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April 14, 1974 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 14, 1974

SudyAri 4,17

Japan's trains roll
after costly strike

Kissinger gets new
Syrian peace plan

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TOKYO W) - Japanese trains
began running again late yester-
day after the worst transport
strike in the nation's history.
Full service was not expected to
be restored until tomorrow.
The transport strike was one
of a string of nationwide strikes,
organized by Japan's powerful
labor unions in their annual spring
offensive. Communications, civil
service and sanitation employes
also took part in massive walkouts
of varying lengths that affected
half of Japan's 130 million resi-
dents.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 156
Sunday, April 14, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Puiblished
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session publishes Tuesday
through- Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;othe,
states and foreign).

EMPLOYES of the state-owned
Japan National Railways won wage
hikes averaging 28.2 per cent, or
$104 a month. They had sought
raises of between 30 and 35 per
cent to counter a 24 per cent rise
in the cost of living last year.
Other government employes end-
Ied their walkouts after accepting
an average monthly hike of 29.27
per cent. Private railway workers
got a 31 per cent increase of $102
a month.
Some workers were still dissat-
isfied, labor leaders said, because
the settlements did not guarantee
permission for public employes to
strike. A council of cabinet minis-
ters will study the question.
THE STRIKERS included postal
workers, taxi drivers, garbage men
and teachers as well as airline,
telephone and telegraph em-
ployes.
Some 120 million pieces of mail
piled up during the strike; 28,000
tons of garbage went uncollected
in Tokyo during the first day of
the sanitationmen's refusal to
work.

(Continued from Page 1)
told newsmen the two sides were
approaching the half-way point to-
ward an agreement. He said Che-
habi had authorized him to pass
along the plan to the Israeli side.
IN BETWEEN the two meetings,
Kissinger conferred with Egyptian
Foreign Minister Ismail Fahmy
and separately with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko.
"The United States will continue
its efforts to bring the two sides
together," the secretary told news-
men, "and it continues to consider
disengagement between Syrian
and Israeli forces the primary ob-
jective to be achieved in the Mid-
die East right now."
Kissinger, who saw Chehabi
three times, added: "I believe the
talks we had here this weelend
have furthered this effort."
The secretary also discussed the
prospects for disengagement with
4 Egyptian Foreign Minister Ismail
Famy and over lunch with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromy-
ko.
AS KISSINGER pursued his di-
plomacy, Israel sent warplanes
AP Photo against Syria for the second time
spectacled since the October war. According
pectcled to Tel Aviv, the planes hit an in-
a recep- vading Syrian force that had in-
U.S.S.R. filtrated the Golan Heights truce
gers is a line.
Adding to the somber backdrop,
the Syrian state-controlled televi-
sion charged Kissinger with pay-
ing attention only to "superficial
details" rather than the basic is-

sue of Israeli withdrawal from for-
mer Arab lands.
And Tass, the Soviet news agen-
cy, attributed tensions in the area
to "Israel's ruling circles and the
external forces backing it."
Rosenberg"i
son comes
to campus
(Continued from Page 1)
post-war politics.
"It is important to demonstrate
to people where my parents' trial
fits into American mythology,"
Meeropol argues. "We must attack
the notion that abuse of govern-
ment power is justified to protect
national security.
"AMERICANS M U S T realize
that our parents* trial, the Water-
gate crimes, and the secret bomb-
ing in Cambodia are all part of
the same chain."
Meeropol will also be speaking,
without the slide show, to a Resi-
dential College class in political
economy Tuesday afternoon at 4
p.m. in the East Quad Green
Lounge.

I

3035 Washtenaw across from lee Oldsmobile

a

NANCY MAGINNES KISSINGER (right) and her bes
husband Henry contemplate their surroundings during
tion with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko at the
embassy in Washington yesterday. In front of the Kissini
plate of lobster.

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