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January 15, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-15

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THE MiC.H1GAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY P~age Three

.

Nader blames gov't,
industry for oil crisis

I

SETBACK FOR LIBYA MERGER
Tunisian minister fired

WASHINGTON (JP) - Federal
Energy Chief William Simon told
Congress yesterday the nation is
threatened with "dangerously
low levels" of petroleum pro-
ducts, but consumer advocate
Ralph Nader said the world is
"drowning in oil."
Their sharply conflicting views
were presented in testimony be-
fore a House-Senate economic
subcommittee looking into the
accuracy of government energy
statistics.
"WHILE MANY DOUBT the ac-
curacy of the data being pro-
vided by industry," said Simon,
"there is no doubt in my mind
that we do indeed have a seri-
ious shortage.
"As of Dec. 29, the American
Petroleum Institute reported we
have only slightly over 30 days'
supply of the major petroleum
products. The shortage caused
by a full effective embargo will
quickly reduce these to danger-
ously low levels unless we act
quickly to reduce demand and
equitably allocate the available
supplies," he said.
Nader described America's en-
ergy problem as "unarmed rob-
bery by oil companies in collu-
sion with government support."
Denying an energy shortage ex-
ists, he said, everything that has
happened in the name of the en-
ergy crisis has been to the ad-
vantage of the major petroleum
companies.
"THE WORLD is literally
drowning in oil," Nader said.
"Any government agency can
create a shortage simply by an-
nouncing it."
Nader said geologists believe
that less than 25 per cent of the
world's oil reserves have been
discovered, and that the reserve
figures supplied by oil companies
and the U. S. government actual-

ly represents only about 10 per
cent of real proven reserves.
What appears in industry re-
ports to be an ample supply is
actually a result of conservation
efforts and an unusually mild
winter, as well as some continu-
ing supply of oil from the Arab
countries despite an embargo, he
said.
SIMON AND NADER agreed
on one point: the government
must depend on the petroleum
industry for data relating to the
supply and reserves of oil and
gas.
Simon said his office already is
taking steps to acquire periodic
reports from oil producers, re-
finers and distributors, and hopes
to have a comprehensive system
in effect within about six weeks.
Under questioning by subcom-
mittee Chairman William Prox-
mire (D-Wis.), Simon said it is
impossible to predict a point at
which the government would ra-
tion gasoline. He would say only
that he does not expect the av-
erage price to reach 70 cents per
gallon. The current average is
about 44 cents.
PROXMIRE SAID HE has re-
ceived 38,000 to 43,000 letters in-
dicating that "perhaps most of
our people doubt the existence of
the energy crisis."
Simon, acknowledging that a
"credibility problem" existed,
said there is "a tremendous mis-
interpretation that we are try-
ing to manage the energy crisis
through price mechanisms."
Nader recommended vigorous
antitrust actions against major
oil companies, particularly sev-
ering pipelines from producing
functions, and creation of a fed-
eral corporation, modeled after
the Tennessee Valley Authority,
to produce oil and gas from fed-
eral lands.

TUNIS (Reuter) - Tunisian
Foreign Minister Mohammed
Masmoudi, reported mastermind
of his country's merger with Lib-
ya, was dismissed yesterday.
The announcement that he was
being replaced by Habib Chat-
ti, one of President Habib Bour-
guiba's closest advisers, came as
Bourguiba was quoted in an in-
terview as saying that the refer-
endum on the merger, originally
set for next Friday, will now be

held on March 20.
THE RESHUFFLE was seen
here as a clear indication that
Masmoudi, who is reported to
have close Iniks with Col. Mua-
mar Khadafy of Libya, had gone
too far on the proposed merger.
The communique said Chatti,
Director of the President's Office,
had been asked to become For-
eign Minister. It made no men-
tion of what would happen to
Masmoudi.

High court to hear
right-to-reply case

WASHINGTON () - The Su-
preme Court agreed yesterday to
consider whether states may
force newspapers to print editor-
ial replies from political condi-
dates.
The Justices will'hear argu-
ments later this term on the
constitutionality of F 1 o r i d a' s
right-to-reply law, which grants
candidates access to newspapers
that "assail" the candidate's re-
cord or character..

THE FLORIDA Supreme Court
upheld the law, finding that it
} '.< enhanced freedom of speech in
pursuit of free and fair elections.
The Miami Herald appealed the
decision, and several major news
and civil liberties organizations
called the ruling a major and un-
precedented violation of the First
Amendment.
Mississippi is the only other
AP Photo state with a similar right-to-re-
ply statute, and the Mississippi
Supreme Court has limited its
s Capitol use to instances of libel.
orate. The largely ignored Florida

1972 when state legislative can-
didate Pat Tornillo invoked it in
an attempt to reply to two edi-
torials in the Miami Herald op-
posing his candidacy.
A FLORIDA TRIAL court held
the law invalid, but the Florida
Supreme Court found the law
compelling in the context of the
election process, which it called
the "fundamental precept upon
which our system of government
is based . .."
The right to reply "is designed
to add to the flow of informa-
tion and ideas and does not con-
stitute an incursion upon First
Amendment rights," the Florida
Supreme Court ruled. "There is
nothing prohibited but rather it
requires, in the interest of full
and fair discussion, additional in-
formation."
The decision on what and what
not to publish "rests within jour-
nalistic discretion which is pro-
tected against any governmental
intrusion by the First Amend-
ment," contended the Herald.

Bourguiba told the Catholic
newspaper La Croix that the new
state resulting from the merger
would "take the form of a re-
public which will be proclaimed
after a referendum put to our
respective people on March 20-
a date which will give us the
time to organize this vote."
WHEN THE merger plan was
announced at the weekend, Bour-
guiba said the referendum had
been fixed in principle for next
Friday, but he added that it
might be put off for technical
reasons until March 20 - Tunis-
ian Independence Day.
The surprise announcement on
Saturday that Tunisia and Libya
were to merge as the Islamic
Arab Republic was received by
the rest of the Arab world with
a mixture of approval and scep-
ticism.
The news came after a meet-
ing between Bourguiba and
Khadafy on Djerba Island, a re-
sort off the Tunisian coast.
THE TUNISIAN leader said
later he hoped the new state
would be joined by other Arab
countries to form "a solid and
powerful community, unlike for-
mer groupings".
Earlier today it was reported
by the weekly Tunis-Hebdo that
Bourguiba would be president of
the new State, with Khadafy as
vice-president.
Merger between Libya and
Tunisia represents a radical
change in the political orientation
of Khadafy.
LIBYA AND EGYPT had an-
nounced plans to achieve com-
plete political union by last Sept.
but the arrangement fell short of
a total merger.
News of the proposed merger
with Tunisia was received with
jubilation in Libya. Egypt also
declared its support.

Business aS usuali
Samuel Dash, chief counsel of the Senate Watergate committee, conducts business from hi
Hill office. Dash said yesterday the panel had "important new information". He did not elabo

Data shows highway fatalities

603E

decline with lowered speed limit

WASHINGTON (A) - Highway
traffic fatalities declined nearly
19 per cent in November in 16
states with lowered speed limits
but the death rate dropped only
2 per cent in the rest of the na-
tion, the Department of Trans-
portation said yesterday.
Fatalities also were compara-
tively lower during the Christ-
mas - New Year's holiday period,
the department said, with about
the same number of persons dy-
ing in traffic accidents in 1973's
four-day holiday periods as died
in 1972's three-day periods.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 87
Tuesday, January 15, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area): $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

THE SURVEY WAS the first
word from the department on the
effects of speed reductions, caus-
ed by the fuel shortage, on traf-
fic deaths.
The National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration predicted
the lowered nationwide speed
limits signed into law by Presi-
dent Nixon Jan. 2 will cause
highway deaths to drop by 4,000
to 5,000 in 1974 - 7 per cent to
9 per cent.
The department's conclusions
were based on preliminary
death - rate figures compiled
from 47 states, the District of Co-
lumbia and Puerto Rico. Data
from three states were not sub-
mitted in time for use in the
survey, the department said.
THE PRELIMINARY figures
were compared with preliminary
figures submitted by the states
for November, 1972, the depart-
ment said. The actual death toll
for both periods will be higher
because some persons injured in
traffic accidents die after ex-
tended hospitalization.
Dr. James Gregory, adminis-
trator of the highway safety ad-
ministration, said the new 55

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We need you for
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mile per hour national speed lim-
it could result in as many at 6,-
000 fewer automobile occupant
fatalities.
"Measured against this, how-
ever, may be an increase in fa-
talities of some 1,000 to 2,000 be-
cause of increased use of motor-
cycles and bicycles, an increase
in pedestrian traffic, a growth in
small car usage, and the possible
effects of car pooling," he said.
THE DEPARTMENT said the
16 states which reduced their
speed limits in November in re-
sponse to President Nixon's ener-
gy conservation plea reported a
death toll of 804 in November,
compared with a preliminary
count of 988 in November, 1972.
The reduction amounted to 18.6
per cent.
The nine states with 50 miles
per hour limits reported a total
reduction in their death toll of
127, while the six states with 55
mile per hour limits had a reduc-
tion of 40.
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COUNSELING
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Detroit, Mich.
"WOMEN HELPING
WOMEN"
call collect: 313-835-3770
* Comprehensive counseling and
referrals for any problemn
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*Unplanned pregnancy
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Personal Growth Groups
Weekly, one day, and
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peer counseling, separa-
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interpersonal skills, per-
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Leaders: RICHARD KEMPTER
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Theory & Techniques: Encounter
Gestalt, Role-play, etc.
Fees: $7/session, $25/weekend
Orientations & Screening
Interview Required
call RICHARD 662-4826
MICHAEL 662-2801

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OPEN DAILY
12:45
SHOWS AT 1,
3, 5, 7, &'9
" THE BEST
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EVER SEEN."
-George Melly,
The London
Sunday
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Dimensions of Religious Experience
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES
--PRESENTS---
JANUARY 16, WEDNESDAY 3-5 P.M., ANGELL HALL, AUDITORIUM A
Towards a Broader Understanding of Religion
By TED KACHEL, Director, Office of Ethics and Religion, U-M
A FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC *
NEXT WEEK JANUARY 23, WEDNESDAY 3-5 P.M., ANGELL HALL, AUD. A
The Philosophical Implications of Hindu Mythology
By DR. DAVID KINGSLEY, of McMasters University, Canada
As the Opening Lecture of a MINI SERIES on A SIAN RELIGIONS which will include presenta-
tions by CHOGYAM TRUNGPA, BAHKTI VEDANTA, BARBARA LINDERMAN,'& STUART GOR-
DON. Also included will be a film series on Asian Religions culminating with Sunseed, a spir-
itual pilgrimage to the East.
Sponsored by the Office of Ethics& Religion. Also offered for credit through Course Mort. Call764-
7442 for more information.

l

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A PROGRAM OF JEWISH STUDIES
BEGINNING HEBREW-for those who want to start from scratch.
INTERMEDIATE HEBREW-a refresher in Hebrew Conversation.
HEBREW SPEAKING CLUB-a chance to read newspapers and
converse in Hebrew.
BASIC JUDAISM I-a look at the fundamental ideas
of Jewish Religion.
BASIC JUDAISM l-for the inquisitive mind totally unfamilar
with Jewish life.
JEWISH HERETICS-a look at those who refused to conform.
THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN JUDAISM-women's role in history,
literature and law.
MARTIN BUBER-a study of his philosophy.
RABBI NACHMAN OF BRATSLAV-the life and tales of a
Hassidic Rebbe.
INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE-for those with limited exposure
to Bible study.
THE HASSIDIC VIEW on the nature and purpose of the universe.
READINGS IN MEDIEVAL JEWISH PHILOSOPHY-Spinoza,
Maimonides, Halevy.
THE GEOGRAPHY OF ISRAEL-What is the physical nature
of the Holy Land.
CONTEMPORARY CRISIS AND JEWISH LAW-Political Morality
from the Kings of Israel to Watergate.
THE ZIONIST IDEA-Socialists, Capitalists, Religious and Secular
thinkers whose writings inspired the creation of Israel.

r-- --- -

Syorgy A. Arbatov
Dir. of USA Institute, Academy of Science of the USSR
1973-74 Arthur Vandenberg, Lecturer
will speak about:
"The U.S. n the 1970's;
the View from s°

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