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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 16, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MIC141GAN DAILY

Saturday, March 16, 1974

SMORGASBORD
SATURDAYS 6-9 p.m.
AND
WEDNESDAYS 6-9 p.m.
$3.95
1. cold vichysoisse
2. coq au vin
3. potatoes anna
4. shrimp newburgh
5. boeuf burguignone
6. rice
7 swedish meat balls
X. vermicelli
o. breaded veal cutlet
10. fresh garden green
Ii. tarragon peas
12. eggplant parmesan
13. beef oriental
14. veal hearts
15. chicken giblets
16. cheesecaserole
17. sliced beef
18. fried chicken
19. barbecued ribs
20. fried coa fish
21. black olives
22. greek olives
23. green olives
d4. dill pickles
25. celery
26. carrots
27. green onions
28. crab apples
29. red peppers
30. radishes
31. corn salad
32. sliced cucumbers
with sour cream
33. sliced tomatoes
with fresh dill
34. red bean salad
35. greek bean salad
36. italian green peppers
37. greek stuffed eggplants
38. sliced beets
39. garlic sauce
40. herring
41. portuguese sardines
42. anchovies
43. cod fish caviar mousse
44. cod fish red caviar
45. liver pate
46. sliced jambon
47. sliced salami
48. sliced cold turkey
49. chicken salad
50. russian fish salad
51. tuna fish salad
52. cottage cheese
53. sliced mushroom in
dill sauce
54. eggrolls
$55 hot mustard sauce
56. stuffed eggs bonnefemme
57. cole slaw
58. cold salmon
59. fresh tuna in soya sauce
$0. butter
61. home made bread
62. sliced tongue
63. horse radish sauce
64. chicken wings Japanese
65. fried squid
66. smoked pork chops
67. potato salad
68. russian salad
69. macaroni salad
70. jellied fruit salad
71. tossed green salad
72. chef's dressing
73. french dressing
74. 1000 island dressig
75. russlan dressing
76. tartar sauce
77. hot sauce
78. bacon crumbs
79. croutons
80. parmesan cheese
81. sliced onions
82. eggplant salad
83. cocktail sausage
84. hors d'oeuvres
85. stuffed grapeleayes
86. greek feta cheese
87. swiss cheese
88. ceddar cheese
89. bread pudding
90. rIce pudding
91.'creme caramel
92. baked apples
93. house cake
94. peaches
95. mandarin oranges
96. orange sliced candles

97. bananas
98. grapes
99. apples
100. watermelon balls
if'ubaiqat
CONTINENTAL DINING
102 S. FIRST 663-2101

THEMIHIAN AIY atuda, arc_1, 97

ul

S

I

COFFEE HOUSE
ISRAELI FOOD-
humus-falafa--petah
and
ENTERTAINMENT
SATURDAY evening 8:30, March 16
at H I LLEL, 1429 Hill admission

75c

M4rrf iiyyr Vi i i J4

i

'U, to study computers as aid to counseling

i1

REEVES HOUSE Presents:
BENEFIT DANCE
FEA TURING:
FROM DETROIT:
CLEAR SPOT BLUES
FROM ANN ARBOR:
CLYSTER
DONATION $1.00 BEER lOc
Proceeds Go to fhe Red Cross
SATURDAY, MARCH 16
8:00 P.M.-2:0-A.M.
MARKLEY SNACK BAR

By CHIP SINCLAIR
By the time you register for next
winter's classes at least some of
your scheduling problems will be
handled by computer or other tech-
nological m e a n s, if everything
works out according to plan.
Associate Dean of LSA Charles
Morris is directing a three-year
project to explore ways technology
can be used to improve undergrad-
uate counseling.
MORRIS HAS applied to the
W.K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle
Creek for money to fund the pro-
ject. The foundation, Morris says,
has indicated they are prepared to
give the funds. If the Board of
Regents accepts the funds-and he
says he is sure they will-the pro-
ject will move forward.
Morris says new counseling pro-
grams have become necessary be-
cause an increasing number of
students are individualizing their
study programs.
"Students no longer march lock-
step fashion through one of several
programs," he says. "As compli-
cated programs with accompany-
ing options and alternatives be-
16e Tr VMS q f !OL Kaiv
For anyone who wants to sing,
play or listen to folk or old-time
music.
NEXT GATHERING
Sunday, March 17, 3-5:30 p.m.
AT THE ARK-1421 Hill St.,
Ann Arbor

come common, the major portion
of counseling time turns to guiding
the student through the labyrinth
of program scheduling."
"BY NECESSITY," Morris adds,
"much of the interest in personal
development, assumed to be an
integral part of the whole process,
has fallen to the side, and ada-
demic 'counseling' has evolved into
academic 'advising,' an activity
characterized primarily by infor-
mation-giving."
By using technology to take care
of the clerical work of counseling,
Morris hopes to free the counselors
for the humanistic aspects of their
work, such as discussing the op-
portunities to a student pursuing
a particular course of studies or
helping him choose between aca-
demic options.
A computer could easily provide
up-to-date information on course
requirements, closed courses, new
courses, short-term courses or new
degree programs, Morris says.

tabs on the individual student on
a continuing basis-whether he has
completed his distribution require-
ments, taken enough courses in'
his concentration area, or exceed-
ed the allowed number of pass-faill
courses.
"Given the complexity of the
v a r i o u s requirements," Morris
says, "it is not unusual that a
disturbing n u m b e r of would-be
graduates discover in their last
term that they cannot in fact grad-
uate without additional work to
satisfy s o m e forgotten require-
ment."
"But a computer," he continues,
"could provide each student a
semester-by-semester audit of re-
quirements, flagging those areas
where limits are being approached
and those where requirements re-
main unmet. The availability of
such a continuous audit could also
encourage some students, leery of
straying too far from conventional
paths, to embark on a more adven-
'turesome and rewarding program
of individualized study."
It will be three years before a

final technological counseling sys- use the new counseling services.
tem is completed. Meanwhile, re- "If you don't like it, you don't have
searchers will institute a series of to use it," Morris says.

pilot projects to find what types of
technology work best for the stu-
dents.
"WE KNOW WHAT types of
services we want the system to!
provide," Morris says, "but we are
not sure which technology is best."
Morris says some pilot projects
should be operative by November
or December of this year.
Students will not be required to

MORRIS CONTINUES, "If the
system isn't accepted by the stu-
dents, if there is no improvement
in counseling services-if they ac-
tually worsen-then we would
abandon the system."
But Morris does not think the
system will be rejected. "Check-
point is an obvious example how
technology can improve counseling.
We think an expanded system
E would be all the more helpful."

Crowd misses Nixon,
during Chicago visit

A COMPUTER

could also keep'

L-.

l

Booksale: 20% discount on all of the 2500
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DAILY.OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Saturday, March 16 ing for sailing instructor. Excellent
Day Calendar salary plus rm and bd. Details avail-
Music School: J. Neville, trombone, able.
SM Recital Hail. 2:30 pm. City of Scottsdale, Ariz. Summer In-
Music School: L. Hebecker, violin, SM tern Mgt. Prog. Workon various city
Recital Hall, 4:30 pm. projects. Practicum credit received.
Music School: T. Fredericks, piano, Career Planning & Placement
SM Recital Hall, 8 pm. 3200 SAB, 764-7456
Dance: "Continuum," Schorling Aud., RECRUITING ON CAMPUS: Mar. 18-
SEB, 8 pm. 21: Action/Peace Corps/Vista; Mar. 19:
Music School: Contemporary Direc- Aetna Life & Casualty, Bankers Life
tions, Rackham Aud., 8 pm. and Casualty Co.; Mar. 20: National
Career Planning & Placement CSS; Mar. 21: Farm Bureau Ins.
3200 SAB, 764-7456 Group, Fruehauf Corp.; Mar. 22: Per-
RECRUITING ON CAMPUS: Mar. 18- macel (a Johnson & Johnson Co.),
21: Action/Peace Corps/Vista; Mar. 19: Burroughs Corp.; Mar. 26: Wayne State
Aetna Life & Casualty, Bankers Life U.; Mar. 27: Lever Bros. Inc., Instit. for
and Casualty Co.; Mar. 20: National Paralegal Training; May 29: The May
CSS; Mar. 21: Farm Bureau Ins. Group, Co.; April 8: Roosevelt U. (for lawyer's
Fruehauf Corp.; Mar. 22: Permacel (a asst. prog.)
Johnso, & Johnson Co.),eBurroughs Summer Placement
Corp.;, Mar. 26: Wayne State U,; Mar. 3200 SAB, 763-4117
27: Lever Bros. Inc., Instit. for Para- Iroquois Resort, Mackinac Island.
legal trng; May 29: The May Co.; Opening for student to operate bike
April 8: Roosevelt U. (for lawyer's asst. shop - must have mechanical ability.
prog.) Maintenance workers needed, also ex-
Summer Placement perienced cook.
3200 SAB, 763-4117 Tom Thomas Org., Southfield, MI.
Iroquois Resort, Mackinac Is. Open- Opening for student free the first of,
ing for student to operate bike shop- April. Set up communication equip-
must havemechanical ability. Mainte- ment and give live show demonstra-
nance workers needed, also experienced tions of Mobile Homes. Excellent salary
cook. plus expenses.
Tom Thomas Org., Southfield, MI. Pleon Yacht Club, Boston MA. Open-
Opening for student free the first of( ing for Sailing Instructor. Excellent
APRIL. Set up communication equip- ! salary plus room and board. Details
ment and give live show demonstra- available.
tions of Mobile Homes. Excellent salary City of Scottsdale, Arizona. Summer
plus expenses. Intern Mgt. Prog. Work on various city
Pleon Yacht Club, Boston MA. Open-! projects. Practicum credit received.

(Continued from Page 1)
NIXON CHOSE instead to re-
main inside the Conrad Hilton Ho-
tel and, predictably, address a
group of businessmen. The crowd,
predictably, chose to address Nix-
on.
And, the air was rife with
threats.
"Hey President Nixon!" scream-
ed an enraged student from Evan-
ston, Ill. "Did you forget the peo-
ple who are here to see you?"
"Nixon's a Communistconspir-
acy!" cried another, pushing his
rain-soaked hair out of his eyes.
"We're not agitated, we're irri-
tated! We're the agitatees!"

ton Hotel and that Democratic
candidate Hubert Humphrey com-
plained of the tear gas that rose
to the highest floor of the, posh
hotel.
THE SCENE may have been the
same, but the script wasn't. The
police were very much in control
of this show. They laughed a lot,
said little, and quietly cordoned off
the groups of protesters into five
or six sub-groups.
The move effectively undermined
the power and impact of the pro-
testers. Unable to group together
and listen to common speakers,
they m a r c h e d in little circles
among themselves.

MYRIAD S I G N S proclaimed THE CROWD dwindled. Mayor
the mood of the mob. "Welcome to Daley's famed men in blue began
the North," read one, with a mili- to laugh more.
tant fish clenched in anger. On an-
other, a nude Nixon streaked'"Police brutality always follows
across a white background: "You police banality," mumbled a dis-
can run, Dick, but you can't hide!" gruntled student. But the closest
it said. the police came to "brutality" was
a little rough talk and a few shov-
Meanwhile, a Salvation Army- I ing incidents.
style band played "Three Blind
Mice" on a tuba, violin and drum. ,"The idea isn't to get through to
The youthful band members, in President Nixon," one protester
black formal suits, later launched tried 'to explain. "No one is that
into a lugubrious, dirge-like rendi- naive. We're trying to get to the
tion of "Hail to the Chief"-or, as people."
it was more-popularly known yes But apparently someone was try-
terday, "Jail to the Chief" and j ing to get through to Nixon. A
"Hail to the Thief." rumor that he was going to leave
surreptitiously through a side door

INCLUDING young and old ele-
ments from Iowa, Michigan, Wis-
consin and Illinois, it was a motley
and colorful crowd that came out
to chant, cheer and rageaaginstz
Nixon. They lined both sides of
Chicago's Michigan A v e n u e in
front of the Conrad Hilton Hotel

sent the remaining protesters scat-
tering like chickens to the back of
the Hilton.
Nixon, h o w e v e r, escaped in-
noticed.
Each year The University Press

RACK HAM STUDENT GOVERNMENT
is now soliciting applications for two
graduate positions on a committee of
the Rackham Executive Board.
THIS COMMITTEE WILL BE CHARGED WITH EXAMINING:
1. Criteria for the allocation of fellowship monies
among major programs.
2. Criteria for block g r a n t s, developmental
grants, and interdisciplinary grants.
Interested parties should phone 763-0109 or come
to Rackham Student Government Office between
12 and 4 p.m. for an application and further infor-
mation. DEADLINE for applications is March 21,
4 p.m.

Ironically, the s a i e street receives more than 600 inquiries
served as a setting for the 1968 from authors all over the world,
riots and the Democratic Conven- and eventually publishes about 30
tion. And it was in the Conrad Hil- books in a typical year, including

CINEMA GUILD
Presents the
12th an Arbor
Film Festival
-TONIGHT-
1, 7, 9 (each different)
FREE SHOW TODAY at 1 P.M.
$1-ARCH. AUD.
info. 662-8871

paperback reprints. About half of
the new titles each year are by
Urizersity faculty members.

Camp Ma-Hi-Ya
Toledo Jewish Community center
WILL INTERVIEW on CAMPUS
WED., March 20, 9:30-5
POSITIONS:
Arts/Crafts
Waterfront-WSI
Nature
Compcraft
Tripping
Cook-Kosher
N urse
Camp location:Chelsea, Mich.
Register:
Summer Placement Office
3200 SAB-763-4117

4

II .. I I1 _ __1

'I

..

This isyour keytounprecedented calculadig
capacity. Only Hewlett-Packard offers it
It lets you "speak" to your calculator with total consistency, because
It lets you load data into a 4-Register Stack. This means: (1) you always
enter and process your data the same way, no matter what your problem;
(2) you don't have to re-enter data; (3) you can see all intermediate data
anytime.
Our HP-45 is one of two pre-programmed scientific pocket-sized
computer calculators with this key. That's one reason it's the most pow-
erful pre-programmed pocket-sized scientific computer calculator. Here
are three of many others:
1. It's pre-programmed to handle 44 arithmetic, trigonometric and
logarithmic functions and data manipulation operations beyond the
basic four (+, -, x, +).
2. It lets you store nine constants in its nine Addressable Memory
Registers, and it gives you a "Last X" Register for error correction or
multiple operations on the same number.
3. It displays up to 10 significant digits in either fixed-decimal or
scientific notation and automatically positions the decimal point through-
out its 200-decade range.
Our HP-35 is the other. It handles 22 functions, has one Addressable
Memory Register and also displays up to 10 digits in either fixed-decimal
or scientific notation. It's the second most powerful pre-programmed
pocket-sized scientific computer calculator.
Both of these exceptional instruments are on display now. If you're
looking for unprecedented calculating capacity for your money, by all
means see and test them.

HEWLETT PACKARD

Hewlett-Packard makes the most
advanced pocket-sized computer

-, ' 2 '' '.' ' ' . M M; . tJ t bx+'Y'': Y' ,,.:F4=,n, C: N' J tR''Y i 2 F? ~'...; ..;

I

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