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March 19, 1974 - Image 8

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Michigan Daily, 1974-03-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 19, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday. March 19. 1974

1 1

JUDGE SIRICA RULES

BE

A

APRIL, 1974
PART 1
MARCH 18-24
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Rodin
(Continued from Page 1)
judgments. The report is a simple
and straightforward compilation of
information gathered by the grand
jury and no more."
REPS. PETER Rodino (D-N.J.)
and Edward Hutchinson (R-Mich.)
-the chairman and the senior GOP
member of the House Judiciary
Committee-said they were pleased
at the decision.
"The grand jury report was ob-
viously intended for the committee
and the committee should have it,"
Hutchinson said.
The grand jury had recommend-
ed that the materials it turned over
to Sirica be given to the House, the
judge said, because the evidence
has "a material bearing on mat-
ters within the primary jurisdiction
of the committee in its current in-
quiry."

ogetsp
Sirica said it is up to the com-
mittee to decide whether to accede
to a request by President Nixzn's
lawyers that they be allowed tol
review the report.
Yesterday's opinion was Silca's
last major act as chief judge of
the U.S. District Court for the Dis-1
trict of Columbia. He relinquished
the title at midnight, on the eve
of his 70th birthday, tut will re-
main an active judge.
THE JUDGE HAD to decide two
questions in connection with the
report and a satchel full of evi-
dence that accompanied it: wheth-
er the grand jury had the power
to make such reports and whether
the-court could disclose them and
to what extent.
On the first question, Sirica cited
a number of precedents and said
the court would be unjustified in

Nixon,
denying the grand jury authority
to issue the report.
"The grand jury has obviously
taken care to assure that its report
contains no objectionable features,"
he said.
On point two, Sirica said that the
grand jury recommended "not pub-
lic dissemination, but delivery to
the House Judiciary Committee
with a request that the report be
used with due regard for the con-
stitutional rights of persons under
indictment."
To that he added: "The court be-
lieves that it should presumptively
favor disclosure to those for whom
the matter is a proper concern
and whose need is not disputed
. delivery to the committee is
eminently proper, and indeed, ob-
ligatory."
Because the report is not an in-

report
dictment, Sirica said, "the Presi-
dent would not be left without aj
forum in which to adjudicate any
charges against him that might
employ report materials. The Pres-
ident does not object to release."
IN THE HEARINGS on the re-
port March 6, lawyers for Halde-
man and Ehrlichman said they
feared the material might leak out,
despite committee assurances that
all precautions would be taken.
Sirisa said he could not justify
bottling up the report on such
speculation.}
House Speaker Carl Albert (D-
Okla.) said that "offhand, it seems
to me it was a very good ruling,"
and Majority L e a d e r Thomas
"Tip" O'Neill (D-Mass.) said the
ruling "will help expedite the mat-
ter" before the committee..

Arabs end boycott;
retain high Prices.,

(Continued from Page 1)
May,"* one company official '*re-
ported, due to the time it would
take to resume shipping Arab
crude oil to U.S. refineries.
This may cause the Nixon ad-
ministration some troubles, accord-
ing to administration officials, who
termed the lifting of the embargo
a mixed blessing.
They said it could give the na-
tion a psychological boost while
making it harder for the President
to sell Congress on his plans for
American self-sufficiency in oil.
One oil company executive said:
"We are looking to import more
oil. How much we get and whether
it will be enough to meet demand
is still up in the air."
CONCERNING THE continuation
of the boycott in Europe, Arab
spokespersons said that exports to
West Germany and Italy will also
increase to the pre-embargo level
as they have in recent months to
France, Britain, Belgium and Ja-
pan-all considered friendly coun-
tries.
Yamani made it clear that the

embargo against Holland would re
main in force. He said the position
of Holland and Denmark remained
"unfriendly."
"THERE MUST be a change
similar to what happened with the
rest of the Coimon Market,"
Yamani said. "Now only ,Holland
and Denmark did not ask for the
complete withdrawal of Israel"
from Arab territories occupied in
1967.
The move to end the boycott had
been led by Egypt and Saudi
Arabia in recognition of American
peace efforts in the Mideast.
IN WHAT appeared to be a sig-
nificant split in the Arab view of
the use of the oil weapon, Libya
and Syria opposed lifting the em-
bargo.
Yamani said their opposition was
"a question of timing." He said
all Arab countries had agreed to
the move in principle.
Algerian oil minister Belad Ab-
desselam said Syria and Libya did
not think the proper time had come
to reward the United States.

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ARTISTS ON MARCH 18 AT 8 P.M.

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By DAVID LIEBERMAN circulation in 40 to 50 central cam- The ECTF has been meeting
Do you freeze while studying at pus buildings. since September and is coordinat-
the UGLI and boil attending classes The estimated savings from this ing the energy conservation pro-
in Angell Hall? $1 million four year project will grams within the University.
Are you annoyed at the Univer- offset the cost within six years IN UNIVERSITY Housing the re-
sity's apparent disregard for en- according to Don Wendel, director duction in electrical waste will
ergy conservation, as seen in the of plant operations at the Univer- save about $17,000 this year ac-,
widdly varying temperatures in sity. cording to Associate Director of
University buildings? The proposal was prepared by Housing Claude Orr, who is also
IN AN EFFORT to correct this, Hoyem Associates and approved by a member of the ECTF.
the University Plant Department the University Energy Conservation Sitt hi dimlylit off. in
will take bids this summer for a Task Force (ECTF) last month. tSting in is Aci y-ies Bu ice in
C e n t r a 1 Environmental Control the Student Activities Building, Orr
System (CECS), which will monitor CONSERVATION efforts by the described the two phases of energy
and control the air temperature and ECTF and others at the University saving in the dormitories.
since September have resulted in The. first step, already imple-
savings of five per cent in elec- mented, includes lowering dorm
tricity used and ten per cent in temperatures, reducing the use of
Study m steam used according to Wendel. current light fixtures and eliminat-
But this savings will not be re- ing unnecessary heating of kitchen
flected in the University's utility ovens.
I AL YL bill because of the steady increase The second phase consists of per-
this summer in utility rates. manent changes made in the dorms

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DAILY OFF ICIAL BULLETIN
March 19, 1974 , Extension Service, Engl: Poetry
Day Calendar reading, L. Goldstein, D. Tall, Aud. 3,
Materials, Metallurgical Engineering: MLB, 4:10 pm.
E. T. Turkdogan, "Reflections on Re- Law School: Thomas M. Cooley Le-
search in Pyrometalurgy & Metalurgi- tures, "The ^uture of Imprisonment",
cal Engineering", 3210 E. Eng., 11 am. N. Morris, "Prison as a Coerced Cure,"
School of Music: Trumpet Student 100 HH, 4:15 pm.
Recital, Recital Hall, 12:30 pm. Psych Film Series: "Up is Down",
Mat: J. Serrin, Univ. of Minn., "Ax- "Eye of the Storm", "Reggie", "The
iois of .Classical Mechanics", 3212 AH, Orange and the Green", Aud. 3, MLB,
3 pm. 4:30 pm.
Arch & Design: M. Flinn, "The Law School Student Senate: Seminar,
Sense of Greece and Rome", "Odyssey j"The Rights of the Accused", 120 HH,
in Imagination", Arch. Aud., 3:30 pm. 7:30.
Kelsey Museum, Anthro. Museum, WUOM: Symposium 74, Discussion.
History: W. McDonald, Univ. of Minn., Student Financial Aid Programs, 8pm
"Excavations at Messenian Nichoria: Music School: Baroque Trio, Rose-
Cross Disciplinary Contributions to mary Russell, mezzo-sopran, Rack-
Greek Archaeology", Aud. A, AH, 4 pm. ham Aud., 8 pm. J. Salistian, saxo-
P & A: Seminar, A. Brailford, "The- phone, Recital Hall, 8 pm.
ory of the Interaction of Dislocations Romance Lang., Classical Studies: C.
with Electrons & Photons, Randall witke "Alienation in the World of
Lab, Rm. 2038, 4 pe. Senecan Tragedy", Lec. Rm. 1, MLB, 8
Seminor, v. Barger, Univ. of Wisc., pm.
"Phenomenology of Deep Inelastic Neu- Psychiatry: "T.S. Eliot and the Waste
trino Scattering," Colloq. Rm., 4 pm; Land: An Instance of Creativity Fol-
Aerospace: L. Friedman, "The Jup- lowing a Psychiatric Ilness, CPH, 8
iter-Orbiter Mission", Aero. Sp. Eng., pm, H. T. Trosman.
4 pm. Residential College: Astronomical
Fm F Festival. E. Quad. Ad., 9 pm.
Summer Placement
/ 3200 SAB, Phone 763-4117
/' "rCamp Maplehurset, MI Coed. Inter-
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Fri., 3/22, 9:30 to s. general & special.
SALE THRU MARCH 24th ists positions open.
open nightly till 10 p.m., Camp Sea Gull, MI Coed. Interview
Sun. 11 -6 Tues. 3/26, 1 to 5. Guitar, waterfront,
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Join The Daily Ad Staff
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Private instruction in all styles. Beginners can take
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(Open 9:30-9 daily; Sat, till 6:00)
-nstrument Rentals Available at Student Rates-
FILMS
NOON at International Center
W. Quad, Madison St.
10:00 p.m. at Ecumenical Campus Center
921 Church St.
March 20-
SAD SONG OF YELLOW SKIN
Absorbing and disturbing documentary which focuses on three
young Americans living in Saigon. One lives with a group of
Vietnamese child-men who work as shoe. shine boys; another, a
Journalist, tours a barbaric neighborhood called "The Grave
yard"; the third is John Steinbeck, Jr., who lives on on incred-
ible island of Peace in the Mekong Delta. Not a film about
death in war, but about what little life there is left with war
all around.
March 27 -
BUT WHAT IF THE DREAM

COMES TRUE ?
Incisive documentary about an upper-class family whose
dreams of affluence and social insularity in exclusive Birming-
ham, Michigan are realized. What they have achieved and how
they Ive. A revealing study of one segment of an American
lifestvle

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The Peace Corps. VISTA. University Year for
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