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April 12, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-12

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Friday, April 12, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page TI' tree

Page Th

Wallace
to gain
black vote'
TUSKEGEE, Ala. (A) - The
black mayor of Tuskegee en-
dorsed Gov. George Wallace for
re-election yesterday and pre-
dicted that Walace, once a sym-
bol of segregationist resistance
in the South, will get more black
votes in Alabama than ever be-
fore.
Mayor Johnny Ford, who has
worked closely with Wallace on
governmental issues, issued a
formal announcement endorsing
the governor. He said in an in-
terview after the announcement
that Wallace's aid to predomin-
antly black Tuskegee has de-
monstrated his willingness to
"help all the people, particular-
ly those who really need it."
"OUR CITIZENS have come
to realize that voting for people
is one way of assuring that their
community will get at least its
fair share of resources," Ford
said. "That's what it's really all
about."
Ford, a Democrat, was elect-
ed mayor in early 1972, after
working for the federal M o d e 1
Cities program. He endorsed
President Nixon for re-election
because, he said, the President
had helped Tuskegee get consid-
erable federal aid,
FORD SAID he believes Wal-
lace will carry Tuskegee, a uni-
versity town that was the scene
of a number of racial demonstra-
tions a decade ago. Ford also
predicted Wallace will carry all of
Macon County, whose population
is 83 per cent black, and will
get "substantially m o r e"
black votes elsewhere in the
state than he has in previous
races.
Ford said Wallace has kept
every commitment he has made
to him, and that Tuskegee got
more new industry in the past
year than ever before. He said
that in that effort, he was "per-
sonally assisted by the governor
and his staff."
TUSKEGEE and Macon Coun-
ty were for many years focal
points of racial unrest in Ala-
bama. Until a federal court or-
dered the registration of black
voters, many with college de-
grees had been turned down
while illiterate whites were al-
lowed to vote.
The city and county both have
black voting majorities. Wal-
lace has never carried either.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
rda, Aprl 1U
Day Calendar
*Hospital Commission for Women:
W040 Hospital, noon.
Ediucational meia ctr., A. V. Ctr.
"Joyce at 34" "Take Thi Woman,"
Scoring Ad., MM, 12:15 p.m.
Baseball: U-M vs. Ill. (2 games),
Fisher Stadium, 2 p.m.
HopWood. Lecture and Awards: S. D.
Snodgrass, poet and critic, "Moonshine
and Sunny Beams: A Rumination on
'Midsummer Night's Dream," Rack-
ham Lecture Hall, 4 p.m.
University Players: Miller's --The Cru-j
cible," Trueblood Theatre, Frieze, 8
p.m.
Music Schol: Irene Brychin, clarinet,
Cady Music Room, Stearns Bldg., 8 p.m.
Music School: Timothy Vesey, clari-
net, Recital Hall, 8 p.m.

General Notices r
STUDENT ACCOUNTS: Your atten-
tion is called to the following rules
passed by the Regents on February 28,
1936: "Students shall pay all accounts
due the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or summer session. Student loans
which are not paid or renewed are
subject to this regulation; however,
student loans not yet due are exempt.
Any unpaid accounts at the close of
business on the last day of classes will
be reported to the Cashier of the Uni-
versity and
(a) All academic credits will be with-
held; the grades for the semester or
summer session just completed will
not be released; and no transcript of
credits will be issued.
(b) All students owing such accounts
will not be allowed to register in any
subsequent semester or summer ses-
sion until payment has been made."
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 154
Friday, April 12, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second. class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May.
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through, Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;other
states and foreign).

GUERILLAS ATTACK:

Arab terrorists

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
PRESIDENT NIXON shakes hands with James Sparling, Republican candidate from Michigan's 8th
Congressional district. Nixon toured the heavily Republican rural area Wednesday on behalf of Spar-
ling. Sparling is opposed by Democrat Robert Traxler who predicted that if Sparling wins next Tues-
day's election, Nixon will view the victory as a national mandate.
!s
Candidates continue to battle
in Michigan's 'thumb' district

kill 18
By AP and Reuter
KIRYAT SHMONEH, Israel -
Eighteen people, mostly women
and children, were killed here
yesterday by three Arab guer-
rillas who stormed a four-story
residential building, and fought
to thedeath with converging Is-
raeli troops.
The guerrillas died in an ex-
plosion at the end of a four-hour
gun and grenade battle, but it
was not immediately clear whe-
ther they blew themselves up or
whether the blast was touched
off by shells from recoilless rif-
les fired by Israeli soldiers.
SIXTEEN people were wound-
wounded in the incident.
Israeli officials described the
attack as the worst of its kind
in the war that Arab guerril-
las have been carrying out
against Israel throughout i t ' s
26-year history.
Eyewitnesses said t h e y saw
children hurled from third floor
windows after the guerrillas
stormed into the building and
forced their way into apartments,
which they sprayed with machine
gun fire, as they climbed to the
fourth floor.
THE KILLINGS led Prime Min-
ister Golda Meir to warn in the
Knesset (Parliament), "We re-
gard the Lebanese Government
and its inhabitants as respon-
sible for the Kiryat Shmoneh
massacre."
Such statements in the p a s t
have sometimes foreshadowed
Israeli retaliatory raids against

israelis
guerrilla bases in Lenbanon -
the last of which occurred a year
ago Wednesday when Israeli
commandos killed three guerril-
la leaders in the heart of Beirut.
Lebanese Prime Minister Tak-
ieddin Al-Solh said last night
that Israeli charges that Lebanon
was responsible for an Arab
commando attack on a northern
Israeli town were meant "f a r
local consumption."
"THIS IS NOT the first time
Israel accused the Lebanese Gov-
ernment in a bid to justify its
attacks on Lebanon," he added.
Solh said Palestinian comman-
do leader Yasser Arafat had re-
cently announced that commando
operations from inside Leban-
on had ceased and were now tak-
ing place from inside Israel.
However, in the Lebanese capi-
tol of Beirut, a Palestinian splin-
ter group, the Popular Front for
the Liberation of Palestne-Gener-
al Command, claimed responsi-
bility for the raid and said it
was a suicide mission to demand
the release of 100 Arab guerrillas
jailed in Israel.
W
TRAVEL
presents

SPRING
KICKERS
Kork-ease
Hot Sox
Clogs
Wedg ies
Flats
Sandals

EAST
WIWAMW
:' ANN ARBON

h ree

By AP and UPI
SAGINAW-The candidates in
Michigan's special congressional
election returned to campaigning
on their own yesterday in a race
that many think has become a
referendum on President Nixon.
Robert Traxler, the Democra-
tic candidate, predicted at a
news conference that if Repub-
lican James Sparling wins next
Tuesday's election, Nixon will
view this as a national man-
date."
SPARLING, on whose behalf
Nixon toured the heavily Repub-
lican rural area on Wednesday,
said he was amazed at the num-
ber of people who turned out to
see the President. But he con-
centrated on trying to get vot-
ers to decide on the basis of his
record, not Nixon's.
Sparling, who worked in the
White House for 10 weeks last
summer while a congressional
aide, invited Nixon to campaign
but said he would vote for the
President's impeachment if the
fact warranted it.
After Nixon's departure, he re-
leased a "Dear Friend" letter
in which he said:
"Regardless of your disappoint-
ments and frustration with some
elected officials - both Demo-
crats and Republicans in Lansing
and Washington - the energy
problem, unemployment and in-
flation, you should not vent your
disappointments and frustrations

when you vote."
NORMALLY, Sparling would be
a heavy favorite in the dis-
trict, which hasn't elected a
Democrat in 40 years. But in two
previous special elections since
the Watergate scandals broke,
Democrats have been elected and
some Michigan polls have shown
Traxler leading.
Sparling said in a statement
yesterday he approved the House
Judiciary Committee's 33-3 vote
to subpoena presidential docu-
ments.
"I urge that the tapes request-
ed be turned over immediately,"
he stated.
There was no immediate indi-
cation of what effect Sparling
thought the committee's s u b-
poena might have on his cam-
paign. An aide said he did not
believe Sparling discussed the
issue with Nixon during their
57-mile motorcade.
TRAXLER spent yesterday at
shopping centers and on a col-
lege campus. His main thrust
was that Sparling wil be "very
beholden" to Nixon if elected.
He also charged that President
Nixon skirted the real issues
and avoided crucial areas in his
campaign visit to Michigan's
thumb.
"IF MR. NIXON and my op-
ponent really wanted to speak
out on unemployment, why did-
n't they make their rosy predic-
tions to the unemployed auto

workers in Saginaw and Bay
County," Traxler said.
Traxler, who has made Nixon's
record his only campaign issue,
also had some outside help.
LEONARD Woodcock, presi-
dent of the United Auto Work-
ers, criticized Nixon for not
visiting the most populous areas
of the district.

I

g

m

PIRGIM
r Elections for Local Board Positions will be
held Wed. & Thurs., April 17th & 18th.
# Any Students interested in running for
the Board should stop by the PI RGIM office,
4106 Michigan Union, no later than 4 p.m.
on Monday, April 15th.
* For more information c o n t a ct Mark
Mitchell (665-7289) or Eric Fersht (763-
1704).
PUBLIC INTEREST RESEARCH GROUP IN MICHIGAN
A non-profit social change organization

I

SUMMER FLIGHTS
" MAY 22-JUNE 20

I

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY NIGHT
UNTIL 9:00 P.M.; SATURDAY UNTIL 5:30
CLOSED GOOD FRIDAY 12 NOON UNTIL 3:00 P.M.

" JANE 20-AUG. 15 wt N RO' W
Fare:264*wthA ARBRN
*Probable 6% fare increaseJR
due to fuel prices.
-other programs available
UAC Travel $2.00 admission
2nd Floor Union
763-2147 1'
THE WORLD'S BEST BOOTS at
Mountain BIVOUNC
Ann Arbor's only Mountain shop
Fabiano-Italy
Hiking and Climbing
Trappeur-France
Hiking and Mountaineering
Kastinger
Kastinger-Germany
Hiking and Mountaineering
Galibier-France
Hiking and Mountaineering
Herman-USA
Hiking

A UNIVERSITY PLAYERS SHOWCASE PRODUCTION
ThE; Cr uCr
by ARTHUR MILLER t
Trueblood Theatre

April 10-13

8:00 P.M.

GENERAL ADMISSION: $2 main floor, $1.50 balcony
Advance Tickets available at U Plovers Ticket Office in
Mendelssohn Lobby-764-6300

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/
/A

JAMES CAGNEY
HENRY FONDA
JACK LEMMON
"Mister Roberts"

I

TON IGHT
7:30 & 9:45
HUTCHINS HALL
Room 100
PINK PANTHER
CARTOON

0

K2(0~40

G$t2S

2 ACADEMY AWARDS

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
presents
BUTCH CASSIDY AND
THE SUNDANCE KID
Saturday, April 13th

BURSLEY HALL
West Cafeteria
9:00 p.m.

Admission $1.00

I

SALE
Keds Deck Shoes
6.50
this weekend only.. .enjo.
super-savings on Miss J's
favorite action-sport shoe.
Molded outsoles, airy poly-
ester/cotton canvas uppers
in white or navy. Sizes
51-10 Narrow and 4-10 Med.
Sorry, no phone or mail orders
4n~JAo

__ A AA04)
U '
5'447
" &e: o . 'a t
"_mss= uwtvaut4

WATERSHIP DOWN
A new novel by Richard Adams
for people from eight to eighty
WE'VE GOT IT
WE LOVE IT
YOU WILL TOO

t- 1k=

I

I

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