100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 13, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Soturday,.April 13, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

PREFErENTIALBALLOTING:
li , . .., '?,,. .. sg .s| nl .:ag |s||r. .!54 t^i ll|||||| |||||N|I||||@ |||||||| ||||||.| if|||i _|||| ..|x|. x , ... h'|S|

<Pae Thee

HRP si
(Continued from Page 1)
ago ,no one candidate attained a
clear majority of votes. Current
Mayor James . Stephenson nar-
rowly edged out his Democratic
and HRP opponents.

tarts new petitiou

Stephenson garnered 15,172 votes,
while Democratic candidate Mog-
dis had 11,378 votes, and HRP can-
didate Benita Kaimowitz had 5047.
If the HRP plan had been insti-
tuted last year, the Kaimowitz

Local Dems. plan
excursion to 'thumb'

By DAVID WHITING
In the wake of President Nixon's
can'ipaign for Republican eighth
district congressional candidate.
James Sparling, local Democrats
decided yesterday to send their
own campaign corps to the thumb
area"to root for the Democratic
candidate, Robert Traxler.
The devision was made at a
Selecton of
LSA dean
set for Jan.
(Continued from Page 1)
weeks before they appear in print.
Then it will be a month before we
begin receiving answers."
"WITH THE job market as it is,
we'll probably receive at least 150
applications," she continues. "Of
these we'll probably interview 2S
to S0. Eight to ten will be called
back for a second interview. Final-
ly we will hand to President Flem-
ing.; a listt of three 'or four can-
didates from which he will select
a dean."
Summer will' also slow the selec-
tion process. "Although most com-
mittee members will be in the city
most of the summer, we will take
no definitive action during that
time," says committee chairman
philosophy Professor Arthur Burks.
"But," he continues, "we will
make progress and will be able to
make some suggestions in the
fall."
THE SELECTION committee is
open to suggestions for the new
dean. Burks says the committee
will circulate a letter to faculty
and students through the Daily and
the Record asking for names of
possible candidates.
Specific criteria for selecting the
new dean have not been discussed,
but Fleming, who attended the
first meeting this week, outlined
some general qualifications.
Fldming said the new dean
should demonstrate scholarship,
show "concern for undergradu-
ates," have administrative experi-
ence, the respect of his collegues
and the ability to relate to people.
Fleming also said he is comn-
mitted to affirmative action in the
selection -of the new USA dean.
The committee is responsible for
choosing specific criteria on which
to base their selections.

meeting held by the city's Young
College Democrats.
Democratic chairman for Wash-
tenaw County Tom Murray, ex-
plained the move as a "cam-
paign that has to do with the In-
peachment of Nixon."
LOCAL DEMOCRATIC con-
gressional hopeful John Reuther
is planning to make the trip, and
Democratic City Councilwoman
Colleen McGee believes it critical
that the Democrats go up, and also
hopes to attend.-.
Interested Ann Arbor residents
are mobilizing in one bus tomor-
row, and two buses will go on
Tuesday, the dayofnthe special
congressional election for the
Eighth District.
Nixon's recent campaign tour
for Sparling has created the like-
lihood that in the event of a Trax-
ler victory, Republicans will be
more inclined to dissociate them-
selves from the President.
ALSO PRESENT at the meeting
was the Democratic candidate for
the University Regents, John Ko-
za. Koza, a University student for
thirteen years, stressed thetneed
"to elect a younger person to the
board of Regents."
Student Government Council
(SGC) member David Faye, arous-
ed hostility when he questioned
Koza about his alleged activity in
previous scandalous SGC elections.
Koza was the coiputer program-
mer in the last several SGC elec-
tions, and has been accused,
though it has never proven, of com-
mitting fraud to get former SGC
president Bill Jacobs elected.
"I stopped running computer pro-
grams before the fraudulent elec-
tions," Koza responded heatedly.
"And I know all about you SGC
types," he added, and immediate-
ly left the building.
"I'm very concerned about Koza
running," said Faye. McGee
agreed adding, "He's a little de-
fensive for normal."
GERALD FAYE, Democratic
candidate for state legislature, was
also present and expressed his
views on income tax.
I'm completely in favor of a
graduated income tax based not
on income but on total wealth.
He also added that he has no
objection to liberalizing marijuana
laws. "If I want to get stoned,
beer or grass are the same," he
said as he gulped down a beer.

votes would have been distributed
between the other candidates on
the basis of second preferences.
According to political observers, a
vast majority of Kaimowitz's
votes would have gone to Mogdis.
Approximately 3,600 signatures,
or five per cent of the city's 70,000
registered voters, are needed to
place the proposal 'onthe ballot.
THE RESOLUTION adopted by
HRP Thursday night to begin the
petition drive also asks the Ann
Arbor Democratic Party and all
interested individuals to get in
contact with the party "so that a
broad based coalition can be form-
ed to push the preferential ballot-
ing system."
However, support for the pro-
posal by city Democrats appears
uncertain.
City Democratic Party Chairman
Laird Harris was unavailable for
comment yesterday.
But local Democratic Party ac-
tivist Tom Weider said yesterday
his party will "probably not" sup-
port the HRP preferential ballot-
ing proposal.
WEIDER maintained that "I
don't think the proposal serves
any useful purpose, other than to
allow the HRP to wage a high pro-
file mayoral campaign, without
being responsible for splitting the
liberal vote."
He added that the proposal will
"complicate the balloting system,1
and (in this way) alienate voters."

drive
Meanwhile, HRP official David
Goodman said yesterday that HRP
is seeking to implement the pre-
ferential balloting system for only
the city mayoral race because it
advocates other changes in the
city electoral system for the City
Council races.
GOODMAN SAID, "The prefer-
ential balloting system is most de-
sirable in the mayoral race,
where only one candidate repre-
sentsthe whole city.For the races
for the otheri Council seats, the
HRP has contended that a pro-
portional representation system
would be the best system."
Proportional representation allots
each party a certain number of
seats based on the proportions of
city-wide support for that party.
But the HRP has no plans to
take action towards a ballot pro-
posal on proportional representa-
tion for this November, according
to Goodman.
HRP officials forsee no legal or
Constitutional problems with the
proposed change in the city elec-
toral system, and say that the
Home Rule Act of the Michigan
Constitution specifically allows
municipalities to implement prefer-
ential balloting.
According to local laws HRP
has until August 1 to gather the
necessary signatures to place the
proposal on the ballot. Goodmanj
indicated yesterday that the party
plans to have the specifics of the
proposal finalized and the petitions
drawn up within a month.

BEAT GENERATION POET Allen Ginsberg waxes serious yesterday during a press conference hours before the Hill Auditorium appear-
ance. Following the afternoon session, Ginsberg awed reporters with a moment of impromptu meditation.

Beat poet Ginsberg still on
the road at the age of 48

Pulitzer prize winning
journalist Kroek dies '

WASHINGTON -) A r t h ur
Krock, winner of two Pulitzer
Prizes and a major figure in Amer-
ican journalism for over three
decades as a Washington columnist
for the New York Times, is dead
at the age of 87.
A family spokesman said that
Krock, who had been in ill health
for nearly six months, died of na-
tural causes at his home.
In a newspaper career that span-
ned 60 years, Krock was known for
his steady output of exclusive,
front-page stories, as well as for
his column, "In the Nation," car-
ried in the Times for 33 years.
He was the only American jour-
nalist to be honored with four
Pulitzer awards - two 'Pulitzer
Prizes in 1935 and 1937, a special
commendation and a special ci-
tation.
Krock had been with the Times
five years when then-publisher
Adolph Ochs named him chief of
the newspaper's Washington bu-
reau in 1932. His first column ap-
peared 15 months later. From the
outset, Krock demanded from his

staff the same enterprise and ac-
curacy that were the trademarks
of his career.
"YOU'VE GOT to know as much
about the subject you're handling
as the men who are making the
news. And for God's sake, try to
keep it simple,' 'he once said.
Realizing the growing importance
of new fiscal policies in the early
1930s, Krock himself became an
authority on the .economic theories
of the administration of Franklin
Roosevelt.
The stories that Krock develop-
ed, as a result led to his first Pul-
itzer in 1935 for "general excel-
lence" in reporting. They also at-
tracted attention in the White
House, and in 1937 Roosevelt grant-
ed Krock 'an exclusive interview
that resulted in his second Pulitzer
Prize.
His commendation from the Pul-
itzer board came in 1950 for a sim-
iliarly exclusive interview with
President Harry Truman. The spe-
cial citation, for distinguished serv-
ice, was awarded in 1955.

(Continued from Page 1)
The meditation community also
owns a genuine Japanese temple
built by six specially-imported Ja-
panese master carpenters. Medita-
tion is currently the focal point of
Ginsberg's life.
HE WORE a Jewish prayer shawl
and a Gay button yesterday, and
he seems to have an affinity for
almost every spiritual movement.
But Ginsberg's mainline of in-'
spiration stems from Eastern!
thought. That used to mean Zen
to Ginsberg but now it means Ti-
betan meditation.
"There are no mantras in this
form of meditation," he explained.
"There is no superstition or hocus,
pocus. Instead, you concentrate on
the rush of air from the nostrils in
b r e a t h i n g. Your mind'
meets space."
Meditation, Ginsberg noted, has,
had a profound effect on his
poetry. "Writing has become a
much freer process for me. Now
disaster is impossible," he said.
"There is no such thing as failure."
THERE IS an old Beat genera-
tion legend that Jack Kerouac sat
down at his typewriter and pound-,
ed out On the Road in six weeks,
Thisil
$2.50 8:S

on one long roll of wire service
printer paper. Ginsberg swore that
the story is true, and said he
thought Kerouac's all-at-once meth-
od is the only way to compose.
"I have been writing spontane-
ous prose," he said. "I am trying
to recharge the whole tradition of
an oral literature. A lot of blues
singers and calypso singers write
off the top of their head like this,
but there is not a secure place
for spontaneous prose in our lit-
erature now."
Ginsberg felt the source of pop-1
ularity for current spiritual move-
ments and introspective philoso-
phies is the turbulence of the last
decade.
"The sixties," he said, "actually
left physical scars on people. Da-

vid Dellinger has had gall bladder
operations; John Sinclair is very,
very worn. The movement toward
inwardness is useful."
GINSBERG was not above mak-
ing reference to his own declining
physique.
"When you've got a pot belly
like, mine," he grinned, "You've
got to unzip your pants to medi-
tate."
AV I ~

TRAVEL
presents
SEUROPE~
SUMMER FLIGHTS
" MAY 22-JUNE 20
" JUNE 20-AUG. 15
Fare: $264*
*probable 6% fore increase
due to fuel prices.
-other programs available
UAC Travel
2nd Floor Union
763-2147

owumams

w

. ;.
r
p

70

FOR MICHIGAN STUDENTS:

Part-time work in the area's newest
RESTAURANT, TAVERN,
ROCK & ROLL EMPORIUM
OPENING IN MID-SUMMER
Location: 516 East Liberty
. 90% of employees will be students
* 6 different levels, 3 bars, gameroom
Applications for summer and fall employment shall be taken
APRIL 15, 16, 17 at 516 East Liberty.
HOURS: MON., APRIL 15-3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
TUES., APRIL 16-10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
WED., APRIL 17-10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

I

I

Join The Daily Ad Staff

CA kh42 ~eP ice4

r

U-

64

UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
isters
Services at 10:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.
* * *

Min-

-0

BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH
John A. Woods, Pastor
900 Plum St.
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
Church Phone-NO 3-3800
Services:
Sunday School-9:00 a.m.
Morning Worship-10:30 a.m.
* * *
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
TION-State at Huron and Wash.
Sermon by Dr. Strobe: "Beyond
Jesus Christ Superstar."
Sunrise Service - 7:00 a.m. -
Wesley Lounge.
8:30-9:30 a.m.-Communion Serv-
ice.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Worship
Services.
9:00-12:30 p.m.-Nursery Care.
10:30-11:00 a.m.--Coffee-Conver-
sation-Fellowship.
Broadcast on WNRS (1290) AM
and WNRZ (103 FM from 11:00-
12:00 noon.
The Church of the Wesley Foun-
dation. *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Court
(1 Block S. of C.C. Little Building)
The Rev. Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Coffee Wake-up.
10:15 a.m.-Easter Celebration.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Service.
Everyone Welcome!

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 306S. Division
Holy Eucharist at Noon in St.
Andrew's Church.
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and
Sermon.
12:00 noon - Canterbury House
Eucharist.
7:00 p.m. - Holy Eucharist in
chapel.
* ** *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders, John
R. Waser, Brewster H. Gere, Jr.
"Where many students worship"
Sunday Services at: 7:00 (Holy
Communion), 9:30 and 11 a.m.
Sermon Title: "Death Has No
Dominion."
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC, LCA)
801 S. Forest at Hill
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Easter Vigil Saturday, April 13-
11:30 p.m.
Easter Sunday, April 14 - 10:30
a.m.
Wednesdays-Midweek Eucharist
-5:15.
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (Lutheran Church-
Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Easter Sunday Services at 8:00
and 10:30, with fellowship break-
fast at 9:15.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. - Mid-
week Worship.

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
OF CHRIST THE NAZARENE
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 409 S. Division (near William)
Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr. M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Associate Ministers: Dennis R. Church School-9:45 a.m.
Brophy and Howard F. Gebhart. Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
9 a.m.-Morning Prayer. Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
10, a.m. -Worship Service and
Church School. ECUMENICAL PARTNERSHIP
* * * 679 Broadway-across from
CANTERBURY HOUSE Baits Dr., North Campus
218 N. Division ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL
665-0606CHURCH
Holy Week Services at Canter- 8:30 a.m. and 10:00 a.m.-Holy
bury House: Eucharist.
Holy Saturday, April 13: and
10:30 p.m.-The Easter Vigil at NORTHSIDE PRESBYTERIAN
St. Andrew's Church. Agape Feast CHURCH
at Canterbury House following the 10 a.m.-Morning Worship.
vigil. Child care provided.
Easter Sunday, April 14:

I

ALY BAIN
AND THE
BOYS OF
THE LOUGH

Probi
}
MONI
i Pen

An Open Discussion on
ems of Women in the Arts

DAY, APRIL 1

5-8

P.M.

fiddle, flute, banio,
concertina, drum
1411 bill $TT
7IM1Sl

AT THE

1

I

dleton Arts In formation Center

No regularly scheduled activities
at Canterbury House. There will
be Holy Communion at 12:00 noon
at St. Andrew's Church.
SOON !

I

2nd floor Michigan

Union

"MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR SPRING-SUMMER"
Live at the
Ecumenical Campus Center Residence
an international Community at the University of Michigan

Sponsored by THE UNION GALLERY
in connection with its current
invitational show-"WOMANSPACE"

You are invited to

i
.

ammmmmmmmm

921 Church
0 air conditionii

* seasonal rent rates

* planned & unplanned activities 0 interestinq pe
-picnics, discussions, parties new ideas, op
for information call Ecumenical Campus Cent

t' Arducs by9V

': .
ยข
IS
}.!:
it ,{!:
\ :'
:1'!.

nq
ople-
inons, worldviews
er, 662-5529 The Spontaneil
APRIL
EDY
rs UNIOP
ER 1st

ty of Organized Movement

B

JACK COMI
& white lia
two plays by PETER SHAFFE
AGKfraI CCCrWukI TucA

L 17-8:00 p.m.
AT THE

r,

N4

GALLERY

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
presents

WR - MYSTERIES
OF THE ORGANISM
a .... .. . - .

floor Michigan Union

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan