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January 17, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-17

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Thursday, January 17, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thurday Janary17, 974THE ICHGAN AIL

Kissinger makes
fast peace trips

Page Three
Tanaka's Jakarta visit marred
by widespread demonstrations

JERUSALEM (Reuter) - Sec-
retary of State Henry Kissinger
arrived here last night on his third+
visit in a week and reported good
progress towards an agreement on
separating Israeli and Egyptian
forces around the Suez Canal. +
Soon after his arrival in Jeru-I
salem, Israeli Foreign Minister
Abba Eban - who had accompan-
ied Kissinger on the 45-minute1
drive from Ben-Gurion Airport near
Tel Aviv - told reporters he had
been informed of definite progress.
"Well, I think progress is defin-
itely being made according to the
Secretary of State," Eban said.
Eban said the first session of
talks would begin at 7:30 a.m. la-I
cal time to allow Kissinger to sleep
after his hectic traveling back and
forth between Jerusalem and As-,
wan since last Friday.
He will also have a separate
meeting with Prime Minister Golda
Meir then, have a working lunch at
Eban's residence with various min-
isters, expected to include Defense
Minister Moshe Dayan and Deputy
Prime Minister Yigal Allon.
"There are some matters still to
be discussed - some substantive
matters," Eban said.
Kissinger was expected to be in
Jerusalem all day, he added.
Asked whether any arrangements
had been made for a joint Egyp-
tian-Israeli announcement, Eban
replied: "We have not got around
to telling you about it yet."
Earlier ysterday before taking!
off for Aswan - Kissinger told
reporters his negotiations w e r e
making good progress and that he
hoped the remaining differences
would be narrowed and perhaps en-
tirely eliminated.
He had spent about 37 hours in
Israel this time around, holding
a series of talks with Deputy Pre-
mier Yigal Allon, Foreign Minister
Abba Eban and Defense Minister

Moshe Dayan, as well as having ar
long private session with Premier
Golda Meir.
He took with him to Egypt a new
formula prepared after a late-night
meeting of Israeli and American
officials, which was also attended
by Eban and Dayan.
However, last minute touches
were necessary, even after another
two-hour session yesterday morn-
ing in Jerusalem, and Kissinger's
flight was delayed for half an
hour while he had more discus-
sions with Eban and Dayan.
Kissinger resumed his talks with
President Anwar Sadat immed-
iately after ariving from Tel Aviv
with Israel's reaction to Egyptian
proposals for disengagement of;
their troops in the Suez C a n a 1
and Sinai areas.
Kissinger came with "the hope
Sof narrowing the gap still fur-
ther and perhaps to eliminate
it."
At their meeting last night --
Kissinger's second with Sadat
yesterday - the two men poured
over maps in a search for a com-
promise with Israel ondisengag-
ing the forces that were at war
in October.
Their session was delayed for
more than an hour while Kissing-
er had an unscheduled session
with Egyptian Foreign Minister
Ismail Fahmy.
Kissinger then returned to Jeru-
salem late last night for yet ano-
ther conference with Israeli lead-
ers on. proposals for separating
forces in the Suez Canal region.
Kissinger, who had been away
from Israel for less than 12
hours to have talks in Egypt with
President Anwar Sadat, made no
statement but smiled at report-
ers who awaited him in pouring
rain at Ben-Gurion International
Airport.

AP Photo
An Indonesian soldier clubs a youth who resisted arrest during anti-Japanese rioting yesterday. The
youth was beaten unconscious. The soldiers, backed by armored vehicles, dispersed rampaging
crowds protesting the state visit of Japanese Prime Minister Kakuei Tanaka. The anti-Japanese sen-
timent stems from Japanese economic domination of Indonesia.
ECONOMIC GLOOM GROWING:
Pound Sterlinghits new lo

JAKARTA (Reuter) - Violent
demonstrations broke out for the
second straight day yesterday as
Japanese Prime Minister Kakuei
Tanaka continued his protest-
marred official visit to Jakarta
behind a ring of troops and arm-
ored cars.
At least seven students were
reported killed in student demon-
strations Tuesday against alleged
Japaneseeconomic exploitation
of Indonesia.
Widespread riots led to the
clamping of an all night curfew
on the city, the closure of schools
and universities and a ban on
assemblies of more than five
people.
Scores of people are believed
to have been hurt in demonstra-
tions and riots Tuesday.
Observers said there were few-
er students among crowds invol-
ved in the most serious incidents
yesterday which took place near
Jakarta's main business area.
Up to 10,000 people massed
across a six lane road while hun-
dreds of youths broke into lines
of massage parlors and bars,
threw out furniture and set them
ablaze.
Troops opened fire several
times yesterday as a warning to
crowds to disperse. One eyewit-
ness said commandoes fired
warning bursts about 10 min-
utes to break up the riot where
youths were ransacking the mas-
sage parlors.
Guests at the Kartika Plaza
Hotel opposite the parlors s a i d
about 10 yeople, including young
children, were brought into the
lobby seriously injured - appar-
ently after being trampled by
the crowds.
Yesterday's disturbances ap-
peared to have degenerated
from solely anti-Japanese pro-
tests into what one diplomat de-
scribed as "more civil disorder."
Some groups shouted that they
wanted the government to lower
prices and do more to help the
poor.

As the biggest protest of the
day got under way yesterday af-
ternoon, Tanaka told a press con-
ference he was not upset by the
demonstrations.
Since he arived in Jakarta
on Monday night, the Japanese
leader has not moved out of the
grounds of the presidential pal-
ace area where the state guest
house and presidential office are
also located.
Three planned excursions from
the guest house have been can-
celled because of the security sit-

Mation.
Army sources said yesterday
Gen. Sumitro, head of the overall
body responsiblp for security,
Kopkamtib, ordered army com-
manders to start cracking down
on law breakers and make whole-
sale arrests if necessary.
The Jakarta garrison command
said today a total of 500 build-
ings, nearly all of them Japan-
ese, have been destroyed in the
rioting. So far more than 171
people have been arrested, the
command added.

LONDON (Reuter) - T h e
pound sterling dropped to new
lows yesterday under pressure
of growing economic gloom and
uncertainty about a British gen-
eral election.
Heavy selling sent the pound
down to just below 2.17 against
the U.S. dollar at one point, an
effective devaluation of around
15 per cent since last summer.
For the first time in some weeks
the pound also slipped back
against European currencies as
well.

MUCH
believed

OF THE SELLING was
due to Tuesday's fore-

- -

UP TO $30,000:
State pays for tips on drug pushers

LANSING (UPI) - State Police
Director John Plants yesterday
announced the start of a confi-
dential telephone tip program
paying up to $30,000 for informa-
tion leading to the conviction of
large-scale drug pushers.
The program, dubbed TIP
(Turn In Pushers), is one of the
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 39
Thursday, January 1, 1974
is edited, and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus,
area) ; $6.50 local mail (Michigan andl
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail 'other
states and foreign).
crmo

first in the country to be oper-
ated on a state-wide basis. Plants
said the first calls on the 24-
hour toll-free number, 800-292-
2277, were accepted yesterday.
PLANTS CALLED the pro-
gram a form of "bounty hunting"
to seize large caches of drugs
and jail big-time pushers and
manufacturers.
"We're not zeroing in on mar-
ijuana sellers, although large-
scale pot salesmen are usually in-
volved in hard drugs too," Plants
said.
"We already know who t h e y
are - what we need now is ad-
missable evidence."
PLANTS SAID payment to con-
fidential tipsters will be m a d e
after a big bust or conviction of
dealers.
"It could conceivably be four
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or five months 'til an informant
is paid off," he said. "But we
assume that with this much
money riding on information,
they will periodically call back
to ask what's shakin' on the
case."
Callers will be given a random
number to preserve their anony-
mity and yet give positive identi-
fication. Calls will be taped but
not traced.,
"SOMEBODY JUST can't call
in and give us the name of a
dealer," Plants said. "We need
specific and admissable evi-.
dence."
A board of unidentified persons
will judge how much an inform-I
ant will be paid based on the
quality of information.
Plants refused to identify the'
members of the board, other than
calling them "a panel of prom-
inent citizens."
FUNDS FOR the administra-
tion of the program as well as
for the cash awards were grant-
ed by legislative appropriation
last year.
The TIP program is part of a
state-wide crackdown on illicit
drug traffic. Gov. William C.
Milliken last week said he will
ask for funding of a $3.5 million
anti-drug campaign, including
dogs trained to sniff out drugs
at customs points.

cast by Bank of England Gov-
ernor Gordon Richardson t h a t
Britain might face a decade of
austerity because of a con'in-
uing international trade deficit.
Stock markets also suffered irn
the general wave of gloom.
Still no sign emerged of a
settlement in the coal mine wage
dispute which has driven the na-
tion's industry on to the three-
day work week for shortage of
fuel.
Prime Minister Edward Heath
remained non-committal on whe-
ther or not he intends to call a
snap general election on the is-
sue of union militants defying the
anti-inflation regulations laid
down by parliament.
LEADERS OF THE Trades Un-
ion Congress (T.U.C.), the cen-
tral body representing organized
labor, met among themselves
yesterday to discuss their coal
peace plan. But hopes of obtain
ing government approval were
low.
The T.U.C. has proposed a
plan allowing the miners a pay
increase higher than the levels
prescribed by present govern-
ment rules. In return, other un-
ions would refrain from using
the miners' example to push their
own claim.
The government insisted that
the T.U.C. offer was. not firm
enough to ensure suppression of
inflationary demands by the oth-
er unions.
THE MINERS, whose over-
time ban has seriously reduced
fuel stocks at electric p o w e r
stations, are refusing to ea ter
fresh peace negotiations unless
more money is offered.
The crisis brought more threats
of discomfort during the day.
Health officials warned t h a
some hospitals mighthave io
close for lack of medical sup-
plies as a result of the three-
day work week by manufactur.
ers.
One big relief was a retur'n to
normal today by the railways
where train drivers have been
staging strikes and go-slows fcr
the past five weeks. The driver's
union called a truce to permit

wage talks on Jan. 22.
BRITONS WERE reminded of
the underlying oil crisis, which
has largely dropped from atten-
tion during the coal shortage, by
a request from major petroleum
companies to raise their prices
by 13 cents above the presen
average dollar a gallon.
Prime Minister Heath yes'er-
day also warned of a taeat
of panic action by some govern-
ments in the oil and energy cris-
is which he said "could bring
about a slump in world trade "
The prime minister, however,
defended Britain's moves to ne-
gotiate guaranteed oil supplies
from producer nations.

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Marionette Theatre of Peter Arnott
Aeschylus' ORESTEIA (parts two and three)
THE LIBERATION BEARERS and EUMENIDES
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE AUDITORIUM-8 P.M.
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$1.50 GENERAL ADMISSION
Tickets available PTP Ticket Office 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 2 p.m.-5
p.m. and at door.
Further information call 764-0450
NOON LUNCHEON
SOUP AND SANDWICH-40c
Friday, January 18
JIM TOY and JACKIE BAILEY
Human Sexuality Advocates
Office of Student Special Services
"EXPLORATIONS OF LOVE RELATIONSHIPS:
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FRIDAY EVENING-6 p.m.
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SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m., Rm. 1057 MHRI

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