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March 28, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Dunlop urges price,
wage curbs remain

Syria
clas fh for
16th day
TEL AVIV (Reuter) - Syrian
artillery wounded two Israeli sol-
diers and damaged a U.N. out-
post yesterday on the eve of
Israeli Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan's departure to Washing-
ton for talks on Israeli-Syrian
disengagement, a spokesperson
said.
Premier Golda Meir told an'
"audience at Jerusalem's Hebrew
University that Israel was will-
ing to withdraw from part of the
Syrian territory captured last
October but would not give up
land occupied since the 1967 Six
Day War.
, Israel's refusal on this point,
and Syria's insistence, is ex-
pected to make a disengagement
like the one worked out with
Egypt much more difficult.
Meir also said that United
States reconnaissance aircraft
had spotted artillery placed by
Egypt on the East Bank of the
Suez Canal which Israel says vio-
lates the disengagement accord
negotiated by Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger. But Meir said
she was hopeful the dispute,
could be settled.
She also confirmed earlier re-
ports that Kissinger would return
to the Middle East next month
for Israeli - Syrian disengage-
ment negotiations.
A Syrianspokesman in Damas-
cus said the firing on the Heights
-the 16th consecutive day of ar-
tillery battles -- had spread to
several sectors of the front. He
blamed Israel for opening fire
and said Syria inflicted more
losses on Israel.
On the Egyptian artillery dis-
pute, Meir said when Israel told
the U. S. of the alleged viola-
tion, the Americans "were not
surprised." She said the U. S.
had permanent flights over the
Suez Canal to check on imple-
mentation of the disengagement
pact.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 141
Thursday, March 28, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
784-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: ,$10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); ;11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other stater
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area): X6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio);00 ,0non-local mail pother
states and foreign).

WASHINGTON (P) - J o h n
Dunlop, director of the Cost of
Living Council urged again yes-
terday that Congress continue
authority for wage and price con-
trols over the health and con-
struction industries.
Dunlop also said the Council
feels it is essential that it have
authority to enforce price-re-
straining commitments given in
recent months by major indus-
tries.
"We want a statutory base to
see that price commitments
made to us are honored. It would
be unthinkable that major com-
panies of the country w o u I d
make commitments. . . and then
feel free to abrogate those under-
standings," Dunlop said at a
news briefing.
Dunlop said he is still hopeful
that Congress will grant the ad-
ministration the limited author-
ity it has asked for continued
controls, even though the Sen-
ate Banking Committee Tuesday
decided to let controls expire on
April 30.
"The country must work hard
on the inflation problem . . . we
need to perfect new tools, the
kind of thing we have recom-
mended to Congress," Dunlop
said.
sunlop said there may be a
misunderstanding that the admin-

istration is seeking to continue
authority for general mandatory
controls.
Instead, he said, the admin-
istration wants controls author-
ity over health and construction,
authority to enforce price re-
straining commitments and au-
thority for the council to engage
in anti-inflation activities, such
as price monitoring.
"I want to stress the serious
problem in health and probably
construction," Dunlop said.
He said these two industries
are areas where the free market
has not worked in the past., in
part because the government
role has been very large and
where there is expected to be a
big increase in demand.

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
presents
FRANCO ZEFFERELLI'S
"ROMEO
AND
JULIET"
BURSLEY HALL, West Cafeteria-9:00 p.m.
Friday and Saturday, March 29th & 30th
ISGC Wants Students
for
University Committees
Union Board of Directors
Commission for Women
Student Relations
Research Policies
Paper Conservation Task Force
U. Cellar Board of Directors

AP Photo
Chicken feathers
Employes of a Magee, Miss. chicken raiser Tuesday threw contaminated chickens into a dump truck-
turned gas chamber. Millions of Mississippi chickens are being destroyed because of possible harmful
contamination.

Attention
Advertisers
Let your voice
reach the students
of Michigan
ADD THE AIRWAVES OF
to your promotional
campaign
763-3501

-ALSO-

Director of Public Relations

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1974 meat prices
UP from last year

Even in this late stage in the school year, these committees need
people starting NOW (esp. the Paper Task Force) and extend-
ing through next school year-good idea to plan next year's
activities now.
Interviews for all positions will be Thurs., Mon. and Tues.
(March 28, April 1 & 2). Stop by the SGC offices, third floor
of the Union, to sign up for an interview and pick up on appli-
cation form, or if you need more information.

A
By The Associated Press
One year after the week-long
meat boycott called by consum-
Iers to protest rising prices, at,,
Associated Press survey shows
that meat generally is more ex-
pensive than ever at the retail
level.
The shopper who sticks to spe-
cials can come up with a meat
bill lower than last year. Whole-
sale prices are down- because
of increased supplies that piled
up during the January truckers'
strike and because people a r e'
buying less meat.
Over-all, however, meat p-ic
es are generally higher than they
were last year in 19 cities check-
ed by the AP last April 1 and
again this week. The AP survey
covered seven meat items -
round steak, pork chops, chopped
chuck, sirloin steak, iamb chops,
leg of lamb and standing rib
roast.
Fifty-six per cent of the items
checked were higher in price; 26
per cent were lower; 10 per cent
were unchanged; and eight per
cent were unavailable on one of

the two survey dates.
Beef items generally inci-' aseJ
more than other meats, bttt there
was no clear pattern. Chopped
chuck, for example, was tup in
24 per cent. It was down in Ve
12 cities, rising an average of
cities, decreasing an ave-age of
12 per cent, and was unchar.ged
in two.
Pork chops seemed to he the
best buy - they went down in
eight cities over the 12-month
period.

Pd. Political Adv.

--- I

NOON LUNCHEON
SOUP & SANDWICH-40c
FRIDAY, MARCH 29
BETH BRUNTON, HRP Candidate 1st Ward:
"Rent Control & City Budget"
FRIDAY EVENING-,-6 P.M.
Pennsylvania Dutch Dinner-$1.25
for reservations call 662-5189
GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
(Across from Law School)
SHARE THE RIDE
WITH US THIS
WEEKEND
AND,,GET ON
TO A GOOD THING
Us means Greyhound, and a lot of your fellow students
who are already on to a good thing. You leave when you
like. Travel comfortably. Arrive refreshed and on time.
You'll save money, too, over the increased standby air
fares. Share the ride with us on weekends. Holidays.
Anytime. Go Greyhound.

- A Mountain Shop
in Ann Arbor
Mountain Bivouac in Nickels Arcade
Packs for Backpacking
- ~-Packs for Climbing &
Mountaineering
Packs for Bicycling
Packs for European &
General Trucken
PACKS by: Mountain Master, Trailwise, Universal, Camp Trails,
.Chouinard, Forest Mountaineering, Cammondale and others.
Also a wide selection of the finest
Sleeping Bags, Tents, Hiking Boots,
Climbing Equipment and accessories
Bivouac & Mountain Bivouac
330 S. State St., Ann Arbor
(Nickels Arcade) 761-6207
Akadama Mama says,
BeNOice tMce.
This week's letters
were kind of club soda, l of a can of frozen lemon-
dull, but I did get ade concentrate, plenty of ice and
a neat package. lemon and orange slices. To make
It contained a home more just double, triple or quadruple
built mouse trap. Not everything.
one of those hurtful, snapper, killer, Listen to Mama, and pass
5 & 10 things. But a genuine can't-hurt- the Akadama, the wine that tastes
you- and- I'm- sorry-if- I-scared-you a lotmore than it costs.
kind of a thing. It was made of scrap %
wood and window screen (see illus.) 1 .
and I got a very together friend of#me dpin-
mine to do a blueprint and instruc- ~ /
tions. I also have a friend with a copy
machine, so if you'd like a copy of the j
plan just mail me the mouse coupon. -
Now that we've 4
been nice to mice,
I'd like to giveyou t0
- a cou p le of m y " -a"" * "" ! "!" "f " j
favorite Akadama% Mail to: Be Nice To Mice 1%
recipes that will t-- ( P.O. Box 2629
be nice to you. %f Palos Verdes Peninsula, Ca. 90274
a~ka~st AKADAMA OfAkadama Mama, please lay a copy of
your very together friends blueprints
PLUM & 7UPI & instructions on me.
#A ~ ' l4 13f i 2t Rnae . T,.

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- SPRING
.TYPEWRITER SALE

I1

10% DISCOUNT
on all OLYMPIA
and SCM
MACHINES
with this ad
(Offer expires
April 13, 1974)

i
.
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8:55 9.90 18.85

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1W

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