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April 16, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Army
LAGOS, Nigeria (A) - Theg
ernment of draught-stricken I
er, previously regarded as<
of black Africa's stablest if p
est nations, was toppled yes
day in an army coup, Radio T
mey reported.
The overthrow of Presi
Hamani Diori's 15 - year -
government was led by Lt.C
Seyni Kountie, chief of staff
Niger's 2,500-man army, acco
ing to the broadcasts from l
mey, Niger's capital city.
IN A RADIO address, Kou
said the army acted to reli
"the catastrophic situation in
country."

coup topples
gov- "The army had to take its re- during the takeon
Nig- sponsibilities. We could not re- dio announcemen
one main with our arms folded" in a dication of Dior
oor- situation where the citizens of or condition.
ter- Niger were no longer assured a Kountie announ
Nia- meal every day, he said. tution was suspe
"After 15 years of reign mark- tional Assembly d
dent ed by injustice, corruption, sel- political organiz
old fishness and indifference with re- sed. He said a
Col. gard to the people whose happi- cil composed of
f of ness it pretended to assure, the be created soon 1
ord- army can no longer tolerate the ernment.
Nia- permanence of the oligarchy," Kountie saida
Kountie said. agreements take
ntie THE RADIO reported all was vious governmen
ieve calm in Niamey and said the spected "on con(
the army was in "full control." take into accoun
There was no report of violence and dignity of o

Niger government

I

ver, but the ra-
nts gave no in-
i's whereabouts
nced the consti-
ended, the Na-
dissolved and all
ations suppres-
supreme coun-
officers would
to head the gov-
all international
n by the pre-
.t would be re-
dition that they
nt the interests
ur people."

I

Ag'new sees self as novelist
suffering political persecution

HE CALLED on civil ser-
vants and members of the gov-
ernment to return to their jobs
on Tuesday.
"We have faith in the popu-
lace," Kountie said. "It must
remain calm in order that noth-
ing regrettable happens."
An indefinite curfew was im-
posed from 7:30 p.m. to 6 a.m.
which Kounties said must be ob-
served "to the letter." He said
the curfew would be eased as the
situation becomes normal. But,
he added, "we do not want to un-
dertake anything in a hurry."
RADIO NIAMEY played mar-
tial music throughout the day,
interrupted repeatedly by Koun-
tie's tape - recorded message to
the nation. Little is known of the
43-year-old coup leader, a French
trained soldier who became chief
of staff in 1973.
The coup brings to 15 the to-
tal number of black African
countries south of the Sahara
under military rule.
There have been over 30 mili-
tary takeovers or abrupt changes
of government in the 14 years
since Britain, France and Bel-
gium relinquished control of their
black African colonies.
Over half of black Africa,
about 130 million people, cur-
rently lives under military or
quasimilitary rule in Mali, Upper
Volta, Ghana, Togo, Dahomey,
Nigeria, Central African Repub-
lic, the Congo, Zaire, Uganda, So-
malia, Rwanda, Burundi, and Su-
dan.
WITH THE overthrow of Diori,

only nine West and Central Af-
rican countries - Gabon, Cam-
eroon, Ivory Coast, Liberia, Sier-
ra Leone, Guinea, Gambia, Sene-
gal and Mauritania - retain ci-
vilian regimes.
With the exception of Gambia,
however, all the civilian-ruled
nations are run by leaders
through a single political party
and tolerate no legal opposition.
Diori, 57, a former school
teacher, became president of Ni-
ger in 1960 when France granted
the sub-Saharan nation of 4.2
million people independence.
IN THE EARLY years of his
rule, Diori was plagued by the
opposition of the Communist-
backed Sawaba party led by his
longtime political foe Djibo Bak-
ery.
An abortive army coup took
place in 1963, but Diori survived
and five men were later con-
demnedto death.
Sawaba rebels, backed by the
late President Kwame Nkrumah
of Ghana, attacked Niger border
posts in 1964 and Diori ordered
seven of the captured terrorists
be shot in public in Niamey,
while 23 others were also sen-
tenced to death.
DIORI ESCAPED an estimated
assassination the following year
when a bomb exploded while he
was at the Tabasqui Mosque in
Niamey.,
Diori's last months in power
were devoted to seeking interna-
tional financial support for a
"Marshall Plan" in West Africa,

Boole,

The University of Michigan Theatre Prograrm
RICHARD D. MEYER, DMctotJ, ROLAND WILSON,(i te C T RMaNa45(4
T F ERE M E PFAD

NEW YORK, (Reuter) - For-
mer vice president Spiro Agnew,
whose novel-in-progress is ex-
cerpted in the current edition of
the Ladies Home Journal, pic-
tured himself yesterday as a
novelist suffering political per-
secution.
Agnew, in an interview accom-
panying the excerpt, said:
"There will be people who, be-
cause of who I am, will refuse to
read my book, who will feel an-
tagonism toward those who have
published it."
"I don't think it is any more
fair for these people to complain
to the Journal about publishing
my novel than it is for anyone to
have surpressed the work of
(Soviet dissident author) Alexan-
der Solzhenitsyn."
AGNEW, WHO RESIGNED
from the vice-presidency last
year after pleading no contest to
charges of tax evasion, said he
thought of writing the novel
after his resignation.
When you have gone through
a very traumatic experience ...
your first thought is that you
must restore your confidence by
doing something creative, some-
thing that comes about not be-
cause of who you know or who
wants to help you, but a product
that stands on its own merit,"
Agnew said.
:"THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 157
Tuesday, April 16, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
throughSatiay morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.60 non-local mail 'othei
states and foreign).
We Style Hair...
We Don't Just Cut It
appointments available
Dascola Barbers
Arborland-971-9975
Maple Village-761-2733
East Liberty-668-9329
East University-662-0354

Agnew insisted he did not
have a ghost-writer.
The excerpt, of about 5,500,
words, begins the romance be-
tween the book's hero, aristo-
cratic, healthy U. S. Vice-Presi-
dent Porter Canfield, and Mere-
dith Lord, the beautiful Secre-
tary of Health, Education and
Welfare.
Elsewhere, the novel deals with
an Iranian plot to use the vice-
president to stir up Mid-east
strife to save Afghanistan from
the Soviet Union.
"ONE OF THE principle re-
straints I put on myself is that
my book should not do anything
the endanger national security or
disrupt important international
relations," Agnew said.
He said the characters did not
represent real 'political figures,
living or dead.
Agnew said he was frightened
of writing sex scenes and he
doesn't believe the book will
succeed "because I will make
it superheated in those aspects."
"I have to admit that I won't
always be writing from my own
experience; I'm not a man of
great experience in this area."
THE FORMER Vice-President
said he intends to write a serious

book on his experiences in the
office, and in fact that his friend
singer Frank Sinatra had warned
him against fiction since it
might be misunderstood and af-
fect the reputation of his serious
writing.
Yet, Agnew rejected non-fic-
tion because, "I am far too bit-
ter."
Agnew does not know whether
President Nixon will read his
work:
"I can't say. I have had no
contact with him since I re-
signed. Actually, I don't know
how much reading Mr. Nixon
does or what his personal habits
are."
PLAYBOY publications will
eventually publish the book, pay-
ing Agnew between $50,000 and
$250,000 according to a spokes-
man for Playboy.
The Ladies Home Journal de-
scribed the section in this issue
as a 'preview excerpt' and
plans eventually to condense the
entire work in its pages.
But it was unclear how much
of his novel Agnew has written
so far. He said in the interview
that much of the novel's action
takes place in Teheran, and
that he might visit there to give
the action more realism.

ARTHLR MILLER
YF STANLEY SILVERMAN
~D doby ROLAND 6A6N0N 1
wirtNa*uwby t
ARTHUR M ILLER
SETH ALLEN
BOB BhINGHAM
DENNIS COOLEY
KI MBE RLY FARR
LARRY MARSHALL
ALLAN NICHOLLS

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
f s:}::.ii"}} ::...... ..: - . .:.A q,;.^.:}...wrfy ?... :... . . ..Fy:":. ::y};
Tuesday, April 16 Painter of Fantasies," Aud. 3, MLB,
4:30 p.m.
Day Calendar Music School: String Chamber Music
Industrialrand Operations Engin. Student Recital, Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
EWm. Boag Jr., Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Music School: Stephen Bryant, bari-
"A Graphical Representation for Regis- tone, Recital Hal m wp.m.
ter Transfer Systems Analysis," 311 Music School: James Dawson, saxo-
West Engin., 10 a.m. phone Doctoral, Cady Music Rm.,
Music School: Wind and Percussion Stearns Bldg., 8 p.m.
Student Recital, Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m. Music School: Contemporary Direc-
MERIT: A. Moluf, Mich. State Univ., tions Ensemble. Univ. Philharmonia,
"PASCAL Language," Sem. Rm., Com- David Robbins, conductor, "New Mus-
puting Ctr., 3 p.m. ic for Instruments, Electronics, and
ACRICS: Crisler Arena, 3:15 p.m. Orchestra," Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Extension Service, English: poetry
reading, grad students, Aud. B, Angeil
Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Psych. Film Series: "Flatland;"
"why Man Creates;" "Maurits Escher:

ALAN ILLINGS

ZELMA WEI5FELD

R. CRAIG WOU

APRIL 23 -28 1974 EVES;8PM T 1
Power Center for the Performi no Arts

4-50

IMon

The Spontaneity of. Organized Movement
at y
APRIL 17-8:00 P.M.
AT THE
I C r.UNIONst floor Michigan Union
featuring dancers VETA GOLER, JAN APSECHE,
SALLY TURNER, MARY ANNE MOSES
Composed by GERHARD SCHLANSKY
A LIVING SCULTPURE EVENT
I r

AT
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
We can't offer you breathtaking sunsets, waterfalls, or Mediterranean
soothing evenings. If we were off the Cote d'Azure, then maybe ...
But if you are staying in Ann Arbor this summer, why not enjoy
the best we can offer-a luxurious, relaxing

SW'mm

G

POOL

OPEN FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE FROM 10:00 TO 10:00
Come and see us, before the heat wave hits the city.
e LOW RENTS
* CONVENIENT LOCATION
e UNSURPASSABLE ACCOMMODATIONS
and on top of that
* A SWIMMING POOL
It may not be the Red Sea, but you will love it just the same
THIS SUMMER-COOL IT DOWN

powerful, provocative, Stunning,
stimulating, startling, compelling,
bizarre and beautiful
The ALWIN NIKOLAIS DANCE THEATRE comes to Ann Arbor this weekend for two per-
formances in the Power Center. Alwin Nikolais' unique contribution to dance is the multi-media,
abstract theatre he has developed, building drama through sound, time, shape, color, light, and
motion. This modern dance presentation includes the following: Suite from 'Sanctum" (1964),
"Scenario" (1971), and "Foreplay" (1972).
Performances on Thursday and Friday night (same program), April 18 & 19, at 8:00
in the Power Center-tickets from $4-$8, available at Burton Tower or at the Power,
Center box office 1 2 hours before concert times. A lecture-demonstration will be
held tomorrow night, April 17, at the Power Center, at 8:00-$2.00 general admission
tickets available at the door.

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