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March 13, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

rage i nree

THE MICHIGAN DAILY rage lhree

.

Frisco judge gives
order to halt strike

By AP and Reuter
SAN FRANCISCO-A superior
court judge yesterday ordered
the immediate halt of a nearly
six-day-old city workers' strike
and told police to enforce the
order.
The order came in response to
a San Francisco chamber of
commerce lawsuit asking $1 bil-
lion in damages if the walkout is
not stopped.
The strike shut down public
transportation in the city, kept
most of the students and about
half of the citys teachers at
home and allowed billions of
gallons of raw sewage to flow
untreated into San Francisco
Bay.
POLICE SAID they would not
act against the strikers until
picketers were identified, noti-
fied and ordered arrested by a
judge.
"We are not going to arrest
any peaceful pickets," said May-
or Joseph Alioto. "Any picket
who engages in violence will be
arrested . . . The court's order
is not going to solve any strike.
"I don't want anybody to get
any false hopes about the
court'sfabilitytosdeal with the
strike. Only one thing will get
this strike settled - to get
both parties back together and
stop the outrageous pollution of
jthe bay," he said.
E THE STRIKE'S effect has
been intensified by the refus-
al of nonstriking union members
to cross picket lines deployed
against nonstruck services, in-
Iclu ding transit and sewage treat-
ment facilities. Police and fire
operations have been maintain-
ed.
Commuters have been forced
back into theirncars because
buses, trolleys and cable cars
a. f 1 fw AM

are not running. Children have
been shivering in schools be-
cause janitors are on strike. Rou-
tine hospital services have been
curtailed for lack of attendants.
In Sacramento, Gov. Ronald
Reagan said the state would
take over the four sewage
plants if their raw discharge
generates a public health threat.
JOHN CROWLEY, secretary of
the San Francisco Labor Council
and chief union negotiator, said
there would be no formal com-
ment until the order is served
and studied by attorneys.
"I don't think it's a valid
order," said Victor Van Bourg,
attorney for four striking Service
Employes International Union
locals claiming 10,000 members.
The workers walked out last
Thursday, demanding a $16 mil-
lion a year pay boost and dental
care. They rejected the city's
latest $8.5 million offer earlier.
ic
ENEWs
C
do your pet a favor!
UNLICENSED
UNLEASHED
UNLAWFUL
COUNTY BUILDING
. t u w n

INCREASE INTELLIGENCE,
ENERGY, CREATIVITY
Transcendental Meditation
expands consciousness
unfolds creativity
increased clarity of mind
improves concentration
releases stress and tension
brings increasing fulfillment
Lecture: TONIGHT 8 p.m.
faculty club lounge, Michigan Union
TOPIC: Transcendental Meditation-The practical
aspect of the Science of Creative Intelligence.
Lecturer: DOUGLAS DALLER 761-8255
THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES
presents
THE THIRD ANNUAL HAYWARD KENISTON LECTURE
by
PROFESSOR KENNETH BURKE
of the
University of Pittsburgh
I WANTED TO WRITE A SATIRE

i

AP Photo
FORMER U. S. Attorney General John Mitchell walks up to the feder al courthouse in New York yesterday as his trial on criminal con-
spiracy charges continues.
Witness Sears denies he asked

THURSDAY, March 14
4:10 P.M.

Rackham Amphitheater
Rackham Building

U

Mitchell
NEW YORK (41) - Government
witness Harry Sears testified
yesterday that he never asked
former Atty. Gen. John Mitchell
to "fix" financier Robert Vesco's
fraud case with the Securities
and E x c h a n g e Commis-
sion (SEC).
"Never, at any time," Sears
said at the Federal criminal con-
spiracy trial of Mitchell and for-
mer Commerce Secretary Maur-
ice Stans.
In cross-examination, Sears
was questioned over a series of
meetings he had with Mitchell on

to

fix

Vesco fraud case

behalf of Vesco, a secret $200,000
contributor to President Nixon's
1972 re-election campaign.
VESCO'S $200,000 contribution
is at the heart of the govern-
ment's case against Mitchell and
Stans, who are accused of im-
peding an SEC fraud investiga-
tion into Vesco's international fi-
nancial operations, in return for
the donation.
Sears, former Republican ma-
jority leader of the New Jersey
state Senate, was indicted with
Mitchell and Stans but was grant-

A OFFiCAA LV."S BUt LL
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ed immunity ' from prosecution
for his testimony on behalf of
the government. Vesco was also
indicted but fled the country.
Under direct examination for
the better part of five days,
Sears had testified that he turn-
ed over the contribution to
Stans in Washington on April 10,
1972, then went to Mitchell's of-
fice. The two defendants had
quit their Cabinet posts to direct
Nixon's re-election campaign.
THERE WAS FURTHER tes-
timony that Sears told Mitchell
of the exchange of money and
that the latter then picked up
the telephone and arranged for
Sears to meet that same day on
Vesco's behalf with the then
SEC Chairman William Casey.
Mitchell's attorney Peter Flem-
ing asked Sears if Mitchell hadn't
promised the meeting with Casey
a month before the contribution
was made, depending only upon
when the SEC chairman was
available.
"That's correct," Sears said.
Sears was confronted with his
grand jury testimony that he had
not even discussed the cam-
paign contribution with Mitchell
April 10.
"EVEN TODAY you have no
recollection of ever telling Mr.
Mitchell at that time, April 10,
that the contribution was in
cash?" asked Fleming.
"I never told him that," re-

plied the witness. "I should qual-
ify that - I never told him that
until much later."
Sears testified that Mitchell's
first attempt to arrange a meet-
ing with Casey fell through be-
cause the SEC chairman was out
of town.
Sears said he wanted to see
Casey personally so that he
could present Vesco's side of the
story before staff investigators
of the SEC took any fraud action
against the financier.

TAMARACK WEEKEND
March 22-24
Join us for this unique opportunity to spend a week-
end with one of the world's, greatest theologians,
Professor Emil Fackenheim.
TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION:
"The Sabbath as Messianic Anticipation"
"Auschwitz & Jerusalem: The Heroic Age of Jewry"
For reservations call HILLEL, 663-4129
total cost $12

7 ."r '' r .' v'~ . . _ '' :ar:;:,y .SS fl"WC.>X..M.M.:!.eC;XM:

Wednesday, March 13
Day Calendar
Anatomy: B. Lucchesi, "The Elector-a
physiologic Basis for Cardiac Arryth-x
mia & Actions of Antiarrythmic
Drugs," 4804 Med. St. II, 1:10 pm.
Ethics, Religion: R. Merriman, ru-
trologer, "Aquarian Age Consciousness
through the Celestial Arts: The Spirit- t
ual Significance of 1974," Aud. A, An-
gell Hall, 3 pm.
Classical Studies, Kelsey Museum: M.'
Torelli, U of Cagliari, Sardinia, "Elo-t
gia Tarquiniensia: New Light on Etru-1
scan & Roman History in the Early Re-I
public," 2009 Angell Hall, 4 pm. .
Statistics: E .Parzen, SUNY at Buf-
falo, "Some Solutions to Some Time1
Series Modeling & Prediction Prob-c
lems," 1007 Angell Hall, 4 pm.
Journalism: M. Hunter, Washington
Bur., New York Times, "The Washing-t
ton Scene," Aud. 3, MLB, 04:pmr.1
Music School: D. Barick, honorsi
harpischord recital, SM Recital Hall, 8c
pm.
Career Planning & Placement
3200 SAB 764-7460
Grad Program in Advertising, North-
western U., to prepare for planning ad-
vertising programs and for manage-
ment, to work in media or agency or
mfg. 12 monthe program. Write Medill
School of Journalism, Northwestern U.,
Evanston, Ill 60201
Babcock Grad Sch. of Management,
Wake Forest U., Winston-Salem, NC
27109 offers 25 fellowships from $1000
to $3000 for first year of study
Financial aid for grad school in Bus
Ad: $3978 for teaching assistantship,
TONIGHT!
University Players present
Obie Award Winners
HAPPY ENDING and
DAY OF ABSENCE
by Douglas Turner Ward
8 P.M.-Mendelssohn
Theatre
U Players Ticket Office open
10 A.M.-1 P.M., 2 P.M.-5 P.M.
764-6300. Mendelssohn The-
atre Box Office open 6 P.M.
763-1085.

Washington State U. Write to dean of
Grad School, Pullman, Wash. 99163.
Accounting master's degree for non-
accounting majors 15 mos. including
paid internship of 3 mo at $775 per mo
at Northeastern U, Boston 02115.
Summer Placement
3200 SAB, 763.4117
Camp Oakland, Ml, Emotionally Dis-
turbed. Will interview Thurs. Mar. 14,
9:30 to 5. Cabin counselors in all spe-
cialized fields.
Camp Hamarack, MI, Coed. Will in-
terview Fri. Mar. 15-morning only.
Male counselors, all fields. Male/fe-
male weaving, ceramics, waterfront.
Truck/Bus Driver.
Silverman Village, Ortonville. Emo-1
tionally disturbed boys. Male staff ex-
cept for Arts/Crafts and waterfront
(m/f). Fri., Mar. 15, 9 to 1.
Camp Wathana, Detroit Camp Fire
Girls. Will interview Tues. Mar. 19,
from 10 to 5. Open-unit counselors,
waterfront, riding, arts/crafts, nature,
etc.

- -
Danish films.
romising of-
,entions. (X)
E011
I \ 8
$1.2

THE MICHIGAN PAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 128
Wednesday, March 13, 1974
his edited and managedby students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area): $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
{ and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip,
uion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area)- $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail ;otheY
slates and foreign).
$2.50

!.
tt
. '.
t IY..
=e }:
S4; '.
.

One of the most daring of the newC
Banned in Denmark for its uncomp
front to Danish social & family conv
TONITE ONLY
7 & 9 p.m. Natural Sci. Aud.

i

F r ..

. ......

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without law school.
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DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES
Wednesday, March 13, 3-5 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A
AQUARIAN AGE CONSCIOUSNESS THROUGH THE
CELESTIAL ARTS: THE SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 1974"
by RAYMOND MERRIMAN, certified professional astrologer through the American Federation
of Astrologers and founder of the Aquarian Revelation Center.

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