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March 19, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-19

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Tuesday, March 19, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Tuesday, March 19, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

_ _

--

THE WINNERS

Creative Preserves' moves
dance goodies onto stage

Provocatire,

but judges

bomb-out

By MARNIE HEYN
On Friday and Sunday, March
22 and 24, Andrea Verier and
Ellen Bogart will present their
masters degree recital Cultural
Preserves at 8 p.m. in Schorling
Auditorium in the School of Edu-
cation.
The first number, designed by
Ellen Bogart, is called "A
Bushel of Peaches, or, Dinner
with Daddy." The musical aspect
of this piece will include Andrea
Katz singing "My Heart Belongs
to Daddy" over a tape of an
early recording of the same song.
Thematically, the dance relates
to "children, doctors, daddies,
and cowgirls," and other anoma-
lies of father-daughter relation-
ships, arranged in onion-like lay-
ers, all in good oedipal fun.
Ellen also choreographed the
second piece, entitled "Croise
Moteau." Ellen talked about the
process of designing this dance:
"Croise Moteau is a jigsaw
puzzle with several possible com-
positions, so it's necessarily rough
around the, edges. It explores
spatial relationships, measuring,
fitting. We worked mostly by im-
provising on set material. For in-
stance, I made assignments like
'relate to the music,' 'explore
that rhythm,' or 'follow another
dancer without using your eyes.,
Ultimately, five of the 16-measure
phrases used in the piece were
created by the dancers."
In music and in dance style,
"Croise Btea" is improvisa-
tional jazz, utilizing call'response
form and layers of sound and
image that trade off quality and
rhythm. Spontaneous riffs add
humor to this sensuous, intri-
cately-worked dance. For the
most part, the musicians, Nelson
Bogart with guitars and trumpet
and David Schreiner with bas-
soon and synthesizer, lead and
initiate movement on the part of
the dancers.
"To See or Not To See" is the
third and final dance of the re-
cital. Choreographed by Andrea
Verier, this piece features The
Run-The-Gamut Trio, Theodore
Baskinj, oboist for the Detroit
Symphony, Joseph Striplin, vio-
linist for the Detroit Symphony,
and Michael Pilopian, pianist
from EMU. They will be playing
Bach, Poulenc, Dr. John the
Night-Tripper, Richard Rogers,
and Telemann while wearing red
gym shorts and red tennis shoes
and singing along on the chorus.
'To See" is delightful, com-
bining neck-biting satire and
serious exploration of new tech-
niques and attitudes. Says An-
drea: "When I started this piece,
what I had in my head was a
series of tableaux, which grew
and shrank as the whole fell
together. I guess my 'message'
was satirizing pretension, but I
wanted to try some new things,
to attempt to organize chaos."
She continued: "When we start-
ed choreographing my solo, I
asked each person to take a sec-
tion and elaborate on it, pare it
down, embellish it. I think finally
that it talks about illusions and
realities, the ones we share and
those we can't. It's an exercise
in symbols and geometry."
"To See or Not To See" begins
as each dancer comes down the
aisle attired in one symbolic
garment (over a jumpsuit). They
move into vaudevillian parodies
of dances from the minuet to
quad-mixer boogie to an even-
ing's walk with a quasi-dog,
tumble, dance blindfolded, and
finally fall together and apart
off the front of the stage onto
mats.
Throughout this piece there is
a sense of real bodies, of weight,
of the limitations of human limbs.
There are no illusory leaps
through space: therefore, anyone
with an interest in movement is

implicitly able to explore the
same frontiers-even from their
seats.

By BRUCE SHLAIN
Well, I should have known it.
After referring to Scream Bloody
Mary as "the hiatus in the
realm of vulgarity" (a phrase
used to avoid saying "trite bull-
shit"), I should have known
that it would cop the $750 first
prize in the Festival.
Needless to say, after seeing
the film again, my first impres-
sion remains that of overwhelm-
ing distate. It was some consola-
tion hearing the sighs of disgust
all around me in the audience.
But this is not a meditation on
where the judges' respective
heads are at, for that would re-
quire prolonged psychiatric
study, and one would probably
not find anything in there any-
way.
Still, I can imagine the dilm-
ma presented in trying to award1
a major prize in this year's fes-
tival, for although there were a
~ few fine offerings, nothing re-
sembling a "major new film" ap-
peared as in previous years.
There was, of course, George
Manupelli's Portraits, Self Por-
traits and Still Lives 1972-73 with
Special Reference to the Assas-
sination of President John F.
Kennedy or This is not Aufweid-
ersehen this is Goodbye.
Manupelli's 45-minute f i in
which was not entered in the
competition was a series of flow-
ing visual manipulations cen=iered
vaguely around the motorcaae
ride through Dallas. Shots of col-
orful Rolls Royces slowly winding
through county scenes rad la-
is ;fn er footage of accidentridden r,:as
ness races underscored the imag
of the Kennedy Assassination,
the tragedy that presided de-
licately at the fringes of he
film's smoldering anguisn and
resignation.
Although many of the images
were highly sexual, contrasting
the childish innocence of youn;
girls who were forever undress-
7V 1
expected
birds Three Dog Night re-entered
its, all and finished with some spring-
oh and pretty material from their new
Fourth album. They succumbed to
crowd demands for an encore by
peared, rocking out "Joy to the World."
ith hair To the detriment of the musi-
d pink cal talent onstage, the concert
50s re- suffered from exceedingly bad
lves as sound balance. The sound must
did a be loud enough for the $2.50 peo-
ple, but sound levels were so
heroes high that words and notes be-
leaving came throbbing, ear-ringing
at their white noise, only comfortably
got all listened to with fingers implant-
,ed. ed in both ears. The din was
hanged tolerable for a worthy cause,
distage however, and a temporary loss
did an of hearing was perhaps accept-
,ecially
,henhe able in exchange for a concert
thenk t l b h
ntoo that was a little better than any-

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ing in the film, none of them
dealt with male-female relations,
most of them isolated, derached. ,
Such as the scene in which a
woman masturbates with a tele-
vision between her legs t h a t
shows the Watergate hearings,
strumming the face of Ehrlich-
man as she retreats into her
body.
Other comnientary on the me-
dia creations that pretend ,o)
"speak for us" was made silent
footage of Jagger performing ap-
peared, strangely empty in the
context employed by Manupelli.
Another scene was of a woman
sitting bored in a wicker chair,
while the television next to her
showed the eternal flame in black
and white, flickering as a re-
minder of her ennui.
Portraits ends with a harness
race in which a rider is thrown.
the horse bolting across tWe in-
ish line out of control -- the
tragic price of freedom, t h e
blind forces of history, these
were the intangibles that the di-
rector played upon with an atti-

tude imbued with humorous re-
straint. It was a fiac film.
I was glad to see Curt Mc-
Dowell's Boggy Depot win an
award, since it was the funniest
film in the festival, an off-key
musical parody of West S i d e
Story. It featured the M e a n
Brothers, marked by McDowell's
well-develodep sense for perver-
sion, who hypnotize their awk-
ward housemate to fall in love.
Egg Nog was also amusing,
with its apocalyptic measage
about the egg nog that could fail
from the sky at any moment to
annihilate us. I like films with a
message.
Quarry, by Richard Rodgers,
and Shoeshine, the classic sub-
way scene, were well-deserving
winners. So was And I Don't
Mean Maybe, an ambiguously
homosexual encounter with vio-
lence in the desert by Mark Grif-
fiths.
Antonia, the fine documentary
directed by J u d i t h Godmilow
and Judy Collins (yes, the sing-
er) on an aging woman conduc-

tor, did not win. I guess they
forgot to hold the camera up-
side down in that one, so it would
be noticed. It was a portrait of
the aging symphony conductor
Antonia Broca, a film which rais-
ed itself above the level of pure
nostalgia because af the woman's
obvious vitality as a creative ar-
tist who is still suffering from
the music world's reluctance to
grant her the opportunity to play
her instrument: a symphony.
In recounting her struggles to
gain a place in the conducting
world, Antonia displays a com-
bination of determination and

warmth and humor that carry the
film easily. And her facial ex-
pression is amazingly evocative
of her life dedicated to music.
To be sure, in making any docu-
mentary portrait, the choice of
subject matter, the person is all-
important, and 70-year-aid female
conductors you just da not meet
on the street everyday. T h e
Woman's Question, that of An-
tonia's stifled career in. the face
of sexist discrimination, is Atud-
ed to without propagandizing, and
therein lies the real emotional
strength of the portrait. I; would
have been a crime if the person-
ality of this amazing woman had
been drowned out in a chorus of
epithets screaming for liberation.
Instead the focus is on the
woman, and the political over-
tones of her struggle arc allowed
to emerge naturally out of the
story.

Changing Jewish Life Styles
IMPLICATIONS FOR
JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE
A Talk by GERALD BUBIS
Director, School of Jewish Communal Service
Hebrew Union College, Los Angeles, California
WED., MARCH 20--4 p.m.
SOCIAL WORK CENTER BLDG., 1015 E. Huron
2 p.m.-WED., MARCH 20
at H I LLEL-1429 Hill
a meeting with people interested in Jewish Com-
munal Service
ALL PROGRAMS SPONSORED BY U of M - H ILLEL

"To see or not to see"

Three

Dog

FIFTH4 FI2IiIE.EE.
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR
761-9700

Better than

I.

By BETH NISSEN
It was definitely a Three Dog
Night audience at the Chambers
.Brothers/Three Dog Night con-
cert in Crisler Arena last Friday
night. The concert was sponsor-
ed by the Phi Delta Sigma Fra-
ternity, Delta Ro chapter, all
proceeds going to the March of
Dimes.
The Chambers Brothers saun-
tered on stage half an hour late
and tried with limited success to
get the lukewarm audience to
sing, clap and boogie along.
During an audience participa-
tion number, they asked the au-
dience to clap in unison, thus
giving their their biggest round
of applause of the evening.
The Brothers didn't perform
any of their better knowns, but
devoted half their set to unin-
spired variations on the Motown
themes of other artists. The ma-
jority of their songs were mushy,
hearts-and flowers sobs, dripping
with the pangs and twangs of
love. Their entire performance
was like a musical Dear Abby
with electric guitar and drums.
After the normal rash of fris-
bee throwing and scattered
match-lighting in the interim fol-
lowing the Brothers' departure
from stage, Three Dog Night ap-
peared. They satisfied the cheer-
ing audience with several of
their best, including "Liar",
"Shambala," "One", and "Mom-
ma Told Me Not to Come." After
four songs, Three Dog Night
turned the stage over to the
Wizard, a musical Merlin be-
robed in black satin, who played
a rather disjointed tape of com-
puterized moog, calliope hoots

and sounds like neurotic
falling into bottomless p
punctuated with visible b
aah flashes, flares and
of July puffs of smoke.
Three Dog Night reapl
greasing onto the stage wi
slicked back, spats an
suits to do an amusingc
vne. Referring to themse
The Vomitones the grout
funny, quick-paced twent
utes as burger-and-fries
of cruisin' and croonin',
the audience to marvel a
versatility, and how they
their hair so neatly slick
As Three Dog Night c
into moreicontemporary
clothes, their drummer
imaginative s o 1 o, esl
pleasing the audience w
tossed them his sticks a
to his drums jungle style.

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05
Hor or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
Jelly--$1.40
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.90

Specials This Week
Beef Stroganoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Goulash
Egg Rolls
Home-made Soups
(Beef, Barley, Clam Chowder,
etc.)
Chili, Vegetable Tempura
(served after 2 p.m.)
Fried Rice with Sausages
and Vegetables

"One of the year's ten best films."
-L.A. Times
"Laced with laughter. One of the
best movies of the year."
-Gene Sholit, NBC-TV
"A funny, funny movie."
-Metro Media TV
TALL BLOND MAN
WITH ONE
BLACK SHOE
rated PG
SHOWTIMES:
Mon.-Thurs., 7:30 and 9:15 p.m.
Fri., Sat., Sun., 6:45, 8:30 and 10:15 p.m.

('
K:'
p;.
.
:k
'?r"
,4

.x tV a

one expected.

FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

I

. niV,

UI

vm . , i 1 PW6.

S

4A

Tues.-Fri.: 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat.-Sun.: 9:00 a.m-9 pm
1313 SO UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

s.

AT LAS1TIFSCIFEIP
Now in paperback-the complete screenplay of the most dis-
cussed and probably the most shocking movie ever made.
Pauline Kael proclaims it "the film that has made the strong-
est impression on me in almost 20 years of reviewing."
Norman Mailer calls it "a failure worth a hundred films like
The Godfather." See for yourself.
With photographs from the film
and critical essays by Pauline Kael
and Norman Mailer

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290
Open 12:45. Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 P.M.
3 Academy Award
Nominations incl.
BEST ACTOR
JACK NICHOLSON
"THE LAST
DETAIL"1i

College Young Democrats
MASS MEETING
TUESDAY-March 19-7 p.m.
Michigan League, Room E
If college students continue to shun the call of political action,
then we have but ourselves to fault for the many crises our
nation faces today.

PAUL NEWMAN
& ROBERT REDFORD in
"THE
STING" (PG)
WINNER OF 10
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS!
OPEN DAILY 1 P.M.
Showso1 a :30,4:00, 6:30
& 9P.M.

x

DID YOU KNOW?

r

m

I

tuesday night!
BEER NIGHT!!!

BERNARDO
BERTOLUCCI'S
'~go in..
9naxis

........ ------------------- --- -- -------

I

Board Exam Tutoring
Stanley H. Kaplan
Educational Center
Classes now being formed for the upcoming
MCAT LSAT

I

I

PITCHER of COLD
Schiltz BEER-
(64 ounces)
HALF-PRICE!

OPEN TODAY 6:45
SHOWS AT 7 and 9 only
Wed, at 1 -3-5-7-9 !~
R obertN
Redford
a"jeremiah
John on"
A C).fl%. C r YMI rU nA

1 .; unvesiy

5

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U U K

; : :;

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'3 S

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