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April 19, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-19

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April i1, 1974

NOW IN ETOUCHSTONE PAPERBACK
THE
SEDUCTION
OF THE SPIRIT
THE USE AND MISUSE OF PEOPLE'S RELIGION
An autobiographical odyssey from the
best-known, most iconoclastic and best-sell-
ing writer on religion .in America today
"Brilliant."-The New York Times "The
best book to read to discover the new the-
ology In the making."-Chicago Sun-Times
HARVEYCOX
author of The Secular City
$2.95 * A Touchstone Book published by
SIMON AND SCHUSTER

VP role: Challenge for Rhodes

(Continued from Page 1)
to confront," he continues.
The GRC proposal recommends
such measures as dropping all re-
strictions on pass/fail grading, im-
plementing sweeping changes in
distribution requirements and abol-
ishing SAT scores and high school
gradepoints as admissions criteria.
ALTHOUGH Rhodes was pleas-
ed with students and faculty coop-
eration on the GRC, LSA govern-
ment president and GRC member
Jonathan Klein maintains that

Rhodes did not take student input
seriously.
"Rhodes is not really as flashy
and as liberal as he appears - the
GRC's final report shows that he
didn't consider student opinion very:
carefully," he says. "I really be-
lieve he sold some people down the
river."
Rhodes, who claims to hold stu-
dent opinion in high esteem, is
"distressed" by the reactions of
the student GRC members.
CITING HIS weekly open office
hour on Tuesday afternoon, the
Dean refers to the large number of
students he has become acquainted
with as a counselor.
"I try to be accessible to stu-
dents because people are what it's
all about," Rhodes explained.
As dean of LSA, Rhodes was in-
strumental in implementing the
Women's Studies and Inteflex pro-
grams. He also helped establish
faculty workshops, the college me-
dia center, "innovative teaching
awards" and the "checkpoint"
counseling system.

"I BELIEVE MORE has been
accomplished in the last three
years in LSA than in the previous
seven," said Rhodes.
"There has been more emphasis
on student and faculty evaluations
in the last three years and coun-
seling services have undergone
huge itiprovements," he contin-
ued.
"LSA offices were in a state of
virtual squalor before - the situ-
ation is improving, we have even
instituted air conditioning in the
student counseling office."
HOWEVER, DESPITE Rhodes'
heavy emphasis on innovation, he
opposes such measures as reveal-
ing faculty salaries and establish-
ing student parity on the LSA gov-
erning faculty.
"I'm more sympathetic than
most of the faculty, but at this
point, I don't see the reason for a
student vote on administrative is-
sues," said Rhodes.
"Changing anything is a huge
undertaking. At a time when the
University has ceased expanding

CRISLER SHOW:
Persuasions, Gladys
Knight do their thing

per
ATTENTION

Graduation
Announcements
for
RADUATING
SENIORS
ARE NOW ON SALE
Information Desk, Main Lobby LS.A. Bldg.4
N 4ia ' iw aL: y: tr1 t~lw' a(i 2

Bias charged by group
(Continued from Page 1i "Lack of communication, lack of
class people who can afford to understanding seem to be the ma-
come here," reads the protesters' jor problems," said CSSG memoer
statement released yesterday. Kathy Kolar. "A lot of people do.t
The remainder of the meeting even know how their government
was relatively quiet in comparisin. works."

JOHNSONS' Commission for thej
Study of S t u d e n t Governance
(CSSG) presented a mixed view of
campus apathy and concern abaut
SGC in their preliminary findings.
Their report focuses on a CSSG
survey of 1306 students.

HOWEVER, the report states
that 80 per cent of those surveyed
believe that a student government
does have a potential impact on
University decision making.
Today the board will vote on Re-
gent Gerald Dunn's (D-Lansing)
proposal seeking mandatory dis-
closure of f a c u lt y and staff
salaries.
But University officials maintain
that the resolution will probably'
die b ythe same 6-2 vote which
defeated it in 1973.

in numbers and budget-wise, every
new development means that some-
thing else had to be discontinued.
We're in the seventies - not the
golden sixties."
BANG hit,
on 'Throat'
'showing
(Continued from Page 1)
breach the agreement." Daane re-
fused to discuss any retaliatory
steps the University might have in
such a case, stating that was
"down the road a bit."
Bullard was not available for
comment.
According to BANG m e m b e r
Ralph Nash, the group did not in-
tend to act as a front for Bullard's
campaign. "We're not running this
for profit," Nash said. "All pro-
ceeds go into the BANG fund
which has been set up in the Uni-
versity."
ALTHOUGH NASH claims that
no BANG funds are earmarked for
Bullard's campaign, he stated, "I
imagine Bullard will receive some
benefit from it. We'll buy an ad
or two for him."
Although the name of the organi-
zation suggests a close tie between
Bullard and the group, Mah in-
sisted, "We're trying very hard to
keep some kind of line between
,ourselves and Perry Bullard."
He added, "Our name doesn't
define our activity," although he
admitted, "we're behind Perry Bul-
lard."
Nash claimed that BANG could
have just as easily been called
"the Robert F. Kennedy Action
Now Group."
THE DEEP THROAT print that
BANG will be using is not a regu-
lar commercial color version, but
rather a "personal, private copy"
in black-and-white, Nash said.
A recognized authority on the
film, Jim Johnson, vice president
of California's Pussycat Theater
chain, said last night that he had
"never even heard of a black-and-
white print of Deep Throat." John-
son indicated that he wouldn't want
to see the film without color.
There was some concern that
BANG's print might have been a
bootleg copy - thus explaining the
black-and-white nature--but Nash
assured The Daily "the copy of the
film we have tomorrow is legiti-
mate."
BANG officials refused to dis-
close where they had obtained their
private print. Member Bob Roth-
schild, who also serves as a staff
aide to Bullard, stated, "I can't
tell yu-it's confidential. I don't
think it needs to be public knowl-
edge."
WANTED-
400 well-wishers to invest more
or less $50.00 cash to make
DAVID'S BOOKS the best,
cheapest (25% off), and one of
the biggest A. A. bookstores.
EXCELLENT TERMS
209 S. State, 663-8441

By CHUCK BLOOM
"What the hell is a capella?
When we came over on the bot,
de didn't have no band."
With that in mind, leader-singer
Jerry Lawson and the Persuasions
smoothly proceeded to demonstrate
the fine art of a capela singing
before a full house at Crisler
Arena last night.
The Persuasions' marvelous mix-
ture of soul, gospel, and fifties
rhythm-end-blues, combined with
that New York City street corner
sound, all but stole the stage from
the night's featured act, Gladys
Knight and her impressive Pips.
AFTER A 35-minute delay and
a warmup set from the Soulful
Soulmates the five-man no-instru-
ments band did their think for al-
most an hour before a foot-stomp-
ing, hand-clapping crowd.
In nine songs, the Persusions
cooked with ingredients of gospel
("Give Praise Today," "Don't It
Make You Wanna Go Home"),
Group
plans
marches~
(Continued from Page)
gress to take action. It is impor-
tant to show Congress that a large
number of people are getting to-
gether."
The trips' expenses will be par-
tially covered by Tuesday's bene-
fit Phil Ochs concert and Mon-
day's showing of the W.C. Fields
movie My Little Chickadee. Rub in
hopes the committee will be able to
determine by Wednesday the cost
for each participant.
Glick cites "the illegal bombing
of Cambodia, impoundment of over
$40 billion, authorizing of secret
police outside the White House,
violation of the Bill of Rights by
illegal wiretaps and burglarizing"
as the major violations that call
for Nixon's impeachment.
GLICK ASSERTS, "The most
important thing is to put pressure
on the Congress to get moving."
He adds, "I don't think Nixon will
be removed from office until there
is a lot of pressure."
Rubin contends, "It is necessary
to set a precedent, to set a limit to
the powers of the President."
The march is supported by the
Women's International League for
Peace and Freedom, the National
Lawyer's Guild and 35 additional
local impeachment groups across
the country.
PROMINENT individuals active
in the event include Rep. Ron
] Dellums (D-Calif.), Rep. Bella Ab-
zug (D-N.Y.), Dr. Benjamin Spock,
Jane Fonda, former Attorney Gen-
eral Ramsey Clark, and Rev.
David Hunter, chairman of Na-
tional Council of Churches.
Rubin hopes a sizeable number
of students will come to the Fish-
bowl to sign up for the Washing-
ton an Chicago trips. The buses
are scheduled to leave the city fur
Washington at 8 p.m. Friday. Those
bound for Chicago will depart at
,6 a.m. Saturday.

soul ("Only Son"), and fifties
rhythm - and - blues ("Gypsy Wo-
man," "Come Go With Me,"
"Daddy's H o m e," "Goodnight
Sweetheart G o o d n i g h t," and
others).
THE KINGS of a capella filed
off the stage amid thunderous ap-
plause, making way for Gladys
Knight and the Pips, complete with
their Las Vegas-smooth orchestra-
tion, perfect choreography, and
slick style.
Knight and the Pips she has
performed with her brother and
two cousins for 21 years - wooed
and wowed the crowd with an end-
less, tightly-cued string of their
Motown-Buddha hits.
Knight was in excellent form-
her rich, robust voice filled the
far corners of Crisler Arena as the
Pips, never missing a step endless-
ly danced and bounced across the
stage.
Nixon tapes
subpoenaed
(Continued from Page 1)
the committee as a refusal on the
part of the White House to com-
ply."
HE AGREED THE White House
should be able to screen national
security information, but said lead-
ers of the House inquiry should
have an opportunity to review and
determine what could be screened
out. Otherwise, Rodino said, the
White House would make the deter-
mination of what evidence the im-
peachment inquiry gets.
Judge Sirica held no hearings on
Jaworski's request of Tuesday, but
he had the concurrence of two of
the defendants - Colson and Rob-
ert Mardian - that the subpoena
for the 64 tapes be issued.
"Information now available to
the government indicates that each
,of these materials contains or is
likely to contain evidence that will
be relevant and material to the
trial ofthis case," Jaworski said
in his motion.
IN THEIR MOTIONS joining the -
prosecutor in his request, lawyers
for Colson and Mardian asked they
be permitted to inspect all the ma-
terials.
Mitchell, Haldeman, Ehrlichman,
Colsontand Mardian - along with
Kenneth Parkinson and Gordon
Strachan - all are charged with
conspiring to obstruct justice.
All except Mardian, who was a
re-election committee aide, also
are charged with obstruction of
justice. The indictments also al-
lege 'Haldeman, Ehrlichman, M'it-
chell -and Strachan lied under oath.
TE MiTIGAN AIY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 169
Friday, Aprl 19, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at~
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area)' $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Obio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).
MONTESSORI
TEACHER June 24-
TRAINING August 7
in CHICAGO on beautiful campus
Prepare for expandin
opportunities.,
Larest Montes. Train staff
in U.S.
Write: MONTESSORI
1010 W. Chicago Ave.,
Chicago, III. 60622_

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Recycling Sale
The remaining FRESHMEN REGISTERS
from 1968-1974 are on sale for .50-$1.00
BUY A COPY and remember those
GOOD OLD DAYS
come to UAC office, 2nd floor,
Michigan Union, Mon,-Fri. 10-5

U

Streak _
Van Heu'l sen! ___
For revealing your true colors
in a most original way,
streaking can hardly be
overlooked! But for keeping
up appearances in the most
high.spirited styling, daring
designs and eye-opening
hues, you'll also need the
dashing fashion from
Van Heusen - adventurous
new shirts that always get
noticed!
O7by
VAN HEUSEN*

For a trial size package of Koex"
tampons (5 tampons), a pretty purse
container, and a very explanatory
book entitled "Tell It Like It Is",
mail this order form with 254 in coin
to cover mailing and handling to:
Kotex tampons
Box 551 CN1
Neenah, Wisconsin 54956
Narne
Addres
state Zip
Allow 4 weeks for delivery.
Offer expires December 31, 1973.
Limt one per customer.
KOTr~PO"._

CENTICORE BOOKSHOP has Records again! 0
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encore Classical encore Turnabout-ABC I enCOre
RECORD Blues-Rock RECORD RCA-CommandSo RECORD
SSALE Jazz-folk I SALE Decca-Vox [ SALE
OUT OF PRINT RECORDS-NOT AVAILABLE A RECORD SHOPS (
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BOXED SET VALUES Billie Holiday-Bream-Gershwia,
GUSTAV MAHLER Deller Consort-Caruso-T Rex
Symphony No. 8 & Symphony No. 2, Con- Melanie-Guthrie-Collegium Aureum .
ductors Mitropoulos & Klemperer. 3 record
set, 50 au Leadbelly--Cage--James Gang
50% to 70% OFF TCH15.0vaI-OV5.98t LI:-E
TCH AIKOSKY Einton-Richter-Seinber
3 record set, 14.98 value 98 Callas-Minaus-Elena Polonska
Single Albums: .99-2.495MOZART Nielsen-Hendrix-Grieq
Complete Wind Concerti Greaorian Chants -P P o M
i2 Boxed Sets (2 to 9 records) 6.98 Mendelsshn-Indian Music
I " CLASSICAL GUITAR Conned Heat-Sarah Vauqhn
43 to .98 per record. S Iimida,,Montovothers. 5 record Conned eSaa h
se,1.0value Mimi & Richard Forina--Bacht
7,98 Sonny Terry-Buffo St. Marie
HURRY BEETHOVEN Prokofiev-Lightnin Hopkins
The Nine Complete Symphonies. William
_. ..r ,Steinberg & the Pittsburgh Symphony. 44.50 Unmunu i CAI GnIITC miQ

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