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April 13, 1974 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-13

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Saturday, Apri 1 13, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poge Five

Saturday, April 13, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Getils
By TOM KIPPERT
In the past few years a certain
closeness has developed between
the J. Geils Band and Detroit.
When the boys play that city,
two or three shows are almost
assured because of their stellar
popularity. In fact, last June
brought four consecutive nights
of the J. Geils Band to the De-
troit rock agenda.
Wednesday night's C r i s I e r
Arena concert indicated that the
J. Geils Band has spread their
magnetism a few miles West to
the mellowed confines of Ann
Arbor.
I n p r e s.s e d by the crowd,
lead vocalist Peter Wolf even
adapted a change to the ever-
popular 'Detroit Demolition' dur-
ing the son 'Hard Drivin Man.'
The howling chanteur issued a
new dance craze (a classic rock
idiom) - the 'Ann Arbor Inter-
lude.'
After seeing this group last
February in Detroit, I didn't de-
tect much of a change in the
material performed. The Geils
Band does their own brand of
accelerated, almost rowdy street-
rock and boogie. Surprisingly, I
think that the band performs

oogies cat Crisler

Crucible': Boring
with excellent acting

equally as well when they at-
tempt slower, bluesier-type jams
(take n o t e of the heartful
'Chimes' or 'Serves You Right
To Siffer'). The crowd at Crisler
came primarily to boogie down
and that's exactly what J. Geils,
Peter Wolf and Co. did.
Warmup band Nils Lofgren and
Grin adequately sparked the
crowd after getting off to a slow
take-off. Taking a few years to
solidfy, Grin is now more con-
sistent in concert. Their LPs are
good but underrated, and few.
people if anybody have heard of
their better efforts like 'Love or
Else.'
The headline entourage tooK
over after stage change with 'I
Did You No Wrong (So Why'd
You Hurt Me Baby)' and the
dance-evoking 'Southside Shuffle'
from the Geils Band LPs 'Ladies
Invited' and 'Bloodshot,' respec-
tively. At this point the audie :ce
was fiery and cheering at every
move that Wolf made, every
powerful guitar part that (veils
played and so on.
As individual musicians, J.
Geils (lead guitar), Daniel Klein
("a swell guy" on bass), Seth
Jus t m a n (keyboards), Magic
Dick (amplified mouth harp) and
Stephen Jo Bladd (drums) are
not extraordinary. The band's

main strength lies in the fact that
it is a' top-flight band. The word
in this case c a r r i e s a lot of
weight.
Geils, Justman and Magic Dick
share the major portion of spot-
lighted solos. Klein a n d Stephen
Jo Bladd provide one of the most
precise, yet powerful rhythm sec-
tions in "live" rock and roll to-
day.
As lead vocalist, Peter Wolf
fires the group itself up. He is not
the greatest talent-wise but as
the Graham Gouldman tune goes,
he's got "a heart full of soul." I
hate to say this, but this Wolf
has a lot of bite.
'Give It To Me,' the band's
truest hit thus far received a
unique treatment as the first en-
core. Seth Justman and Stephen
Jo Bladd went through a catchy
but at times pointless percussion
break. The crowd was enthralled
by it and the typically powered
ending that followed.
The way that the J. Geils
Band attracts r o c k followers in
this area (Ann Arbor-Detroit), it
is safe to say that they'll return
in another few months. If you
haven't caught this band yet, it
is also safe to say that you must.

By JIM KENTCH
The University P 1 a y e r s are
currently prod1ucing The Crucible,
by Arthur Miller, at Trueblood
Theatre. And although t h i s pro-
duction has excellent moments
and some very competent ele-
ments, nobody would want it to
be longer.
The Crucible is the dramatiza-
tion of the Salem witch trials, an
episode of our past we all read
about in our ninth grade history
books. But if history were this
boring we would never have to
worry about repeating it.
What makes this production
boring is its length (God bless
you, Mr. Miller), the difficulty
in understanding some speeches
because they are hoarsely shout-
ed and society's current jaded
feeling toward the d e v i min the
wake of The Excorist.
Some excellent acting saves the
play from playing to a sleeping
audience. Jack Van Natter as
the Deputy Governor controls the
courtroom scene, the play's best
scene, with his excellent por-
trayal of the God-fearing hang-
ing judge. Even Jeffries as the
good Reverend Hale and Geof-
frey Rieger as the wronged farm-
er Corey are also outstanding.

Doily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS

A scene from the 'U' Player's production of 'The Crucible'

ARTS

" h n arbor. film cooperative,
presents
the fourth annual
8MM FILM FESTIVAL
Tonight
SATURDAY, April 13
SUNDAY, April 14, WINNERS
2 DIFFERENT SHOWS NIGHTLY

East Quad.
Auditorium

7 and 9

75c one show
$1.25 both shows

J. Geils Band

I'

But perhaps' the best perfor-
mance w a s Maureen Sullivals
Abigail Williams. Her voice was
a welcome relief to the other
harsh voices, and her d6mnni
frenzies appeared v e r y real in.
deed. Most imposing of all the
characters, her presence mn stage
brooded over the performance.
The well - constructed sets pre-
sented a Puritan verisimilitude,
unobtrusive a n d satisfactory.
"If history were this
b o r i nt g, we would
never have to('worry
about repeating it."
But the lighting was unimagina-
tive and the entrances and exits
rather clumsy.
It's a worthwhile production
of a perhaps overworked play.
But although we already know
the story and have its "moral"
inscribed on our national collect
tive unconscious, Jack V a n Nat-
ter and Maureen Sullivan are
well worth the price of a ticket.
SMORGASBORD
SATURDAYS 6-9 p.m.
AND
WEDNESDAYS 6-9 p.m.
$3.95
1. cold vichysoisse
2. coq au vin
3. potatoes Anna
4. shrimp newburgb
5. bouf burguignone
6. rice
7. swedish meat balls
8. verniceet
9. breaded veal cutlet
i0. fresh garden green
11. tarragon peas
12. eggplant parmesan
13. beef oriental
14. veal hearts
15. chicken giblets
16. cheese easserole
17. sliced beef
18. fried chicken
19. barbecued ribs
20. fried cod fish
21. black oives
22. greek olives
23. green olives
24. dill pickles
25. Celery
26. carrots
27. green onions
28. crab apples
29. red peppers
30. radishes
31. corn salad
32. sliced cucumbers
with sour cream
33. sliced tomatoes
with fresh dill
34. red bean salad
35. greek bean Salad
36. Italian green peppers
37. greek stuffed eggplants
38. sliced beets
39. garlic sauce
40. herring
41. Portuguese sardines
42. anchovies
43. cod fish caviar mousse
44.. cod fish red caviar
45. liver pate
46. sliced jambon
47. sliced salami
48. sliced cold turkey
49. chicken salad
50. russian fish salad
$1. tuna fish salad
52. cottage cheese
53. sliced mushroom in
dill sauce
54. eggrois
55. hot mustard sauce
56. stuffed eggs bonnefemme
S7. Cole slaw
58. cold salmon
59. fresh tuna in soyu sauce

60",butter
61. home made bread
62. diced tongue
63. horse radish sauce
64. chicken wings Japanese
65. fried squid
66. smoked pork chAps
67. potato salad
68. russIan salad
69. macaroni salad
70. jellied fruit salad
71. tossed green salad
72. cher's dressing
73. french dressing
74. 1000 Island dressing
75. russian dressing
76. tartar sauce
77. hot sauce
78. bacon crumbs
79. croutons
80. parmesan cheese
Al. sliced onions
82. eggplant salad
83. cocktail sausage
84. hors d'oeuvres
85. stuffed grapeleaves
86. greek fete cheese
87. swiss cheese
88. ceddar cheese
89. bread pudding
90. rice pudding
91. creme caramel
92. baked apples
93. house cake
94. peaches
95. mandarin oranges

fitn I
A WEEKLY LATE NIGHT
PRESENTATION OF
FEATURE FILMS

Join The Daily Staff

j

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
NIGHTS
ALL SEATS $1.50

Arlo Guthrie
IN
"Alice's Restaurant"
11 :30 p.m.

-:
231 SOUTH
STATE
Dial
662-6264
5th HIT WEEK!
. WINNER
OF
17
.?. ACADEMY
(PG) all it takes AWARDS!
1 :30 is a little
4 p m Confidence , eSTNG
6:3a eSTING s
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BILLY
i }IThursday
April 11
NATUR)

Sunday 7&9p.m.
April 14
IENCE AUDITORIUM

ALLSO

,.. .

TRY DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
Phone 764-0558

THE GRANPE BOUFFE
"An outrageous, inventive, funny,
excessive Film. No one can claim
to have seen anything like it before."
-Paul 0. rimmerman, Newsweek
"A liberatingly funny pitch-black comedy. A chilling,
hilarious dirty movie that, tickles us with memories
of Fellini and Resnais and Bunuel, of Antonioni and
Bergman."-aster Hirsch, in the New York Times
AL.Em KLEIN ,..wets
THE GRANPE
AeJ
wr~c BOV~

./.
603 E. Liberty
11 a~~q IL " a NDIAL
665-6290
, CONRACK, YOU CRAZY!
That's what the black school
childrenw
at a remote
South
Carolina
school told
/ their teacher.x
One beautiful'
/man, his story
is true.
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT JON OIGHT
1. 3, 5, 7,&£x9 1 s
' 'C C.7l t ;
. .. .. . . . . ... . . .. .. .. . .. . . . . ... . . . . . . 7 '.. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .
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