago Bulls camp now.
Their fiery coach Dick Motta
- not known for a quiet demean-
or on the- basketball court -
stayed in Seattle following the
National Basketball Association
All-Star game and the practice
chores fell to trainer Robert

Biel. Biel, who's never coached
before and played college ball
only briefly, was appointed act-
ing coach while Motta serves
out the one-week, suspension he
received for conduct detrimental
to the NBA.
NBA Commissioner Walter
Kennedy announced Motta's sus-
pension Tuesday along with a
$2,000 fine as a result of an al-
tercation with an official Jan. 4
following Chicago's 103-101 loss
at Seattle.

$1000 PRIZE FOR ESSAYS ON GRADUATE LIFE
The William James Center of The Wright Institute in Berkeley
is sponsoring a contest for graduate and professional school stu-
dents. Emphasis is on autobiographical essays that focus on a
specific aspect of graduate education, whether it be teaching as
a graduate student, writing a dissertation, or any other topic of
interest.
First prize is $1000, and there are five second prizes of $250
each. Winning essavs will be published as part of a book tenta-
tively entitled The Graduate Experience.
To enter the. contest formally, please send vour name, department
or school, college address, home address, and the proposed topic
of-your essay.
The William James Center
The Wriht Institute
2728 Durant Avenue
Berkeley, Calif. 94704
Length-5-20 pages, typewritten, double spaced.
Deadline for formal entry into the contest-Jan. 31, 1974.
Final deadline for submission of essays-March 31, 1974.

How does a foot
about taking over

doctor feel
a pro bas-

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ketball team with a good shot at
the playoffs?
"It's a great compliment,"
said Biel as he taped center
Cliff Ray's knee before the work-
out, "but I wish Phil Johnson
was here."
Johnson is the former Bulls'
assistant coach who recently
moved over to the top coaching
spot at Kansas City-Omaha.
"It's going to be very interest-
ing," said Biel. "Some of the
guys have jokingly asked me for
a raise. I told them if we go 3-0,
I'd ask for a raise."
The first foe Biel and his Bulls
will face will be the Pistons Fri-
day night at Detroit.
The Pistons, on a streak be-
fore the All-Star break, trail the
second-place Bulls in the Midwest
Division of the Western Confer-
ence by only two games.
After that, it's home games
against Portland Sunday and
Tuesday against Atlanta before
Motta's suspension runs out next
Wednesday.
"I'll be happy if we can win
two of three," said Biel. "After
that, I've got a job waiting as
trainer, again.
As it was, practice at the De
Paul University gym was nearly
an hour late starting because
Biel had to tape the players.

REPEAT PERFORMANCE!

Save Now!

Save Big!

HUGE
RECD

L

LA

r,?
t
c r

O AY

It's a spewing smoke-
stack. It's litter in the
streets. It's a river where
fish can't live.
You know what pollu-
tion is.
But not everyone does.
So the next time you see
pollution, don't close your
eyes to it.
Write a letter. Make a
call. Point itoutto someone
who can do something
about it.
People
start pollution.

at

IO U~'l

a

=

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