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March 17, 1974 - Image 10

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Michigan Daily, 1974-03-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 17, 1974

THE MICHIGAN L)AILY Sunday, March 17, 1974

m e
(Continued from Page 1)
>re at 66-all. Wayman Britt con
rted a one-and-one to put Mich-
an back on top, but that was the
t lead the Wolverines were to

endcl
ball was off to Grote
t- break.

0 f

rea

BY GEORGE!
George Hastings --o

on a fast,

peared to work, as Warrior guard However, Worrell had tied up
Lloyd Walton got himself hopeless- Marquette's Rick Campbell in the
ly tied up in the corner. But the;scramble for the loose ball, and a
official seemed to believe that| jump ball was called. Michigan

Marcus ,Washington broke loose
in the lane for an easy la up and
the score was tied again. Coming
down the court, Grote was called
for charging, and the Warriors had
the ball. They soon had the lead,
as Ellis canned a 10-footer with
2:25 to go.
Michigan came back, only to see'
Britt miss a long shot and Ellis
gather the rebound. Marquette
chose to eat up the clock with a
stall, a strategy that worked until
Washington decided to shoot. He
missed, Russell rebounded, and the

BUT INSTEAD of an easy bucket,
Grote had the ball clubbed out of
his hands. Marquette took it back,
and Britt avenged his team by
stealing the ball back. But his long
pass to Grote was broken up by
Dave Delsman and the Wolverines
had lost two scoring chances.
Trying to guard Delsman, Grote
picked up his fifth personal and
Delsman a pair of free throws to
move the Warriors ahead 72-68.
Michigan hurried back, and Russell
scored on an assist from Lionel
Worrell to move Michigan within
two with 25 seconds to go.
The (desperate Wolverines then
threw a press at Marquette. It ap-

Worrell was fouling him. soWal-

ii

ton was sent to the line.
HE MISSED, and Kupec snared
the rebound. During the ensuing
time out, Orr discussed his strategy,
for the last shot. According to Pus-
sell, "The last shot was for who-
ever was open. Whoever had the;
elhn- azn,.l +ot- ,t "1

won it, with Johnson receiving the
tip, but too much time had elapsed.
A desperate Russell shot missed,
and the season was over.
Johnny Orr had the right thought
for a game like this. "I told my
players before the game, 'if you
win this one, it will be great, but
if you can't, you can't.' This defeat

The Cinderella season.

shot would take it. will be hard for them to take for
But McGuire was also thiaking a while, but in a few days they'll
at this crucial point in time. The think back on the good points of
Warriors came out in a box and the season.
one, with Ed Daniels fallowing "We were 22-5, Big Ten co-chain-
Campy around. There was no open pions, and we went as far as we
shot. Russell took a 20-footer with could in the tournament. They
12 seconds to go, and missed badly. can't take that away from us."

. . .

No joy in Mudville

.ur c

Ellis
Taturn
Washington
Daniels
Campbell
Delsman
Homan
Team
Totals

MARQUETTE
FG FT
4-10 0-0
6-10 1-2
6-10 3_4
4-8 0-2
7-16 3-5
0-0 0-0
1-1 1-1
0-0 4.4
1-4 2-2

R
7
2
10
5
2
0
0
1
7
3
37

F TP,
5 8t
4 13 1
2 151
2 8l
3 17!
0 0
2 3
1 4'
2 4:
21 72j

MICHIGAN
FG FT
Johnson 4-8 0-0
Grote 5-13 5-6
Kupec 3-10 6-8
Britt 5.15 2-2
Russell 7-18 7-9
Worrell 0-0 2-2
Team
Totals 22-64 22-27
Technical fouls: McGuire 2
Score by halfs:
Marquette
MICHIGAN
Attendance: 14,600

R
1
3
7
9
14
2
4
40
1
37
39

F'
1
5
3
4
3
2

TP
8
15
12
12
21
2

18 70
2- T
35-72
31-70

29-59 14-20

r--

I

I, r-

E

heads or tales
--_ _ _ _ _ arc Feldman -
The final seconds ..
... a classic tragedy
TUSCALOOSA, Ala.-"I wouldn't question any of my players
if they shot from the opposite free throw line after the things
they've done for me," said a solemn but upright Michigan coach
Johnny Orr to the assembled press after his Wolverines had
absorbed a stunning, pulse-pounding 72-70 loss at the hands of
Mid-East champion Marquette here yesterday afternoon.
Orr, whose chargers finished with the third best record in
Michigan basketball history with twenty-two wins and five
losses, was naturally referring to the shots thrown up by his
tremendous forward Campy Russell, in the waning moments of
this bitterly disappointing contest.
The Wolverines who had always found somebody to play
Don Quixote in the closing moments of game, after tight game
throughout this season, just didn't have it again in those excruciat-
ing last seconds yesterday. But in the final analysis, with the
exception of those ill-fated attempts, Michigan did little wrong
in the pinch.
Following four lead changes in three ties in the second half
of this classic defensive struggle, Warrior freshman Bo Ellis
gave his team the lead, 70-68, with 2:25 remaining in the game.
With the pressure and intensity of the battle mounting with each
passing second, Wayman Britt came down and missed from the
outside, but Marquette's Marcus Washington returned the favor.
Britt got his hands on the ball and drove towards the Warrior
hoop. Amid a mass of jumping, straining bodies surrounding the
Michigan freshman, Warrior Earl Tatum managed to block
Grote's shot without touching Steve. The referees, at least, were
of that opinion but the garbage pelting Tuscaloosa natives thought
otherwise. That's beside the point and Marquette had the ball.
KRAFTY WARRIOR WIZARD Al McGuire called for time with
1:33 to go and shortly afterwards an incredible series of events
transpired. Within a couple of breathless seconds, Britt tore the
ball away from Tatum with the ferocity of Dick Butkus after a
loose pigskin and just as ferociously, Lloyd Walton pilfered it
back after a Britt pass up court.
Following a time out, the Warriors worked it around for
awhile until Grote fouled Rick Delsman 45 seconds from the end.
Delsman made the free tosses for the first points by either team
in one minute and forty seconds giving Marquette a 72-68 ad-
vantage.
Commonly, the Wolverines came down the floor and Lionel
Worrell hit Campy underneath for an easy two-pointer. Michigan,
doing exactly what it should have in this situation, attempted to
'surround Walton in the right corner and seemed 'to have done
so until Worrell was inexplicably called for the foul.
Walton gave Michigan a temporary reprive by missing the
first of the one-and-one and Russell cleared the boards to Joe
Johnson. The Wolverines met on the sidelines with 18 seconds
left to presumably set up a play.
Michigan, which had trouble running its normal offense all
afternoon, tried to jam it into Kupec but he didn't have the shot.
Finally the Wolverines got the ball to Russell who threw up a
twenty-foot air ball. Worrell managed to fight Rick Campbell to
a draw on the offensive boards and Leapin' Lionel controlled the
subsequent jump ball.
Campy ended up with it again and launched another off
balance shot with three ticks left on the clock, but as the ball
fell away from the hoop no Wolverine was there to perform
another miracle, and Marquette, not Michigan was in the Final
Four.
DESPITE NO PRESEASON or even seasonal aclaim, the
Wolverines had advanced to the Elite Eight of the NCAA
Tournament and to the finals of its toughest Region the Mid-East.
Overcoming adversity, little fan support, and a rugged schedule,
Michigan won 22 games, including those this week, over teams in
the top ten far away from home.
Losing to a third member of that top ten yesterday in
Marquette, is nothing to be ashamed of, especially when one
considers that McGuire has taken his Warriors to tournaments
for eight straight years and lost just thirty-six games in that
span.
The Warriors simply played the better game yesterday and
with a little luck Michigan might have won anyway. However,
Marquette rose to the occasion when superlative Maurice Lucas
fouled out with eight minutes to go, and the Warriors down by
four, yet emerged victorious. Marquette will represent the Mid-
East very well against Kansas in next week's semi-final in
Greensboro.
Tnr., a thn ai]ad Anm. r ofh en. storv of the

AP Photo
WAYMAN BRITT DRIVES for two of his twelve points against
Marquette's Maurice Lucas, in the first half of yesterday's game.
The 6-2 sophomore from Flint also contributed nine rebounds to the
losing cause. Lucas, held to only eight points, fouled out during the
last few minutes of the Marquette victory on a questionable call.
Purdue overthrows
Tar Hteels, o82=71

... comes to an end
TUSCALOOSA
sOMETHERE ALONG the line, somebody must have screwed
up the script because yesterday afternoon at the University of
Alabama Memorial Coliseum the glass slipper simply would not
go onto Cinderella's foot.
It seemed before the game that everything was there. This
bunch of Michigan Wolverines had shocked everybody by tying
for the Big Ten title and within 72 hours they had knocked off
the two giants of the midwest, Indiana and Notre Dame, defying
all predictions.
The Wolverines' underdog roll and gutty play had cap-
tured the imagination of most of the fans in Tuscaloosa. On
the other hand, coach Al McGuire and the Marquette War-
riors had been cast in the roll of the villain after their rough
house and tainted win over sectional favorite Vanderbilt
Thursday night.
It all added up to a crowd solidly behind Michigan, and to
rooters who had followed the Wolverines throughout their
miraculous season it seemed that it would not, could not end
here. Down even to the last wild shot by Campy Russell, it was
hard to believe that anything could stop Michigan from getting
to Greensboro for the NCAA finals.
But alas, somebody somewhere yesterday forgot who the
good guys were, and the Warriors stole away the Wolverines'
miracle. And it was a very tricky bit of strategy by the biggest
bad guy of them all, McGuire, that very easily may have been
the difference.
McGuire's great strategy?
As the first half entered its final minutes, Michigan had
just jumped out to their biggest lead of the game, 39-31, with
some thanks to a technical foul called on McGuire only seconds
before. At that point, Michigan's Steve .Grote fouled the War-
riors' Jerry Holman. If Homan converted the one-on-one, the
Wolverines would get the ball out of bounds, and probably
elect to play for the last shot.
Instead, McGuire took advantage of one of the weirder
rules in college basketball to turn the game right around.
As the referees marched past the Marquette bench on their
way to give Homan his shots, McGuire surprisingly stood
up and did something to get another technical.
Under the rule, that meant that after Homan took his shots
and Michigan shot the technical, there would be a jump ball
instead of Michigan getting the ball out of bounds. It appeared
to be a good strategic move, since as McGuire himself later
admitted having tjat shot and getting the ball off the jump was
more valuable to Marquette than the foul shot would be for
Michigan.
The ploy worked beautifully. Not only did Russell miss the
technical shot and Homan make both ends of the one-on-one,
but Bo Ellis won the ensuing tap from Campy and Marquette
converted it into another basket.
Then a Michigan turnover allowed the Warriors to hit a
pair of free throws as the half ended, and suddenly instead
of a nice cushion the Wolverines took only a two point lead
into the locker room. The strategic technical had not only
enabled Marquette to get the ball back, but it had taken away
the momentum the Wolverines had going and allowed the
Warriors to start the second half not having to play catch up.
McGuire, a self admitted con man, denied after the game
that his technical was taken on purpose, but in the Michigan
locker room his antics were viewed as being very purposeful
and very smart tactics.
Russell acknowledged that the Michigan momentum had been
disrupted at that point. "McGuire broke up the tempo of our
game," he explained. "He did it with his pattern and also that
intentional technical."
Final minute decisive
But of course, while the technical and the effect it had on
the game was very important, it certainly did not by itself doom
Michigan to end its season yesterday. The game could have
gone either way in the final minute, regardless of anything in
the whole world Johnny Orr or Al McGuire might have done.
As it happened, the crucial plays and the close calls in the
closing seconds simply went with Marquette instead of Michigan.
McGuire commented after the game on how narrow the
line that separated victory and defeat in the game really
was. "You know," he said, "in so many tournament games
like these it always comes down to whether the last shot
goes in or not. I could just have easily lost the game out
there with the same Mickey Mouse strategy. We were just
fortunate out there, but it could easilyhave been Michigan."
It was great irony that Marquette should have knocked off
Michigan in such fashion. The Wolverines have lived off the
final five minutes of their games this year, and have always
seemed to come up with the winning effort when the chips were
down.
On the other hand, Marquette seems to go to the NCAA
regional every year and come up with some way to blow it.
McGuire noted that fact when he addressed the booing crowd

over the public address system after the game: "Let's get
something straight," he crowed, "I've been to six straight
NCAA's and I've lost five of them and I never cried like a baby."
But yesterday was just not the Wolverines' day, and it was
the Warriors'. Russell had two attempts at sending the game
into overtime in the last ten seconds, and usually that would
be a pretty good chance for Michigan. But the shots wouldn't
go down and the great effort by Marquette was rewarded with
victory.
The Michigan coaches and players, however, have nothing
to be ashamed of. Against fantastic odds they came up with
one of the greatest seasons in Michigan basketball history, and
rolled up a 22-5 record that seemed back in October as far out
of reach as the planet Pluto. They delighted a lot of basketball
fans, including this one. The 1973-74 Michigan basketball season
will be long remembered.
ATTENTION
STREAKERS
T 5O DISCOUNT
To Any Person Who Streaks Into 4
CENTICORE to Buy a Book'* Be- I

YEAR SCHOLARSHIPS FOR JUDAIC
STUDIES IN ISRAEL AVAILABLE
Students from 18 thru 25 interested in preparing for
Hebrew teaching and/or youth community work,
may advance their Judaic knowledge, at the
famed Hayim Greenberg College in Jerusalern.
Generous scholarships available foryear's curriculum
that includes: Hebrew Language and Literature,
Jewish History, Bible, Pedagogy, and related courses.
Year includes kibbutz work period and touring Israel.
For further information write or call:
DEPT.OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE-WZO-AMERICAN SECTION
515 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022 - (212) PL 2-0600 Ext. 385
The Poet O gsellj
,5aift Patwck'4 jbj Jte
APPETIZRS
BRITISH ISLES CLAM CHOWDER .......... 95c
ONION SOUP AU GRATIN ....... . ..... 95c
DINNERS
CORNED BEEF AND CABBAGE..........$3.95
Braised carrots, Irish parsley potatoes, and Kelly Green
asparagus or Dublin sweet peas.
KNACKWURST AND SAUERKRAUT .......3.45
Irish parsley potatoes.
BRAISED SHORT RIBS ............ ..... 3.95
Irish parsley potatoes, braised carrots, and Kelly Green asparagus
or Dublin sweet peas.
ROAST LEG OF SPRING LAMB ...........5.95
Mint sauce, Irish parsley potatoes, and Kelly Green aspar-
agus or Dublin swee.t peas.
STEAKS UPON REQUEST
Above Pretz O'Bell dinners include: Shamrock Salad
Choice of Dressing
Rye Bread and Creamery Butter
DESSERTS
CREME DE MENTHEEPARFAIT.............$ .85
LIME SHERBET .45
WITH CHAMPAGNE ..................1.50
CHOCOLATE MINT PARFAIT ......... .....1.00
SPIRIT OF SAINT PAT'S
*GREEN BEER .......... ......... Glass $ .50
Stein' .65
Pitcher 2.25
*1 c/glass, 2c/stein and 5c/pitcher will be contributed to The
Muscular Dystrophy Association by the Pretz O'Bell.
Avoid Another Shortage!
1974 MICHIGANENSIANS
are in short supply
Dont wait until April
to buy yearbooks,. .
It may be too late!
ONLY 500 COPIES LEFT
Order Now at Student Publications Building, 420
Maynard or send this order:
MICH IGANENSIAN
Enclosed is a check or money order for $8 to cover the cost of one
1974 Michiganensian. Check here if you would like the book mailed
and enclose $1 to cover mailing expense.
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if you have paid to have the book mailed, please specify
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The University of Michigan
CENTER FOR SOUTH & SOUTHEAST ASIAN STUDIES
ANNOUNCES
A SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIAN
MINI - COURSE
THE EVOLUTION OF A MTH
The Ramayana in Southern Asia
(Division No 495, Course No. 418)
MARCH 19- APRIL 4
The purpose of this course will be to explore what
happens as a classic story travels from region to re-
gion and from medium to medium. How do symbolic
forms evolve? How does a story keep its relevance
thrugh history? How does medium shape content?
Scholars from several fields-art, music, literature,
philosophy, linguistics, and history-have been ask-
ed to dicuss the great Sanskrit clasic, the Rama-
yana, giving special attention to these questions.

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Jerry Nichols
scored three straight baskets in
a minute and a half and finish-
ed with 22"points as Purdue ral-
lied in the second half to upset
seventh - ranked North Carolina
82-71 in the first round of the
NIT yesterday.
Down 42-36 at the intermission,
Purdue's Boilermakers rallied
in the second half, out-scoring
the top-seeded Tar Heels 29-10
in the first 10 minutes.
The Tar Heels hampered by
cold shooting had 33 turnovers in
the first 18 minutes of the game
as well.
Frank Kendrick finished with
19 points for Purdue, 18-8, while
Davis had 18 for North Caro-
lina, 22-6, and Bobby Jones had
13.
*" * *
Jayhawks skalp
TULSA, Okla. - Reserve for-
ward Tommy Smith hit two
clutch field goals in the last 28
seconds of overtime and dis-
ciplined Kansas rallied to de-
feat Oral Roberts University 93-
90 and win the NCAA Midwest
Regional basketball champion-
shin yesterdav.
The Big Eight-champion Jay
Hawks, who will face Marquette
in the semifinals Saturday in
Greensboro came back from a
nine-point deficit in the final
four minutes on the outside
shooting of Roger Morningstar
and Dale Greenlee. Suner sonho-
more Rick Sttle got the basket
that tied the game 81-81 and
sent it into overtime.
Brrainx overkill
TUCSON - UCLA'S Bruins
rode the 27-point shooting of All-
American Keith Wilkes to an
overwhelming 83-60 victory over
the University of San Francisco
yesterday, winning the NCAA
Western regional title.
While Wilkes, a 6-7 senior, was
the big gmnner, his All-American
r'inning mote. Bill Walton, at 6-
11, kent the Bruins in command
on defense.
San Francisco. led by Kevin

The Bruins will meet North
Carolina State at Greensboro,
N. C., Saturday in the national
semi-finals.
Wolf perch howls
RALEIGH, N.C.-A grim Tom-
my Burleson scored 21 of his 26
points after All-American team-
mate David Thompson was lost
with an early injury and led
North Carolina State, the nation's
No. 1 basketball team, to a 100-
72 rout of Pittsburgh yesterday
for the NCAA Eastern Regional
title.
Thompson, who crashed to the
floor with 10:1i7 left in the first
half, was taken to a hospital
where x-rays later revealed no
serious injury.
Burleson hit nine of 19 shots
and collected 12 rebounds. Monte
Towe scored 19 points and dished
out six assists and Moe Rivers
contributed 17 points.
Pittsburgh's second, team All-
American Bill Knight scored 19
points to lead his team.
Michigan
Rugo--gers ace
Dayton club
The Michigan Rugby Football
Club opened the spring season with
an impressive 34-0 bruiser over
the University of Dayton Flyers on
Ferry Field yesterday.
The Blue scored early when
speedster Jordan Weinstein turned
the corner on a good back move-
ment for a try in the corner. Ex-
periencing difficulties in moving
the ball out of its end of the field
in the first half, Michigan was un-
able to score again until the clos-
ing moments when Gordy Carruth
scored on a long throw in off the
lineout and Cleland Child scored
the first of his two trys on a blind
side break.
The second half was dominated

Each class
Thursdays,

will run from 3:00-5:30, Tuesdays and
at 306 Burton Memorial Tower.

- PARTICIPATING FACULTY -
ALTON L. BECKER - Linguistics
MADHAV DESHPANDE -Linguistics
LUIS GOMEZ - Buddhist Studies
SATENDRA KHANNA - English
CHANDRA AGRAWAL - Humanities
WALTER SPINK - Art History
NAZIR JAIRAZBHOY - Indian Music,
Univ. of Windsor
WILLIAM GEDNEY - Linguistics
HIRAM WOODWARD - History of Art
WILLIAM MALM - Musicoloay

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