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April 11, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL.Y

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

WinL
m i

In
wall
By DAVID WHITING
Tower Plaza, a 250 foot tall ar-
chitectural blemish located at the
corner of E. William and Maynard
Streets, announced the names of
the winners in their contest to
come up with a design for their
bleak, cracking side walls yester-
day.
Architectural problems de-
veloped soon after the building
was erected and since, "the out-
side is falling off," related Ted
Wolff, the contest's organizer, "the
outside of the building must be re-
done."
Interest in the contest was keen,
with $500 offered as first prize,
$250 for second, and $100 for third.
Entries came from far and wide,
all over the country and even as
far away as England.
The age of the competitors was
varied also. Children as young as
grade school submitted entries, as
did graduate students in architec-
ture.
FIRST PRIZE winner was Tat-
suya Morita of the Cranbrook
Academy of Arts in Bloomfield
Hills. Morita wants to turn May-
nard street into a plaza and hang
a cable net work from the build-
ing "to soften the skyline."
The new Maynard mall would be
"the hub of Ann Arbor's com-
munity" and "related to the Uni-
versity of Michigan by Nichols
Arcade" according to Morita.

r

ters named
ewer Plaza
competition

Wolf doubts that much of Mo-
rita's plan will ever take effect
saying "the city fathers will nev-
er go for it."
AWARDED SECOND prize was
University Student Christopher
Sarnecki. He said three things
were considered in his plan: "the
concrete problem had to be solved,
the building was losing heat, and
the asthetic aspect." He proposed
covering the walls with insulated
bronze anodized aluminum.
Sarnecki plans to spend his prize
money at the Ann Arbor Art Fair
held in the summer, saying, "I
want to put the money back into
this community."
James Robertson of Lawrence
Tech in Southfield was awarded
$100 for third prize but was un-
available for comment.
UNIVERSITY students were on-
ly able to capture one place in
the contest because, as a Tower
Plaza representative put it, "Ev-
erything we got from the Univer-
sity was really pretty rotten stuff."
Other entries included pop art
themes reminiscent of Andy War-
hol's Campbell's soup cans, Indian
designs presumably representative
of the area, rockets blasting off,
plant designs, and putting up bona
fide advertisements.
A SUGGESTION OF painting the

walls as huge Ritz cracker boxes
won a novelty award and Wolf
was enthusiastic about this idea v
but added, "the advertisements
would have to be changed every
week or so to keep it interesting."
Another novelty prize went to a
"water falls solution" to have
water flowing from the top of the
building being caught and diverted
by outjutting concrete formations.
An exhibit of the contest will be THE
on display in the Pendleton room of is sh
the Union this afternoon. a stip
Ru-rrows
By JIM HILL readin
pleted
Poet E. G. Burrows read from briefly
his recent work yesterday shar- its ch
ing with the audience his vi- portion
sion of a world full of provoca- The
tive sounds, and stunningly beau- scure
tiful images. ninetee
In his rich, resonant baritone tress,
Burrows began with a series of of an
poems inspired by different Ameri
American locales: e.g. the Ever- feminh
glades, where a forgotten tribe chief c
of Seminoles hang on grimly to riage
life when all signs emphasize de- If hi
feat: eq
On the fence a dead moccasin They
Hangs in the shape of omega - -
Central to much of Burrows'
poetry is man's intrusion into
the natural word and its wild
pageantry of birth, struggle and
death. With a naturalist's re-
straint, an artist's selectivity and
a poet's love for naming things,
he suggests the scene and en-
dows it with a raw, vivid beau-
ty.

SECOND PRIZE design, which netted prize money of $250
own left, and on the. right is the third place entry, carrying
pend of $100.
Poeticvisi

g from his recently com-
play, Properties. After
sketching the story and
aracters, he presented a
n of the verse-dialogue.
play is based upon the ob-
diary of Fanny Kemble, a
enth century British ac-
who became in the course
unhappy marriage to an
can slaveholder, a staunch
st and abolitionist. Fanny's
concern is equality, in mar-
as well as among men:
usband and wives were
uals
.y could be friends

But one rules and the other
serves
Her role as wife and partner in
slavery soon breeds in her sen-
sitive nature terrible realiza-
tions:
The great virtue of women is
to be pathetic
I go like a whipped bitch Ito
my satin kennel
Fanny's diary, like the several
poems preceeding it, is full of
dazzling w o r d - associations,
t i g h t l y - turned memorable
phrases that the audience surely
carried away murmuring like
theme music.

The winner!
Shown here is the winning entry, in the Tower Plaza competition, for wall design. The first prize
was worth $500 to the winner.

Ginsberg comingto
do benefit for gays
Bhagavan Das kisses the feet of his teachers and wanders around
the planet like a big yellow robed dope.
If I thought I had nothing better to do I'd follow Bhagavan Das
around the equator singing Bloop Bloop Bloop Bom Shankar till I had
something better to do.
-ALLEN GINSBERG
FORMER BEAT poet turned spiritual laureate Allen Ginsberg will
chant his mystic truths tomorrow night at Hill Aud. accompanied by
holy man Bhagavan Das strumming the sitar.
The Ann Arbor Gay Liberation Front and The Gay Community
Services of Ann Arbor are sponsoring the event. According to concert
producer Stephen Miller, "We expect mostly the spiritualist corn-
munity to turn out."
Miller describes Ginsberg's poetry as "a combination of Indian
mythology, and history, American politics, travel, and sex."
He cites Ginsberg's gayness as a major theme in his poems,
adding, "He writes about sex in a universal sense of bodily functions."
GINSBERG IS NOTED for his spontaneous stream of perceptions
performances in which he chants long lists, that Miller feels are
heavily influenced by Walt Whitman.
Ginsberg's most widely read work in the long poem Howl, de-
clared legal in a famous obscenity trial in 1957.
Bhagavan Das in the Hindu name of a young Californian who the
late philosophef Alan Watts described as "over six feet high, with
long, matted hair hanging from his head like catkins, an abandoned
devotee of the Hindu Godhead who wanders the world in a seeming
state of perpetual ecstacy."
Bhagavan Das' rich, resonant voice and musical power become
evident with the release of his first recording, a two-record set en-
titled "Ah". Ginsberg writes:
Bhagavan Das is my mother that's why I kiss Bhagavan Das'
feet singing Ah A Ah Ah Ah!
The Ginsberg Das tour is seeking to raise money so that Bhagavan,
who Miller describes as "indigent," may return to India.. The concert
will also benefit the Ann Arbor Gay Community Center
DAILY OFFICIAL U
BULLETIN

I I
r
3
ARTS
i
I
f

THE HIGHLIGHT of
noon was Burrows'

the after-
dramatic

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
Clearly, Transcendental Medita-
tion is a major scientific discov-
ery. The practice is unique and
its effects seem to be unprece-
dented in their range and profun-
dity. The scientific studies will be
presented in a lecture Wed., 17
April. Mich. League, Room D &
E, 8:00 p.m.

A WEEKLY L
PPRESENTA
FEATURE
FRIDAY AND
NIGI
ALL SEA

FRANCIS ON "CANNON"
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) - Anne
Francis will star this season in
an episode of the "Cannon"
series for CBS-TV.
ATE NIGHT
TTION OF
FILMS
SATURDAY
HTS A
TS $1.50
uthrie
pstaurant"
p.m.

Ginsberg

PIRGIM
9 Elections for Local Board Positions will be
held Wed. & Thurs., April 17th & 18th.
* Any Students interested in running for
the Board should stop by the PIRGIM office,
4106 Michigan Union, no later than 4 p.m.
on Monday, April 15th.
0 For more information contact Mark
Mitchell (66517289) or Eric Fersht (763-
1704).
PUBLIC INTEREST RESEARCH GROUP IN MICHIGAN
A non-profit social change organization

Arlo G
IN
"Alice's Re

11:30

Thursday, April 11
Day Calendar
CEW: Secy. subcommittee, 2224 SEB,
noon.
Maternal and Child Health Film Fes-
tival: "Old Enough - But Not Ready"
RV 3042, SPH I, noon.
Music School: Flute Student Recital.
Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m.
Tennis: U-M vs Notre Dame, Varsity
Courts, 2:30 p.m.
Statistics: Prof. T. Stroud, Queens
Univ., "Combining Unbiased Estima-
tors of a Parameter Known to be Posi-
tive," 2203 Angell Hall, 3 p.m.
International Ctr.: European travel
coffee hour, lounge. 3:30 p.m.
MHRI: G. Hashim, Autoimmune
Disease Lab., St. Luke's Hoasp., New
York, "Myelin Basic Protein: Relation-
ships Between Chemical & Immuno-
logic Properties," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 p.m.
Music School: Musicology Series, Re-
cital Hall, 4 p.m.
American Heritage Night: williams-
burg menu, League cafeteria, 5-7:15
p.m.
Women's Studies Films: "Bette Tells
Her Story," "Caring More Than a
Day," "Virginia woolf," "Tomorrow
Again," Lee. Rm. 1. MLB, 7:30 p.m.
SGC: 3X Union. 7:30 n.m.

The University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
present NEW
YoRk
in theE
POWER CENTER H T

A MUS-ICAL COMEOY REVUE
A BaISSFUL ELIGHT."-.,
Jan. 17-19

THE
RIVER
NIGER

ANTHONY MANN'S (AT 7)
BEND IN THE RIVER 1952
A color western starring James Stewart, Rock Hudson, and Arthur Kennedy. A fron-
tiersman leads a group of pioneers to Oregon where miners and farmers line up
aoainst each other. SHORT: Charlie Chaplin's The Blacksmith.
F.W. MURNAU'S (AT 9:05)

'i ANO MOST IMPORTANM
S A J'U RY OF TODAY.- +g v

Fob, 14-16

_..N: & . C I FYJ.R
Starring to Neil Smon s

[Td!il'

w Ur

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