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March 31, 1974 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-31

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 31, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, March 31, 197'I

rr
..

JAMIE KEN WORTHY
THE JOB OF GOVERNMENT
IS TO PROVIDE SERVICES
FOR THOSE WHO:
NEED THEM

J. Kenworthy has been endorsed by the:
ANN ARBOR TENANTS UNION
ANN ARBOR SUN
The Republicans tried to influence this election by curb-
ing voter registration in liberal neighborhoods of the Fourth
Ward.
My opponent told residents near Packard-Platt that the
Chatham Food Store should not be built, and voted for it the
next day.
He has consistently ,voted against tenants rights, the $5
Marijuana fine, and enforcement of the Human Rights Ordi-
nance.
My opponent, William Colburn, would like to become the
next mayor.
End the Republican Reign of Error
VOTE Monday, April 1
DEMOCRAT
Fourth Ward

w

(continued from Page 3)
up in an attempt to decipher thet
shifting of political currents. "We
see an apparent loss of power in<
the liberal faction of the Council,"
commented one senior political
analyst.
Speculation has centered on the
apparent disappearance of Marcia
and Daniel Fishman, who have not
been heard from in over two
months. "The best guess is thnt
they were purged," says one ob-
server.
ROBERT GORDON, the newly
named Minister of Information, ex-
plained the decision this way,
"Since we have a clear mandate
from the people, we'll continue to
lead them."
Faye, Gordon, and Matthews
claim they have received 19 of
the 31 votes allegedly cast in the
last three years.
The new amendments to t h e
Constitution make, it a crime to
criticize the Council, any of i t s
ministers (formerly Council mem-
bers) laws, or procedures.
THE PRESS is also censored un-
der the new regime, since, as
Matthews explained, "Campus
newspapers had a regrettable, ten-
dency to publicize our actions too:
closely." Matthews noted, omin-
ously, "There's more than one way
to skin a liberal, you know."
"The criminal code has also
been given an overhaul," Mat-
thews continued. "Burns security
guards have been given orders to
shoot to kill in all cases of suspic-
ion of conspiracy, to commit a
crime."

SGC takes hard line

Immediate student reaction to
the move was difficult to assess,
since most appeared to be in mort-
al terror of speaking out against
the new regime.
In concluding his remarks last
night, Faye once again invoked
the Holy Trinity of SGC politics -
David Schaper, Bill Jacobs and
John Koza - in an. attempt to
sanctify his actions. "I have con-j
sulted with the spiritual heads of3
state, I have prayed to them for
guidance, and they have assured
me it is what they always dream-
ed of doing with Council," Faye
said.

BOTTOM OF BARREL
Macbeth':

Idjotic

tale

By FRANCES BACON
Daily Drama Critic
Out, out, damn playwright!
Bill Shakespeare has b e e n
shucking us for years. He's a
shrewd businessman, all right,
and knows what the public wants
(every one of his recent dramas
have been easy million-sellers)-
but his latest offering Macbeth
is nothing more than a tale told
by an idiot, signifying nothing.
THE PLAY is simply a fifth-

Bill Tremnble nostalgic
over city's road apples
(continued from Page 3)
SYNONYMOUS with the Spanish-American War.
Things are different now.
It is 76 years later.
THE STRAIGHT Arrow Bar is gone. Replaced by the Indian!
Summer Restaurant which does not even serve beer.
The Michigan Theatre showed "The Sting" last week. In the
movie women revealed their breasts and the bad guys won.
In 1927 Slim Trueblood died of mouth cancer. The green slime
is thick on his grave.
NOW LONG-HAIRED drug addicts burn Old Glory.
Now mom's brownies are laced with marijuana.
Now the Spanish American War is over.

rate hack rewriting job of Ro-
man Polanski's fine film of the
same name.
Macbeth is a general in t h e
Scottish army who kills King
Duncan, maneuvers his way into
becoming king himself and is
later killed by a nobleman nam-
ed Macduff.
Still, Shakespeare shows he has
some talent -the plot tiself
isn't all that bad; it has all the
elements of a fair mystery mur-
der story.
GRANTED, Shakespeare does
not have the genius of a Mickey
Spillane in this genre, but the
play certainly could have been
respectably thrilling.
Unlike the Polanski film in
which the emphasis is placed
properlyhon theablood'n'guts,
there's something rotten in
Shakespeare's Macbeth.
He tones down the film con-
siderably (likely thinking of the
financial damage an "R" rat-
ing could have) and gets hung
up on Macbeth's guilt complex
as he got hunt up on Hamlet's
inability totmake up his mind
in Shakespeare's regrettable pro-
duction from last year.
INSTEAD OF letting the aud-
ience wonder who killed Duncan,
he tells the audience whodunit
from the planning stages of the
murder. This is unforgivable sin
in any work in the mystery-
drama form.
He also makes a series of weak
attempts to show his flair for
"poetry," which point up his
limitations as a writer.
Shakespeare may be able to
crank out his detective pieces
and Gothic romances in be-
tween his busy schedule as a pro-
moter and brush salesman for the
Avon Corp., but he's no Mc-
Kuen when it comes to express-
ing serious themes.

ONE OF Shakespeare's great-
est weaknesses is that when he
backs himself into a corner in
the plot, he resorts to using a
variet of spirits, hobgoblins
and witches on broomsticks to
get himself out of trouble.
Shakespeare seems to be jump-
ing on the Exorist bandwagon in
his use of the supernatural in
Macbeth. The three wierd sis-
ters aren't involved in anything
as deliciously perverse as in
the Exorist, but some of three
visions they conjure up f o r
Macbeth present chances for
some rousing entertainment. Un-
fortunately these are the only
moments of relief in the entire
production.
Shakespeare's worst lapse oc-
curs at the end ofaMacbeth. Ap-
parently, he has added up the
bank balances on his = earlier
plays and has decided that his
so-called "tragedies" are m o r e
profitable than his "comedies."
THEREFORE. in Macbeth,
Shakespeare has tackled a com-
pletely forced "tragic" ending.
Macbeth is told by the t h r e e
sisters that "No man of wo-
man born" shall kill him and so
is confident of success.
Macduff, it turns out, is a pre-
mature birth and so is able to
do the deed, to Macbeth'sr sr-
prise. The whole idea strains
any conventions of believability
beyond the breaking point.
This sort of trick demonstrat-
es just what's wrong with this
work - Macbeth is clearly
Shakespeare reaching for t h e
bottom of the barrel.
7

I

MOST OF US can only sit back, shake our heads, and ask
has happened to Old Ann Arbor Town.
The answer is the lack of road apples.

what

$l00

except Fri., Sat.,
Sun., $1.50

Today you can look for days and days and never see one.
And after all, as the popular song goes, "If God didn't mak
little road apples, it don't rain in Indianapolis . ..

e

Arti1

ends Tues.,
Apr. 2

Li

I

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Weekdays. 7, 9; Fri., Sat., 7,
9,. 1 1; Sun., 3, 5, 7, 9-rated
G

Art 2

ends Tues.,
Apr. 2

DERANGED
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7:15, 9:00
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. w,

__.

Reprinted from the Ann Arbor News, Sunday, January 20, 1974
Rent Fiures

N

WATERSHIP DOWN
A new novel by RICHARD ADAMS
for people from eight to eighty
We've Got It
We Love It
You Will Too
WATERSHIP DOWN
by RICHARD ADAMS
0 05
6ooks~ore
1205 S. University

1... _~ 763-1107

COUNTERPOINT: An original

n

musical
y AVI

Misleading

comedy set in the wild west by
KRIECHMAN (a senior at U of M)

TODAY at 2and 7 p.m.

.._

Editor, The News:
The rent control article which appeared last Sun-
The rent control article which appeared last Sun-
day, Jan. 13, indicated that 1970 census figures showed
Ann Arbor to have the second highest median rent in
the United States. The article further indicated that
such exceptionally high rents constituted a strong ar-
gument for rent control. This statement as it stands
is to some extent inaccurate and could be very mis-
leading.
The median gross rent figure quoted for the city-
$167 month-is not the second highest rent of any city
in the country. Comparable 1970 census figures for
other cities in Michigan (from Detailed Housing Char-
acteristics, Michigan) include: Troy-$213, Farming-
ton-$192, Birmingham-$198, Westland-$173, South-
field-$256, Livonia-$176, and Beverly Hills-$300.
These, and nine other cities in Michigan alone have
rents ranging from slightly more to nearly double
those in Ann Arbor.
The most important problem in interpreting these
numbers arises from confusion among several categor-
ies used by the Bureau of the Census to present rental
data. This difficulty is the distinction between the
geographical categories "city" and "SMSA" (Standard
Metropolitan Statistical Area). In relation to Ann Ar-
bor, the "city" refers to only the City of Ann Arbor.
An SMSA includes a principal city plus the area
around the city which is closely related to it economi-
,cally and socially-for the Ann Arbor SMSA this is de-
fined as all of Washtenaw County.
The rental figures listed in the article-$167 and
$160-represent the median gross rent for the city and
the SMSA, respectively. (The gross rent includes esti-
mated utility payments, and is distinct from "rent" or
"contract rent," which may or may not include such
payments.) As previously indicated, many cities even
in Michigan have median gross rents considerably
higher than those in Ann Arbor. Thus, rents paid by

the rest of Washtenaw County) does indeed have the
second highest median gross rent among the nation's
SMSAs. The principal reason for the difference in our
standing between the two types of areas is that many
SMSAs are dominated by large central cities which
have older, frequently decaying housing stocks, and
are characterized by larger resident populations in low
income brackets. The Detroit SMSA, for example, in-
cludes many of the suburban cities noted earlier which
have higher median gross rents than Ann Arbor. How-
ever, it also includes the City of Detroit, with a com-
parable figure of $98/month. The Detroit SMSA is
large, diverse, and contains substantial areas of both
very high and very low cost rental property.
The Ann Arbor SMSA is much less diverse. In con-
trast to the Detroit area, proportionally fewer rental
units are found at the extremes of the rental cost
range. Thus, the median gross rent for the SMSA is
high relative to other SMSAs, while for the city it is
not unusual relative to other cities with comparable
income characteristics.
This clarification is not intended to be an argu-
ment on either side of the rent control issue, and by
no means does it suggest that Ann Arbor is without
problems in the rental housing market. Indeed, other
data imply that problems do exist. The forthcoming
report of the Mayor's Commission on Rent Control
will discuss some of these issues, as did the Ann Arbor
Growth Study previously published by the City Plan-
ning Department.
One final point should be made. With an issue as
complex as rent control, care must be exercised in in-
terpreting published figures. When numbers are used
on either side of a current political controversy, over-
simplification frequently occurs to the detriment of
understanding the issues. We hope that everyone will
take the time to Evaluate the implications of conflict-
ing claims.
William Duddleson,

LAST

6

DAYS'

D1' AUCTAIDE

NO GIMMICKS-Just Good Old Fashioned Bargains Because of
the thousands of items which we carry-it would be impossible
to mark down each item-oil regular price merchandise will
be discounted 20% at the Registers. Special priced itemsor
items with a Larger discount will be tagged. This sale is
ULRICH'S way of thanking our Regular customers and intro-
ducing ourselves to the many new people who might not of
heard of us-HAVE FUN-

DVVRI U C
549 EAST UNIVERSITY
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

X3OO,OOO

INVENTORY

SALE

INVOLVING EVERY ARTICLE IN OUR STORE ON BOTH FLOORS EXCEPT TEXTBOOKS AND CALCULATORS

GREAT SALE
1I A'VC

I

SAVE 20, to

,50

nW FVFRY not tUI AD AR nl SPENDf

E I

- ~~./I~VN LVCI NV'L.LAiKl I V J .gl I.

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