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March 29, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-29

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Schlesinger stresses balance
of nuclear power with Soviets

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WASHINGTON (P) - Secreiary
of Defense James Schlesinger
said yesterday President Nixon
"certainly would not consider"
rushing into a nuclear arms limi-
tation agreement with the Rus-
sians to build up his political
image.
The President "would do noth-
ing to compromise national se-
curity, irrespective of any poli-
tical dispute," Schlesinger told a
news conference.
The question arose after it be-
came known that Nixon intends
to go ahead with a summit meet-
ing in Moscow this summer even
though Secretary of State Hen-
ry Kissinger's mission failed to
break a deadlock in the SALT ii
negotiations.
WHEN ASKED whether t h e
Russians might think they could
take advantage of Watergate-
caused difficulties to gain advan-
tage in a SALT agreement, Shi-
lesinger replied:
"If they were to believe that,
they would soon be disabused of
that notion."
Schlesinger said, "progress was
made" at the Kissinger's meet-
ing with Russian leaders, but
the Defense Secretary indicated
that this was relatively minor.

"THE CONFERENCE resulted
in a clarification of some ques-
tions and a better understand-
ing on both sides," Schlesinger
said.
But he said there was "no re-
solution of the issues."
The stalemate is believed to
center on U.S. efforts to win
Soviet agreement to limit the
number and nuclear power of
multiple warheads for long-
range missiles.
SCHLESINGER repeated again
that the United States will insist
on what he calls "essential equi-
valence" between the United
States and the Soviet Union.
He -said there is "nigh on
universal agreement within the
U.S. government" on this q'ies-
tion, knocking down persistent
reports of differences between
himself and Kissinger.
On the question of whether ef-
forts should be made to reach
a new SALT agreement at t h e
Nixon summit with Soviet lead-
ers, Schlesinger made it clear he
feels this should not happen "if it
has been impossible to reach a
basis of agreement prior to that
meeting."
BUT HE SAID there is still "a
wide range of other issues ' that
Nixon could discuss with Soviet

Analysing Contributions
Common Cause Chairman John Gardner addresses reporters dur-
ing a Washington news conference yesterday. Gardner released
an analysis of congressional campaign contributions during"the
1972 elections.

Communist party leader 1 eonid
Brezhnev even if the SALT ma
ter could not be resolved.
On other matters, Schlesinger
said:
" The Pentagon is ".lose to
complete success" in fielding an
all-volunteer military force. His
statement in effect contradicted
Chairman F. Hebert (D-La.), of
the House Armed Service Com-
mittee who has described the, all-
volunteer approach as a flop.
" "We have begun to alleviate
some of the stringent restric-
tions placed on training" when
the oil shortage set in several
months ago.
0 He believes the new Ger-
man agreement to contribute
more than $2.4 billion to offset
U.S. foreign exchange costs in
stationing troops there m e e t s
Congressional requirements and
should head off any U.S. troops
pullback.
TINE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 142
Friday, March 29, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area) ; $11 local mall (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other statee
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
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FRI DAY,
March 29
Only

Staying in A

COVERAGE BROADENED:
Congress approves

This

S

0 0

7_! - 1

minimum wage tuice
WASHINGTON (M - Congress sent to President Nixon yesterday
a bill raising the minimum wage from $1.60 an hour to $2.30 and
bringing 7 million more persons under its coverage.
It would be the first increase in eight years. The raises would
begin in steps on May 1 and be completed by 1978.
Nixon is expected to sign the bill, although he vetoed a similar one
last year. Sen. Jacob Javits (R-N.Y.), tod the Senate that the White
House had advised that the bil would be signed.
AT THE WHITE HOUSE, Deputy Press Secretary Gerald Warren
said "the President feels that this bill is a step in the right direc-
tion." But Warren added that Nixon will not rhake a final decision
until the measure is reviewed by the Office of Management and
Budget.
Both chambers of Congress overwhelmingly approved a comprom-
ise version of the legislation within twoahours yesterday, thus ending
a three-year effort to increase the minimum wage.
The increases would mean actual pay hikes for an estimated 4.5
million workers. A total of 56 million persons would be covered.
THE BIGGEST GROUPS brought under minimum wage coverage
for the first time would be 1 million domestic and 5 million federal,
state and local employes. Additional retail store employes, service in-
dustry workers and farm workers also would be covered.
In one of the most controversial aspects of the bill, overtime
for police and firemen, a compromise was reached. Beginning Jan.
1, 1975, such employes would be eligible for overtime.
The Senate passed the compromise bill 71 to 19, the House 345 to
50.
FUTURE WORLDS CONFERENCE FESTIVAL
FRIDAY, March 29-SUNDAY, March 31
BIGGER AND BETTER than last year. The FWCF
will be all over campus with a chance for everyone
to participate now, in planning for the future. Dis-
cussions on Energy and Medical Ethics, on Elec-
tronic Music presentation and more. Ends Sunday
with a Natural Foods Dinner at South Quad. Starts
Friday on the Diag at 1 :30 p.m., where there will
be a Future Costume Contest. Win a prize for the
best costume!!

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Friday, March 29 Res. Coll. Players: Terry's "Approach-
Day Calendar4 ing Simone"; Brecht's "The Exception
51st Annual Undergraduate Honors;& the Rule," E. Quad Aud., 8 p.m.
Convocation: President R. W. Fleming, Music School: woodwind Quintet, L.
"Scholarship & the University," Hill Teal, bass clarinetist, Rackham Aud.,
Aud., 10:30 a.m.; 8 p.m.
Hospital Comm. for women: W10410 Music School: D. Blumenthal, piano,
Hosp., noon. SM Recital Hall, 8 p.m.
Educational Media Ctr., A-V Ctr.: CULS: fashion show, "Walk Together
"Nell & Fred"; "String Bean"; "To- Soulful People Take IV," Couzens, 9
morrow Again," Schorling Aud., SEB, p.m.
12:15 p.m. SUMMER PLACEMENT
John Dewey Lecture Series: A. Quin- 3200 SAB, 763-4117
ton, New College, Oxford Univ., "The Jewell Company, Detroit, MI. Will in-'
Pragmatic Theory of Knowledge," Lec. terview Tues., Apr. 2, 9:30 to 5. Will
Rm. 2, MLB, 4 p.m. call on regular customers, selling and
Katz-Newcomb Lectures in Social delivery work. Excellent money for
Psychology: H. Tajfel, U of Bristol, summer, Register.
"From Social Mobility'to Social Move- Frank Shama Gifts, Mackinac Is.
ments," Rackham Amph., 4 p.m. Opening for salesgiris and cashier.
Astronomy: H. Aller, "Centimeter Ob- Beautiful place to spendsummer. Come
servations of Variable Extragalactic Ha- in and check on details.
dio Sources," P-A Bldg. Colloq. Rm., 4 Camp Tamarack, MI Coed. Will inter-
p.m. view Fri., Apr. 5, 9:30 to 5. Counselors
U Players: "Brave Little Tailor,"' for (boys 8 to 10), kitchen help, bus/
Arena Theatre, Frieze, 7:30 p.m. truck driver, nature specialist. Register.
university cellar
Apri Fools Book Sale
lasts through Monday-
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"The present city budget crisis must not be used as an excuse to
eliminate city funding for social services. City support must con-
tinue for child care centers, a much-needed service to the com-
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