100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

«...

Vienna Choir Boys
master the high C's

WABX AIR WAVES:
Who' to release new album

By BETH NISSEN
A doting audience soaked up
the clean charm and msi. of
the Vienna Choir Boys Monday
night at Power Center.
The first third of the program
introduced the audience tr the
boys' musical style with two La-
tin a cappella numbers and a
deftly harmonized performance of
Haydn's Alleluja. Antonia Vi-
valdi's Laudamus Te was lilting-
ly soloed by the choir's ,ie a d
soprano.
The Jealous Primadonna, a hu-
morous operetta, comprised the
second portion of the program.
The boys waltzed on stage in sa-
tin Louis XIVish dresses a n d
suits, complete with powdered
wigs. Spoken lines were delivered
in weinerschnitzal-accented Eng-
lish and songs were sung in Ger-
man. With the aid of the choir-
boys' well-rehearsed and clever
stage gestures and the program
notes, the audience was able to,
follow the story and become fur-
ther enamored with the lead so-
prano and a chuby, bespectacled
alto playing the aging, jealous
primadonna.
The final section of the pro-
gram featured a rather washed-
out delivery of Schubert's fam-
ous Die Nachtigall and a solo
Onti
By DOUG MULLKOFF
I didn't always have a downed
out attitude about Detroit. As a
matter of fact, I always tried to
like it. Out in the suburbs, ev-
erybody was down on Detroit; it
just had no mass appeal. But
I've always had some sort of ro-
mantic love for the city - some-
thing that I realize seems hard
to imagine. But when I was a
kid, Detroit really was a gas.
In high school, I'd try to drag
a few friends downtown to dig
on the happenings.
We had a,-choice, or kind of a
choice. We could see Weather
Report in Ypsi, at the Bowen
Fieldhouse (which isn't my fav-
orite concert hall) or we could
see them a day earlier at the

by the second-string I e a d so-
prano. Three Austrian Folksongs
were performed with more spirit
than any other offering of the
evening, followed by a lively foot-
tapping Tritsch-Tratsch Polka
The boys' voices were angelU-
cally unpolluted and upper range,
but overall blending was poor.
The lead first soprano's glass-
shattering voice was obvious in
everything sung. Descant voices
are perhaps more difficul: to con-
trol; it may be too much to ask
an 11-year-old to be a master of
the high C's and blend with his
friends as well.
The boys themselves were al-
most of more interest than their
music. The choir has been per-
forming since the time of .Coper-
nicus and Columbus. The twenty
boys, most of them about 12
years old, stand at attention in
their sailor suits, with t n e i r
hands behind their backs, and
open their mouths in easy unison
to release steeple-high notes. It's
almost impossible not to look up
and down the rows of wedl scrub-
bed faces frm so far away and
smile maternally as they all bow
in unison at songs' end. The and-
ience mentally fondled the boys,
clucked over them, and pinched
their cheeks.

Daily Photo by ALISON RUTTAN
For $24 worth of trinkets and Kod chrome . . .
You too can have a souvenir memento plate complete with glitter commemorating the 1974 Ann Arbor
Film Festival, through Sunday at Architecture Auditorium.

Fie

Detroit

concert scene

By WABX
A $2,700,000 settlement has
been reached with Terry Knight
and the Grand Funk Railroad.
The settlement includes $1,100,-
000 cash and interests held by
G.F.R. Enterprises. The legal
battle has been staged for over
two years concerning the legal
rights to the Grand Funk name
. . . Terry Knight walks away
with the cash, and the group
keeps the name.
The newest Who album will
probably be called High Num-
bers. Selections on the album
will include songs performed by
the group before they were called
the Who. The group was pre-
viously named High Numbers
and their repertoire was a com-
bination of rhythm and blues
and surfer music.
The Roxy Theatre in Los An-
geles will be converted into an
English Pub for the grand in-
troduction of The Butts Band.
The Butts Band includes former
Doors members Robbie Krieger
and John Densmore plus Jess
Roden, Roy Davies and Phillip
Chen.
Seals and Croftswere in for
a surprise after they're concert
Gig at Kent State University
... While they were performing,
someone boarded the group's pri-
vate plane and stole $1200 in
cash, some personal items, and
a number of blank, signed,
checks. Police are still investi-
gating.
Keith Richard, from The Roll-
ing Stones, has been denied en-
try .into France. Richard was
convicted for illegal possession of
drugs last year. Also busted at
the same time, were Bobby
Keys, and Anita Pallenburg -. -
all three were fined, given sus-
pended sentences and banned
from France for two years.
A New York T.V. sportscaster
had to apologize on the air twice
last week after the station re-
ceived more than 900 complaints.
Dick Schaap made the statement
that the stud horse secretariat
and Riva Ridge "were the most
famous pair of stablemates since
Joseph and Mary." Schaap said
he made his comparison between
CINEMA GUILD
Presents the
12th an Arbors
Film Festival
-TONIGHT-
7, 9, 11, (each different)
$1-ARCH. AUD.
info. 662-8871

the two horses and Joseph and
Mary as a form of light amuse-
ment, and didn't mean to insult
the public.
Elvis Presley is being billed as
"The Second Major Superstar
Concert Tour of 1974." Elvis
opens in Tulsa on March 1st with
a fast swing through the South
for 24 shows in 20 days. The
tour ends with 3 show in Mem-
phis.
Dr. John from New Orleans
has been jamming with a varied
group of entertainers . . . John
Lennon and Elton John joined
with Dr. John at the Troubador
. . , and last week Steve Miller
and Johnny Winter joined them
on stage.
A number of concert tours are
beginning soon . . . 10 C.C. from
England will do the night club
circuit on the East Coast . . -
Melissa Manchester begins an
Eastern night club and concert
tour . . . Johnny Winter will
soon be working his second na-
tional tour ,since his comeback
Chicago will start their
1974 tour of the East and South.
The T.V. networks have started
to cash in on the importance of
rock music. One T.V. network is
planning a full - scale outdoor
rock festival April 6th, at On-
tario Motor Speedway in Cali-
fornia. Deep Purple will head-
line with other feature perform-
ances by Black Sabbath, Seals
and Crofts, Black Oak Arkansas,
the Eagles, and Earth, Wind and
Fire. There are presently no
plans to broadcast the event.
The "Glitter of the Week
Award" goes to Grand Funk for
their next album ... the album
will be titled "Shinin' On", and
reportedly will be jacketed in a
3D graphic cover with special
glasses included to appreciate
the affect, a label that glows in
the dark . . . and enclosed will
be a 3D poster . . . the album

is being produced by Todd Rund-
gren.
The energy crisis will take its
toll on the groups touring in the
U. S. Several groups have can-
celled because of the energy
crisis already. Summer tours no
longer scheduled include Steely
Dan, Joe Walsh, Dawn, Chi Col-
trane, and Joni Mitchell.
Short Notes: Bob Dylan was
offered $2,000,000 for movie
rights to his concert tour, but
refused . . . Elvis Presley will
do an Easter special on NBC-TV
. Sergio Meades was hired as
a consultant for an anthology of
South American music for the
Smithsonian Institution .
Cheech & Chong have made a 4-
minute cartoon of "Basketball
Jones" to be released soon ... .
Chicago will do a T.V. special
this summer . . . John Denver
will write and sing the theme
song for a new Disney movie
Bears and I . . . Chick Churchill
of Ten Years After has installed
a complete weather station on
his roof,.
Attention
Advertisers
far total campus
saturation over
air call
763-3501
650 AM-
The Rock of Ann Arbor

the Eastown, except they only
let in half of the people, even
though it is twice the size. And
they looked like the same peo-
ple too. All downed out and ob-
livious to anything but rock and
roll!
But what were they doing
here? Why did all of these rock
and roll people come downtown
to see a progressive jazz band,
and Brian Auger? Without even
hearing any music yet, we all
felt a wierdness about this au-
dience; they just didn't seem to
fit. Weather Report came on,
and started makin' me move.
For some still undeciphered
spiritual reason, jazz has always
made me move. That mystical
haze that the )music had put me

cony, which overlooked the main
lobby, and began pelting inno-
cent victims with little ice cubes.
One guy, his bald head giving
us a perfect target, accepted
four bullseyes, before he rea-
.lized that he was being attacked
from above. Here I was, doing
all of those things I wanted to
do when I was eight years old,
without parental restraint.
That may seem ironic, but the
whole place is ironic. The vel-
vet tapestries and curtains hung
down to the backs of frazzled
quallude heads, and the men's
smoking lounge, with an impres-
sively carpeted outer room and
finely painted mosaics, revealed
no more than than a urine-cov-
ered john, with lines of people

"Here I was, doing all the things I wanted to do when I was eight years
old, without parental restraint. That may seem ironic, but the whole
place is ironic."
'i" :. Yr9' i" 4".."ti4 :h.'r JJ.. r .M ., :,;/,..r ." ;r ---------

have been the only ones who
found this show to be on the biz-
zare side. But I was wrong.
After the band (who call them-
selves White Witch, and were
introduced as the most cosmicly
attuned rock and roll band in the
w o r I d) finished their first
screeching and gutty-feedback
song, the whole audience let out
with a roar of boos.
I must confess that I do think
that it is rude, and an awfully
bogue thing to do to a perform-
er, but I felt that I had an obli-
gation to let the band know how
wierd they were. I had a hard
time even trying to feel sorry
for them. But their show was
entertaining. For each song they
played, the boos got louder, and
more and more garbage was fly-
ing toward the stage, until the
lead singers strutting got faster
and faster to avoid getting hit.
After the echoing of the boo-
ing began reverberating across
the auditorium, the performer
had the gall to ask to play an-
other one, and was answered
with a loud no . . . a clear con-
census. But he came on anyway,
and tried to bribe the audience
into listening, by dedicating the
next song to all of the reefer
smokers. The reefer smokers
didn't want to hear it.
After the act we wondered if
the band was back stagersplit-
ting up, I couldn't seeta better
way of telling them that that
was the thing to do, then by our
discrete method. I mean they
couldn't even make it in Detroit,
where they were dressed like
their audience.
My hopes to have a quick beer
after the concert were quelled
when I looked at my watch as

Brian Auger came on, and no-
ticed that it was quarter to two.
My God, I've been here since
8:30! Auger and his Oblivion
Express were great, with the
least amount of confusion main-
ly because everyone was so
worn out that they were nod-
ding left and right (ZZZZZ), and
those who were awake were try-
ing to figure out who the band
on stage was, and which record
was their hit.
Feeling content and at ease for
the first time, my friends and I,
and our new acquaintances from
Ypsi lay back. But not for long.
This dude who was all dressed
up looking like a stand in for
Stin Ra himself started yelling
from the aisle beside us, to his
friends half w .y down the row
... "HEY WILLIE!! HEY WIL-
LIE!! WILLIE, LE'S GO GIT
FLIPPER!! COME ON, LE'S
GO GIT FLIPPER!!!
Willie, to my dismay, took a
hit of Jim Beam from his pint,
and acted like- he hadn't heard
Sun Ra. The situation repeated
itself, until finally (presumably)
Sun Ra went to find Flipper
himself.
As we left the palace, I kept
trying to tell myself that it's a
cool city, Detroit's really an
okay place. It isn't a bad town,
I just keep on having negative
experiences here. My peaceful
drifting of the mind was sodden-
ly interrupted by an old wino
w h o apparently needed a
drink...
"Hey . . . come here kid
you got a buck for me!! come
here!! want to buy a watch??
How 'bout a lady for the night??
you want ta buy a diamond
ring?? . . . hey, come here bud-
dy . .

TONIGHT at 7 & 9 p.m.!
OUR MOST POPULAR FILM IS
BACK AGAIN, AFTER ALL!
Wild raffish comedy and a real de-
light! A Scottish private in World War
I releases the inmates from a mental
asylum in a French town that is sit'fing
on a time bomb left by the Germans.
The sanity of insanity-or vice-versa?
with Genevieve Buiold.

I

BATES,
PI-ILIPPE DE BROCA
COLOR."y DELUXE TECHISCOPC

If you likie this movie be sure to
DEVIL BY THE TAlL by the same
rector-March 27th!
French, with English subtitles.

see
di-

new and exciting Michigan Pal-
ace! And it's downtown too! It
took us twenty minutes to find a
parking place, and we tried to
get the car as close to the street
light as possible.
After sliding past the local
spare change dudes, we quickly
went through the front door. The
characters standing around
watching us reminded me of
those guys who are always
sleeping in the doorway to the
Fox Theatre, just down the
street.
When he walked in, my mind
and body suddenly had a jolting
De ja-vu rush. I hadn't been in
the Michigan Theatre since I
was eight years old, seeing Ben
Hur with my parents. My God!
what are all of these heavies do-
ing here? All sleeked out, sit-
ting alongside these marble pil-
lars, and crystal chandeliers?
The people looked like they'd
blown a week's pay on trying to
flip you out by their freeked out
clothing. Guys wearing irides-
cent hawaiian print shirts, and
girls with full length gowns with
mink trim and ten inch plat-
forms strutting around the main
floor, checking each other out,
and leaving themselves open to
be checked.
This was all awfully strange to
us - not new, but forgotten. De-
troit always seemed to produce
the "Rock and roll glamour peo-
ple," and we'd seen them at De-
troit concerts before, but it had
been kind of wiped from my,
memory. For the first time since
I walked into my parents gour-
met club, have a felt really out
of place with my hiking boots
and bluejeans. I actually felt like
they were lookingat me.th
We found a seat in the third
balcony, and Nance pointed out
how this place looked just like
People! Music! Food!
BACH CLUB
Julia DECKER, soprano
Laura SHTLER, flute
Beth GILBERT, piano
VIVALDI: Motetto
BACH: Arias for flute
& soprano
MOZART: Exsultate,
Jubilate!

in was suddenly broken. The dis-
turbance came from the row
above me.
"There anymore snopps?" .. .
hey . . . there anymore snopps?
Hey Jim . . . is there anymore
snopps. . . HEY JIM. . . GIVE
MY THE BOTTLE OF.
SNOPPS!!
"What?"
"I WANT SOME SNOPPS! !
"NO MAN...THER'S ONLY
TWO MORE SIPS ... HEY ...
THAT JOINT'S ONLY FOR US,
DON'T START PASSING IT
AROUND!!
What followed blew me away.
The band was getting into some
really tight jams peaking out at
low and high volume levels; but
when the music got quiet, some
geeks in the audience would start
yelling out such idiocies as "kick
out the jams", or "rock and
roll!" I felt embarrassed. The
guy sitting next to me, looking
thoroughly disgusted, said that
this was the last time that he
was giving Detroit a chance.
Weather Report was getting
near the end of their set, bring-
ing the Weather Report Suite to
a finale, with only a cymbal and
a high organ note playing, when
some all-knowing rocker yelled
out "HEY!-you guys must be in
the wrong town!" With that, the
final insult, the band left the
stage.
The intermission proved to be
a highlight of the evening. After
mingling some more, we perch-
ed ourselves on a third floor bal-

lined up behind every stall to
make their contribution. The kind
of people walking around were
the reasons parents have for tell-
ing their kids not to take drugs.
They are enough to make kids
quit drugs.
Anyway, we ran out of ice-
cubes, and the next band had
started playing - some local
group to play before Auger.
When we reentered the hall, we
were amazed to see the stage lit
up with strange neon, irrodes-
cent and black lights; and some
idiot with everything but a boa
constrictor in his hands jumping
around and screaming "YEA!" I
looked at my friend, and we
started to laugh. The guy who
hates Detroit was rolling in his
seat in disbelief. This was quite
an act! I asked the guy where
he was from, and he said Ypsi-
lanti.
I thought that must be why he
and my two friends and I must
25% off
prepaid Cambridge Univer-
sity Book orders (few excep-
tions)., I
Deadline March 23rd.
DAVID'S BOOKS
209 S.. STATE
663-8441

Auditorium A, Angell Hall

I

COMING NEXT TUESDAY-McCABE AND MRS. MILLER
NEXT WEDNESDAY-FRITZ THE CAT. Rated X.

I1

a

s ,

I

I

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290
Open 12:45. Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 P.M.
3 Academy Award
Nominations incl,
BEST ACTOR
JACK NICHOLSON
"THE LAST
DETAI L"

A

i a T . ... ___. r

PAUL NEWMAN
& ROBERT REDFORD in
"THE
STING" (PG)
WINNER OF 10
ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS!
OPEN DAILY 1 P.M.
Shows at 1:30,4, 6,6:30
& 9 PM
E3fs t± I;

I

a

BENEFIT DANCE
FOR

med iatricS presents
"AN OFFERING YOU CAN'T REFUSE"

MARY
RICHMAN

DEMOCRAT
2nd WARD

DL- tLtL#)*

I

mli I tmi

1

I

featuring
LIGHTNIN'
FRIDAY

WED. OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5,7 & 9 P.M
Thurs. at 7 & 9 only
RobertU
Redford
a SJerem iah
Johnson"

214 s... university
A M P11S
atre ' Phone'646416.

a

,/:L

00 p.m.

March 15

i A ta. 'Ma . i . ter. r I I

t UR

..U: as. ~ ~ .J ~''' };..s'!: .w .... ...""' ''C

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan