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April 10, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-04-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Boyle denies he ordered murder

.0

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MEDIA, Pa. () - Former
United Mine Workers President
Tony Boyle denied yesterday he
was involved in the murder of
Joseph "Jock" Yablonski, his
rival for UMW supremacy.
Boyle, 72, testifying in his own
defense at his murder trial, also
denied he had ever talked to
William Turnblazer or Albert
Pass about having Yablonski
murdered.
TURNBLAZER, the prosecu-
tion's star witness, testified Mon-
day that Boyle ordered the mur-

der during a meeting involving
him and Pass.
"Did you have anything to do
w i t h the murders?" asked
Boyle's lawyer, Charles Moses.
"Absolutely not," Boyle re-
sponded in a loud voice.
EARLIER, a former UMW of-
ficial who has confessed to hir-
ing the three men convicted of
killing Yablonski, testified he
had originally been approached
about killing another man.
Silhouse Huddleston, 65, for-

mer president of UMW Local
3228 in LaFollette, Tenn., was
the opening witness for the de-
fense in Boyle's trial.
Boyle, who was identified in
court Monday as the man who
personally ordered the slaying of
his union rival, was scheduled
to be the first witness.
HOWEVER, CHARLES Moses,
chief defense counsel, called
Huddleston as his opening wit-
ness after a 35-minute confer-
ence in the chambers of Com-
mon Pleas Court Judge Francis

Defense witness' account casts
new doubts on Mitchell's role

Catania.
Huddleston, who has pleaded
guilty to murder and confessed
part in the plot, said he met in
the spring of 1969 with William
Prater and Albert Pass to dis-
cuss the killing of a man named
Ted Wilson of Winfield, Tenn.
Pass and Prater, former of-
ficers of the union's District 19,
last year were convicted of
murder on charges that they ar-
ranged with Huddleston to hire
the men who killed Yablonski.
THE DEFENSE claims that
the plot to kill Yablonski was de-
veloped by District 19 officials,
not Boyle, in an effort to cover
up misuse of nearly $1 million in
district funds.
Huddleston quoted Pass as say-
ing, "Wilson was destroying the
mine workers and had to be
killed."
Later, Huddleston said, he
met with Prater and Pass and
was told "that plans had been
changed and that they now
wanted to kill Jock Yablonski."
Yablonski was killed three
weeks after he lost his bid to un-
seat Boyle. The election was
I voided by a federal judge, and
Boyle was subsequently defeat-
ed in a new election by the in-
cumbent UMW president, Arnold
Miller.

I = = --
Send for y
Sbig break of
coast.(Gra
N coupon to
Suite 200,
fornia 9021

our Student Identification Card and get a
n rates at Hilton Hotels and Inns coast to
d students and faculty, too.) Just mail this
Hilton Hotels Fulfillment Department, I
205 S. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Cali- g
2. Then come visit the Hiltons.

NEW YORK (P) - Insurance
tycoon Clement Stone cast doubt
yesterday on government claims
that former Atty. Gen. John
Mitchell warned a Republican
presidential campaign aide to
"stay away" from financier
Robert Vesco and his $200,000
campaign contribution.
Vesco's secret cash contribu-
tion, the government charges,
was the reason for the charges
of conspiracy, obstruction of jus-
tice and perjury of which Mit-
chell and former Commerce Sec-
retary Maurice Stans are ac-
cused.
THE TESTIMONY about the
warning had come earlier in the
trial from Daniel Hofgren, a
government witness at the crim-
inal conspiracy trial of Mitchell
and Stans.
Hofgren testified he talked to
Mitchell at .a reception that pre-
ceded a March 8, 1972, fund-rais-
ing dinner at the Washington
Hilton hotel, and that Mitchell
made the "stay away" remark
on that occasion.
Stone, however, testified for

the defense that Mitchell was his
guest at the $1,000-a-plate dinner;
didn't make the reception, and
arrived late for the dinner.
THAT LEFT IT up to the
jury to decide whether Mitchell
had the opportunity to talk with
Hofgren that night.
In an attempt to counter the
testimony, the government, on
cross - examination, drew from
Stone's testimony that there were
a number of other receptions at
the hotel that night at which
Hofgren might have encountered
Mitchell.
Stone, 71, a Chicago multimil-
lionaire, was the largest single
contributor to President Nixon's
1972 campaign, donating more
than $2 million. He picked up ,a
$10,000 tab for a table for 10 at
the dinner:
STANS AND MITCHELL are
accused of obstructing a massive
Securities and Exchange Com-
mission investigation of Vesco's
financial empire, in return for
Vesco's $200,000 contribution to
the Nixon re-election campaign.

Robert Finch, Nixon's secre-
tary of Health, Education and
Welfare and later counselor to
the President also testified for
the defense yesterday.
Finch said the consensus of a
campaign finance meeting he at-
tended on March 13, 1972 was
that names of Republican con-
tributors prior to April 7, 1972
would not be revealed. A new
law mandating public listing of
campaign contributors took ef-
fect April 7.
The government has contended
that Stans and Mitchell ignored
the April 7 deadline and kept
Vesco's contribution secret for
fear it might harm Nixon's re-
election prospects because of the
financier's SEC problem.

1
1

Address
City ...StateZ7ip ..

I
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1

College Class of 19
I
mXHILTONOTELSmm

AP Photo
Thetax man testifies
Vince Connery, a former Internal Revenue Service agent, now
head of the IRS employes' union, tells a Senate Appropriations
subcommittee in Washington yesterday that IRS agents are re-
warded for severity and punished for leniency. "No matter what
anyone may say or how many directives are issued, production
goals in tax collecting and quotas are the name of the game,"
Connery said.
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Wednesday, April 10 Psych. Film Series: "Masque of the
Day Calendar Red Death;" "What Man Shall Live
LSA Faculty: discussion, grad re- and Not See Death," Aud. 3, MLB, 4i
quiremients, Rackham Aud., 3 p.m. ,P.M1.
Education Media Ctr.: "Public Atti- Physics: G. Baym, Univ. of Ill., "Nu-
tudes toward the Physically Disabled," clear Physics, Neutron Stars and Pro-
300 SEB, 3 p.m. perties of Matter at High Densities,"
P & A Colloq. Rm., 4 p.m.
THEi MICHIGAN DAIELY University Players: Miller's "The'
Crucible," Trueblood Theatre, Frieze.
Volume LXXXIV, Number 152 Bldg., S p.m.
Wednesday, April 10, 1974 Music School: James Carpenter, oboe,
is edited and managed by students at Recital Hal, 8 p.m.
the University of Michigan. News phone' -
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning:
during the University year at 420 May WANTED:
hard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and Fre-1949 copies
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other statee of the
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday MiChiganensian
through Saturday morning. Subscrip 9"
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus.
area): $6.50 local mail (Michigan and BOX No. 4
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;other
states and foreign).

{
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III

People! Music! Food!
BACH -CLUB

I

GRADUATE STUDENTS WELCOME!

presents
an Evening of Classical
and Popular Spanish
Music
featuring
Kay WALKER, mez. soar. & piano
5:aroI CRAWFORD,
mez. contralto,
with a
MYSTERY PIANIST,
playinci pieces by
GRANADOS, SALLA, ORBADOS,
& DALLA PICCOLA
Thurs., April 11, 8 p.m.
E. Quad, Greene Lounge
EVERYONE INVITED
No Musical Knowledge Needed
Admission 50c
Refreshments
CARROT CAKE
served afterward
Further Information 482-5858

GRAD
COFFEE
Alp, HOUR
WEDNESDAY
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM

I' Ilii

Yearbook Mass Meeting
Those people interested in working on the 1975
Michiganensian are asked to meet
Wed., Apri 10-7:30 p.m.
1st floor Student Publications Building
Areas of Interest
EDITORIAL STAFF, PHOTOGRAPHY, ARTWORK, LAYOUT
DESIGN, BUSINESS STAFF (numerous staff positions open
and available).
If unable to attend call Marty Schwartz
at 764-0561 or 763-6166

Eli
i
i
.'
l F
I
' '
4
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e

i

11

II

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-I

Aill

SUBSCRIBE TO THE

SUMMER

MtrtAian

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FRi.-SAT.

THE SUMMER DAILY FEATURES:
0 Community and National News.

ALY BAIN

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BOYS OF

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" University Events.
s Sports-Including the late baseball scores from the
West Coast.
0 The (semi) Continuing Story of MADAM SOPHIE.

THE

You're serious about photography.
So is the Canon F-1.

LOUGH

Remember, the DAILY is almost your only contact with the University during the
summer months. It's a must if you're in Ann Arbor. And if you're not, you need it to
find out what you're missing.
To subscribe, simply stop by our offices or fill out the form below and
send it with a check for the proper amount to: The MICHIGAN DAILY,
420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104.
,.... m..mm........m....... m. mm. m m......m.. - mm--..--.------m---....... . m

To you, photography is more
than a hobby. You may never want
to become a professional. Yet, your
photography is as important a
means of self-expression to you as
your speech. You demand the
same excellence in your photo-
graphic equipment as you do of
your photographic skills.
The Canon F-1 is the camera that
can fulfill any photographic task to
which you put it. It can stand up to
your ability in any situation.

IRISH & SCOTTISH
DANCE MUSIC

LEAVE BLANK

Yes, I would like to subscribe to
THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY
(pre-payment necessary for subs.
outside of Ann Arbor, Mich.)

LEAVE BLANK

Naturally, a great camera like the
F-1 won't ensure great results.
That's up to you. Yet-it's nice to
know that your camera can grow
with you as a photographer.
Part of the reason for this is the
F-1 system. Since it was designed
in totality, it offers total perform-
ance. There is nothing "added on"
in the F-1 system. Everything works
as it was designed to, and inte-
grates superbly with everything
else. You'll spend less time worrying
about operating the camera than in
shooting. And that's what creative
photography is really all about.
Controls fall into place under
each finger. It's no accident. Pro-
fessionals who depend on a camera
for their livelihood have a deep
regard for the F-i's handling. It's
amazing how much a comfortable

Sharing these lenses and many
of these accessories are the new
Electronic Canon EF, with fully
automatic exposure control, the
FTb, now improved with all expo-
sure information visible in the
finder, and the TLb, great for a
second camera body or for getting
started in Canon photography.
Canon. For serious applications.
For serious photographers.
Isn't it time you got serious?

With Fiddle,
Flute, Banjo,
Concertina,
and Drum

TERM:

Illa

Illb

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III
Ir == mm mnm...... na...
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............ .....m.,
WED.-April 17
BENEFIT FOR THE
ARK BY
the R.F.D.
RAVWC

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[~ Stencil Typed

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