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April 10, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

RQge Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

Even,
By MARNIE HEYN
University Dancers and the
University's dance program
wound up their production year
last weekend with a five-part
concert at the Power Center. It
was an ambitious undertaking,
but audiences and participants
alike were pleased with the re-
sults.
Vera Embree, dance faculty
member, said of the series, "I
am very, very pleased with the
quality of the concerts, espe-
cially considering the number of
people involved and the number
of students who had never per-
formed before. I think we have
the best college program around
this year."
And Elizabeth Bergmann,
dance faculty coordinator, added,
"I feel good, but we can never
do a big series like this again.
There are too many technical
problems and it puts too big a
strain on us."
It is indeed a wonder that a
sub-department with only three
full-time faculty, three part-time
faculty, and five teaching fel-
lows could produce two major
concert series, a number of
smaller presentations including
masters thesis recitals, and also
teach the variety of classes that
is offered.
Dance on this campus has
come a long way since interested
students got to choose between
Folk Dance and Posture, Fig-

though

understaffed,

ince program shines

LINDA LEVY AND JANE SCHWARTZ perform a short dance "Senselessful", choreography by Jane
Schwartz, last Sunday afternoon in Power Center. Schwartz is a University graduate student in
dance. The performance was part of a program of new works by young choreographers.

ure, and Carriage to satisfy
t h e i r creative yearnings,
and talented dancers display-
ed their ability only in MUSKET
chorus lines. But the present sta-
tus of dance instruction is not
exactly rosy, and as yet the fu-
ture has no clear direction.
According to Bergmann, "Our
majors can't get all the courses
they need (because of the limit-
ed number and size of classes)
and other interested students
have almost no chance to get
in.
In spite of the fact that the
program has improved substant-
ially, financial and tactical sup-
port for dance activities is still
meager. There have been one-
time outlays for equipment, but
no financial growth and no fac-
ulty increase since 1965. Many
necessary production expenses
like room rental, costumes, and
union personnel salaries come
out of the pockets of partici-
pants.
"But the major question re-
mains where the arte are on this
campus," says Bergmann. "Stu-
dents who are interested in a
broad arts curriculum are out of
luck. The only way it's possible
is for honors students, and only
a few of them can be accommo-
dated."
She continued, "S e v e r a l
months ago Charles Witke called
all arts-related faculty together
to draft a statement, a proposal

for a unified arts program. The
statement went to (Vice Presi-
dent Allan) Smith. We got a let-
ter of thanks from him and from
Fleming. I don't know what
they're going to do with it, or
when to expect results."
In the meantime, hopeful stu-
dents will be closed out of
dance classes in droves, and
those who make it into sections

will encounter a plethora of
space, time, and money stric-
tures on their creativity.
Bergmann concluded, "We
feel we've done everything we-
can to demonstrate our quality as
a program and the interest stu-
dents have in dance. Now the
University has to demonstrate
whether the "A" in LSA means
something or not."

1

SMUSKET 74-m75
( Now Accepting Applications
for Original Musicals to be
considered for production.
Pick up Application in UAC offices, 2nd floor of
Michigan Union.
Applications due April 15. Info. 763-1107

TRAVEL
presents
SEUROPE
SUMMER FLIGHTS
" MAY 22-JUNE 20
" JUNE 20-AUG. +15
Fare: $264*
*probable 6% fare increase
due to fuel prices.
other programs available
UAC Travel
2nd Floor Union
763-2147

RECORD REVIEWS:
"
Morrison:

exuberant'

It's Too Late to Stop Now is a
Van Morrison retrospective - a
dozen of his songs from the past
eight years given a mature (but
exuberant) reinterpretation by
the Van Morrison of 1973.
The most satisfying pieces here
are loosened-up versions of the
best two songs from his superb
1970 album Moondance: "Cara-
van" and "Into the Mystic".
Morrison's vocal improvisations
and his amazing scat-singing
give every one of his songs here
a seductive new identity.
The new album was recorded
last summer when Van was
touring with his own "Caledonia
Soul Orchestra". The Orchestra
is a curious assembly of mu-
sicians: a guitarist, a bassist, a
pianist, 2 horn players, and a
five-piece string section. Despite
its odd composition, however, it
makes for a potent musical
unit, with marked surrealistic
leanings.
The total effect is not at all
"music by committee." The mu-
sicians are all old Van Morrison
hands, and know each others'
moves very well.
Morrison also breaks with tra-
dition by singing somebody else's
songs on this album. He pays
some dues to the great black
songwriters who influenced him
during his younger years, sing-
ing tunes by Sonny Boy William-,
son, Ray Charles, and other
blues giants. The grace with

which Morrison works these
songs in with his own material is
an indication of how much his
own work owes to these men.
-TOM OLSON
Tales F r o m Topographic
Oceans, the new YES album,V
is a brilliant display of the
group's musical ability. The five
musicians integrate their ef-
forts to create four long songs,
each about twenty minutes in
length.
The concept of the album
seems simple enough. Vocalist
Jon Anderson became interested
in some ancient Indian scrip-
tures one night in Tokyo. With-
in five months, he penned these
four songs as a tribute to them.
The lyrics are long and drawn
out; Tales gets to the point
where the listener doesn't know
what YES is saying and doesn't
care.
Actually, most of the high
points in the album come when
the group simply plays their in-
struments. Rick Wakeman's key-
boards, especially, add a lot to
their sound.
Despite most of the lyrics, it's
really impressive the way the
album is put together. The four
"movements" flow well with
each other, and as always, the
album cover is incredible.
--ELIJAH LANGFORD
Motown has assembled all of
Gladys Knight and the Pips' old
hits and put them into a double

album set of their Anthology
(f6M792S2) series. Containing sev-
en years worth of old songs, this
album is bound to bring back
some old memories for a lot of
people;
The album covers the period
from Motown's heyday with "I
Heard It Through The Grape-
vine", up to the declining days
when Knight finally left the com-
pany.
Newer music from the group.
would prove to be a more worth-
while venture. But, for anyone
who likes good, old songs, this
Anthology collection is a pleas-
ure.
-ELIJAH LANGFORD
MESB, which stands for Moth-
er, Father, Sister, Brother, has
been around for a long time.
They are a 33 piece jazz band
from Philadelphia which plays
back-up for such groups as the
O'Jays, the Intruders, the Styl-
istics, the Three Degrees, and
Billy Paul.
Their latest album is Love
Is The Message (KZ 32707), pro-
duced by the hitmaking team of
Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff.
Described on the album cover as
"instrumental soul from the cre-
ators of the Philadelphia Sound,"
the record demonstrates a su-
perior form of big-band jazz,
right from the mellow strings of
the title song to the ensemble
theme in "Soul Train."
-ELIJAH LANGFORD

7

U

I

Sster artists sketch
trials, for television

By JAY SHARBUTT
AP Television Writer
NEW YORK - While barely
in their. teens, the twin daugh-
ters of artist Harry Liebovitz al-
ready were regulars in the crim-
inal courts of Philadelphia - as
budding sketch artists drawing
the fine line of law.
Now they're grown, married, of
middle age. Each has three chil-
dren. But they're still court-
room regulars, still sketching
away. Only now their work is
seen by million on ABC and
NBC television news programs.
Oddly enough, neither Ida Lib-
by Dengrove of NBC nor Freda
L. Reiter of ABC has covered
the same trial in the three years
they've worked - on a free-lance
basis - for their networks. But

it almost happened recently.
Mrs. Reiter said she nearly
was assigned the federal court
trial here of former Atty. Gen.
John N. Mitchell and ex-Com-
merce Secretary Maurice Stans.
Her sister has sketched the trial
for nearly eight weeks.
Alas, an ABC News executive
in Washington, where Mrs. Rei-
ter has sketched Watergate trials
since January 1973, "would not
let me go," she said. "He felt
I was covering Watergate com-
pletely and he wanted me here
on a full-time basis."
The sisters are part of a small
network art colony whose spe-
cialized work is lucrative, if
sporadic. Network officials won't
say what the pay is, but indus-
try sources say it goes as high
as $100 a day.

I

I

SHOW

TIMES

WINNER
AWARDS
INCLUDING
BEST MOVIE!

Mon.-Sat., 7:15 & 9:00
Sun., 5:30, 7:15, 9:00

i

PAUL NEWMAN
& ROBERT REDFORD in
"THE
STING" (PG)
OPEN DAILY 1 P.M.
Shows at 1:30, 4, 6:30
& 9 P.M.

Upcoming concert trip
J Geils Band, a Boston-based blues/rock group, will highlight a con cert tonight at 8 in Crisler Arena. The band is well-known for their
recent albums "Bloodshot" and "Ladies Invited." Plenty of good seats are still available at the Union until 5 and at the door until
6:30. Nils Lofgren and Grin will also appear in the concert.

ROBERT FLAHERTY'S
LOUISIANA STORY (at 7:00) 1948
This fine documentary by the pioneer of the form (Nonook of the North) is a mov-
ing testament of the splendor of the delta everglades and the Creoles who live
there.
F. W. MURNAU'S
SUNRISE (at 9:05) 1927
This great German director came to Hollywood and made this impressionistic and
somewhat experimental film of a country man torn between his love for his wife
and his desire for a city girl. It made Charles Farrell and Janet Gaynor the most
celebrated couple of the silent screen.
CINEMA GUILD $1 Each Show ARCHITECTURE AUD.
~ -.-_

N
I
j
f f

Ii
{
t
i
F

ENDS TODAY

I

I

BANCROFT-LEMMON
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) Anne
Bancroft has been chosen to co-
star with Jack Lemmon in "The
Prisoner of 2nd Avenue," the
Neil Simon comedy to be pro-
duced at Warner Brothers.

RESEARCH'
Sen olyone dollar (refund- 9
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COME ON DOWN.
see .b'U5
on the air-LIVE!
Broadcasting from THE
SCENE at 341 So. Main
S t r e e t, downtown Ann
Arbor!
See - J.L. "Lighting" Hen-
' dricks and Bill Champion, plus
other favorites like: "Ludio on
the Radio."
Free Albums-Free Posters
Many Give-a-Ways Galore!

INGMAR BERGMAN'S
"CRIES &
WH ISPERS"C
at 1,3, 5, 7, & 9p.m.
STARTS
THURSDAY!
"ONE OF THE
BEST ADVENTURE
MOVIES OF THE YEAR!"
Kevin Sanders, ABC-TV
Escape ls
Everything!

-- M,'V

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