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March 22, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE.MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Consumer index leaps
to near-record levels

AP Photo
BRITISH POLICEMEN search for clues in London's Mall the morning after the gun attack on Prin-
cess Anne and her husband, Captain Mark Phillips. A suspect was detained in the case yesterday.
ANNE'S.ASSAILANT:
Kidnapping suspect taken

WASHINGTON (P) - The Con-
sumer Price Index for Febru-
ary, released yesterday showed
that food prices increased again
sharply.
"Our own estimate is that it
will be the last month with a
really poor record," Dunlop of
the Cost of Living Council said
Wednesday. He said food prices
in March, April and May should.
increase at a much more moder-
ate rate than in previous months.
THE 1.3 per cent rise in con-
sumer prices last month, the
same both seasonally and un-
adjusted, was the second big-
gest monthly jump since Febru-
ary 1951 and was exceeded only
by the 1.9 per cent increase re-
corded last August following the
lifting of the administration's
price freeze.
Food prices rose 23.per cent
last month, while non-food com-
modities increased 1 per cent,
and services climbed seven-
tenths of 1 per cent .
The increase in nonfood com-
modities was traceable to a con-
tinued rise in fuel prices, with
gasoline and motor oil up 5.3
per cent to a level 30.9 per cent
above a year ago.
GASOLINE alone jumped 5.5
per cent over the month, with
the price of regular grade gas
increasing to a national average
of 49.1 cents per gallon and pre-
mium up to 52.7 cents per gallon.
Prices also rose for apparel,
household goods and newspapers.
Used car prices dropped sharp-

ly, while new car prices also
fell, but at a rate less than us-
ual in February.
GROCERY prices - the major
portion of the food index -
were up 3 per cent last month,
substantially more than usual for
February, the government said.
The price of restaurant meals
and snacks - food away from
home-was up sevenths of 1 per
cent. .
The surge in- beef prices fol-
lowed a smaller increase in Jan-
uary and declines in the last
three months of 1973. Fresh vege-
table prices also rose last month
instead of falling as they usually
do. About the only decline in
food prices was that for poultry.
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
+:.xr:x+ ;r?'a e'::}: 3{"::.°:t.{S {=<i:';i:":::;:::t;

mediatrics presents
SOUNDER
Heart-warming award winning film; starring Cicley Tyson
"A Film of rare warmth and beauty."
ALSO-
Atlantic Records Silver Anniversary Special
A special film documentary showing musical highlights and insights
into the workings of a record compony. Courtesy of WCBN & Atlantic
Records.
FRI. & SAT. NAT. SCI. AUD. 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00

LONDON (MP) - Unemployed Englishman Ian Ball
was charged yesterday with attempted murder dur-
ing an abortive attempt to kidnap Princess Anne
near Buckingham Palace. The government ordered
tighter'security for the royal family.
Four persons were wounded in the shooting 150
yards from the palace Wednesday night. Anne, 23-
year-old daughter of Queen Elizabeth II, and her
husband, cavalry Capt. Mark Phillips, were unhurt.
"THERE IS NO present indication that this was
other than an isolated act by an individual," Home
Secretary Roy Jenkins told the House of Commons.
But he ordered security arrangements for the royal
family and other prominent persons tightened.
He said he had discussed with London Police Com-

missioner Robert Mark "such actions as seems sen-
sible to increase the safeguards already taken
against attacks like the one last night on Princess
Anne." He said their conclusions, to be effective,
would have to remain secret.
Jenkins said the object was to "achieve the great-
est degree of security without an unacceptable inter-
ference with the ability of public figures to lead
lives as nearly normal as possible."
BALL, 26, MADE a 60-second appearance at Lon-
don's Bow Street Court and was ordered held for a
week while police continued their investigation of
the first attack on royalty since 1939.
Police informants said they were trying to dis-
cover the source of a large sum of money in Ball's
possession.

L

Dr ttery--winnng numbers

WASHINGTON AP -- Following is
the birthdates and sequence numbers
rated in the annual standby draft lot-
tery by Selective Service Wednesday:
JANUARY Feb. 17-357
Jan. 1-70 Feb. 18-159
Jan. 2-134 Feb. 19-301
Jan. 3-41 Feb. 20-76
Jan. 4-77 Feb. 21-188
Jan. 5-2 Feb. 22-133
Jan. 6-349 Feb. 23-114
Jan. 7-87 Feb. 24-90
Jan. 8-215 Feb. 25-207
Jan. 9-229 Feb. 26-242
Jan. 10-173 Feb. 27- 52
Jan. 11-352 Feb. 28-1
Jan. 12-58 MARCH
Jan. 13-60 March 1-26
Jan. 14-189 March 2-53
Jan. 15-109 March 3-280
Jan.-16-248 March 4-292
Jan. 17-101 March 5-228
Jan. 18-55 March 6-7
Jan. 19-208 March 7-165
Jan. 20-100 March 8-56
Jan. 21-44 March 9-340
Jan. 22-269 March 10-344
Jan. 23-355 March 11.250
Jan. 24-264 March 12-139
Jan. 25-362 March 13-6
Jan. 26-164 Ma.rch 14-42
Jan. 27-323 March 15-102
Jan. 28-278 March 16-103
Jan. 29-184 March 17-46
Jan. 30-303 March 18-261
Jan. 31-168 March 19-257
FEBRUARY March 20-136
Feb. 1-191 March 21-49
Feb. 2-116 March 22-267
Feb. 3-155 March 23-226
Feb. 4-341 March 24-4
Feb. 5-18 March 25-237
Feb. 6.128 March 26-205
Feb. 7-219 March 27-162
Feb, 8-333 March 28-35
Feb.9-67 March 29-54
Feb. 10-244 March 30-15
Feb. 11-312 March 31-334

April 5-23
April 6-30
April 7-227
April 8-200
April 9-286
April 10-306
April 11-32
April 12-179
April 13256
April 14-48
April 15-213
April 16-325
April 17-330
April 18-335
April 19-282
April 20-75
April 21-283
April 22-206
April 23-141
April 24-190
April 25-.170
April 26-277
April 27-125
April 28-216
April 29-365
April 30-65
MAY
May 1-214
May 2-161
May 3-343
May 4289
May 5-348
May 6-156
May 7-331
May 8-169
May 9-198
May 10-177
May 11-12
May 12-117
May 13-111
May 14-346
May 15-338
May 16-234
May 17-106
May 18-16
May 19-45
May 20-57
May 21-232
May 22-247
May 23-299
May 24-248
May 25-314
May 26.249

May 27-112
May 28-89
May 29-14
May 30-137
May 31-74
JUNE
June 1-253
June 2-309
June 3-180
June 4-361
June 5-345
June 6121
June 7-320
June 8-20
June 9-307
June 10-240
June 11-27
June 12-254
June 13-313
June 14-129
June 15-135
June 16-130
June 17-175
June 18-183
June 19-263
June 20-322
June 21-203
June 22-11
June 23-326
June 24-239
June 25-202
June 26-288
June 27-5
June 28-298
June 29-230
June 30-186
JULY
July 1-119
July 2-192
July 3-290
July 4-318
July 5-31
July 6-195
July 7-62
July 8-225
July 9-270
July 10-354
July 11-276
July 12-86
July 13-23
July 14-243
July 15-178
July 16-122

July 17-363
July 18-351
July 19-66
July 20-280
July 21-147
July 22-25
July 23-167
July 24-13
July 25-218
July 26-140
July 27-39
July 28-221
July 29-304
July 30-217
July 31-339
AUGUST
Aug. 1-79
Aug. 2-82
Aug. 3-360
Aug. 4-295
Aug. 5-148
Aug. 6-317
Aug. 7-131
Aug. 8-262
Aug. 9-33
Aug. 10-99
Aug. 11-??l
Aug. 12-85
Aug. 13-268
Aug. 14-220
Aug. 15-127
Aug. 16-96
Aug. 17-80
Aug. 18-241
Aug. 19-94
Aug. 20-305
Aug. 21-294
Aug. 22.279
Aug. 23-329
Aug. 24-199
Aug. 25-327
Aug. 26-88
Aug. 27-265
Aug. 28-21

Aug. 29-154
Aug. 30-107
Aug. 31-64
SEPTEMBER
Sept. 1-204
Sept. 2-28
Sept. 3-51
Sept. 4-151
Sept. 5-24
Sept. 6-337
Sept. 7-108
Sept. 8-271
Sept. 9-61
Sept. 10-302
Sept. 11-29
Sept. 12-40
Sept. 13-124
Sept. 14-222
Sept. 15-245
Sept. 16-281
Sept. 17-342
Sept. 18-120
Sept. 19-150
Sept. 20-233
Sept. 21-160
Sept. 22-275
Sept. 23-291
Sept. 24-4
Sept. 25-273
Sept. 26-123
Sept. 27-359
Sept. 28-347
Sept. 29-276
Sept. 30-110
OCTOBER
Oct. 1-38
Oct. 2-143
Oct. 3-84
Oct. 4-193
Oct. 5-145
Oct. 6-311
Oct. 7-321
Oct. 8-132
Oct. 9-171

Oct. 10-358
Oct. 11-93
Oct. 12-259
Oct. 13-10
Oct. 14-364
Oct. 15-172
Oct. 16.52
Oct. 17-224
Oct. 18-258
Oct. 19-319
Oct. 20-324
Oct. 21-73,
Oct. 22-9
Oct. 23-274
Oct. 24-272
Oct. 25-287
Oct. 26-29
Oct. 27-285
Oct. 28-142
Oct. 29-144
Oct. 30-149
Oct. 31-126
NOVEMBER
Nov. 1-47
Nov. 2-187
Nov. 3-158
Nov. 4-251
Nov. 5-63
Nov. 6-19
Nov. 7353
Nov. 8-78
Nov. 9-83
Nov. 10-236
Nov. 11-105
Nov. 12-118
Nov. 13-297
Nov. 14-296
Nov. 15-68
Nov. 16-182
Nov. 17-59
Nov. 18-210
Nov. 19-293
Nov. 20-174
Nov. 21-36

Nov. 22-157
Nov. 23-98
Nov. 24-22
Nov. 25-17
Nov. 26-37
Nov. 27-316
Nov. 28-284
Nov. 29-95
Nov. 30-104
DECEMBER
Dec. 1-115
Dec. 2-211
Dec. 3-71
Dec. 4-209
Dec. 5-43
Dec. 6-166
Dec. 7-138
Dec. 8-113
Dec. 9-300
Dec. 10-196
Dec. 11-350)
Dec. 12-197
Dec. 13-201
Dec. 14-308
Dec. 15-146
Dec. 16-72
Dec. 17-34
Dec. 18-194
Dec. 19-97
Dec. 20.92
Dec. 21-255
Dec. 22-336
Dec. 23-91
Dec. 24-153
Dec. 25-163
Dec. 26-181
Dec. 27-238
Dec. 28-332
Dec. 29-310
Dec. 30-266
Dec. 31-50

Friday, March 22
Dlay Calendar
Educational Media Ctr., Audio-visual:
"To Die Today." Schorling Aud., SEB,
12:15 pm.
Thomas M. Cooley Lectures: N. Mor-
ris, L. Ohlin, M. Rector, G. Sturup, F.
Allen.
Astronomy: 6. Elste, "The Solar Cor-
ona," Mars, the Search Begins, Aud. B,
Angell Hall, 8 pm.
Music School:."Eugene Onegin,"
Mendelssohn, 8 pm.
Dance: "Creative Preserves," Schor-
ling Aud., SEB, 8 pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7460
Fellowships for Master's degree in
Health Care Administration at Whar-
ton School. write Dr. Anthony Kovner,
3641 Locust walk, Univ. of PA, Phila-
delphia, 19174,
Double Master's degree in Library Sci-
ence and Operations Res. in 3 semes-
ters and is summer at Case Western U.
Write Dean, School of Library Science,
Cleveland, Ohio 44106.
Teaching assistantships of $3,000 plus
tuition for students earning MS in
biological sciences at Lowell Tech Inst.,
Mass 01854. Write Chm. of Biol. Se.
Case Western Reserve University of-
fers a program to meet the demand
for computer programmrs in Infor-
mation Science, working in many li-
braries on information retrieval - as
part of a Western degree in library
science. Write the Dean of Lib. St.
T111 MIHIGAN PAI1Y
Volume LXXXIV, Number 136
Friday, March 22, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid aT
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published,
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor. Michigan 48104
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-1
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday
chrougn Saturday morning. Subscrip.
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area ) $6.50 local mail (Miehigan and
Oio1.; $7.00 non-lo'0al mail ;other
states and foreign
s'

"I will continue to work for
a better Ann Arbor"
*Fiscal responsibility
*Improved City services
*Safety of all citizens
*Planned growth
*Parks and recreation programs
*Sound governmental relationships
The Co/burn "Bunch"

RE-ELECT COLBURN/FOURTH WARD/REPUBLICAN /MONDAY, APRIL 1

(Paid Political Advertisement) -

La . I_ _-

ALTERNATE

ENERGY

wind * methane }* water " solar
SOCIAL GODDARD COLLEGE
ECOLOGY SUMMER '74
STUDIES.:
PROGRAM+}

June 3-August 23

15 credits

Feb. 12-185
Feb. 13-356
Feb. 14-235
Feb. 15-315
Feb 16-3

APRIL
April 1-328
April 2-152
April 3-212
April 4-223

HU ING

101.

Do Your Own Seder!!
Didyou ever thinkof doing your
own seder instead of going to'
someone else's seder?
PASSOVER Is APRIL 6
If you want to LEARN how to do PASSOVER
and your own seder in your apartment or
dorm, come to a
PASSOVER SEDER WORKSHOP
SUNDAY, March 24
1 p.m. at HILLEL, 1429 Hill St.

a short quiz
THE ANN ARBOR DEMOCRATIC
PARTY:
A. Supports Rent Control Strongly
B. Opposes Rent Control Strongly
C. Sometimes Supports Rent Control
Half -heartedly
D. Usually Ignores Rent Control
E. All of the Above
F. None of the Above
CORRECT ANSWER: Both E and F
Various Democratic candidates have

1
i
I
I-
I
I
I
i
i

Tenants need a p ar ty
which will take the steps
needed act on their be-
half, not merely mouth
v a g u e and insincere
promises. HRP put rent
control on the ballot and
will fight to make it
work.

An intensive 12 week program in social ecology
and environmental sciences, exploring alternative
technologies, a no-growth economy, organic agri-
culture, urban decentralizatin, the politics of eco-
logy, and the design and construction of experi-
mental models for wind, solar, and methane-pow-
ered energy production.
Goddard is located in a rural Vermont community,
rich in both natural and human resources, in a
state noted for its progressive environmental legis-
lation.
The summer program is directed by MURRAY
BOOKCH IN, author of Post-Scarcity Anarchism
and Limits to the C i t y. Faculty include KARL
HESS, Community Technologies; SAM LOVE, the
Environmental Action Collective; JOHNRTODD and
the N e w Alchemists; WILSON CLARK, energy
-consultant.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
D. Chodorkoff
Social Ecology Program
Goddard College
Plainfield, Vermonit 05667

VY~~~

L

-- - in. y'' a- ______________'_____W_____________7________________

F M
T'. f 2 U"

/

THE ORIGINAL
USICAL COMEDY
28-31
ca y
163-"*

taken all
weeks

these positions in

recent

WE NEED RENT CONTROL AND
ELECTED OFFICIALS WHO WILL
FIGHT FOR TENANTS' RIGHTS
HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY
VQ i a"a alS

I'

"The planning process must reflect citizen priorities, not those of
City Hall officials or the interests of developers. Too much is decided
at closed-door meetings between the planning staff and developers.
Public discussion is needed at the earliest possible stage to prevent
unwanted projects from going too far to be stopped. Our planning
policies should encourage the construction of more low and moder-
..........ni h n a -nnrntives not high-oriced housina for

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