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March 12, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN :DAILY

Page Three

TH IHIA AIY cg he

FBI claims kidnapers
forced Hearst complaints

The University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM/THEATRE ANN ARBOR
PRESENTS
AN EVENING OF MIME

WITH

C. W. METCALF

AP Photo
Onoda unsheaths his sword
Japanese Lt. Hiroo Onoda, second from the left, shows the sword which protected him during his thirty
years of hiding in the Philippine jungles. The World War II holdout formally surrendered by present-
ing the sword to Maj. Gen. Jose Rancudo, far left, Philippine Air Force Commander.
BRITISH PARLIAMENT CONVENES:
Liberals threaten Labor govt.

SAN FRANCISCO (P) - The
FBI said yesterday kidnaped Pa-
tricia Hearst's accusations of po-
litical intrigue against the agen-
cy and a letdown by her family
were put into the victim's
mouth by her terrorist captors.
Meantime, Alameda County
Dist. Atty. Lowell Jensen indi-
cated that two men accused of
the terrorist - claimed assassin-
ation of Oakland School Supt.
Marcus Foster could get the
televised news conference they -
have demanded if some condi-
tions are met.'
In a 30-minute tape, the kid-
napers demanded thatnation-
wide television broadcast facili-
ties be made available to pur-
ported Symbionese Liberation
Army (SLA) "soldiers" Joseph
Remiro and Russell Little, as the
pair have demanded. They are
charged with killing Foster last
Nov. 6.
Defense lawyer William Gagen
said yesterday he would have a
statement today or Wednesday,
adding, "We must protect the in-
terests of our clients in a fair
trial and to comply in some way
jwith demands of the SLA." He
said last week such a conference
might not be in the best inter-
ests of his clients.
THE SLA BROKE a 17-day si-
lence over the weekend in tapes
sent tovBerkeleyradiostation
KPFA, San Francisco station
KSAN, and Oakland station
KDIA.
Hearst, in the three tape-re-
corded SLA communiques, ac-
cused the FBI of wanting her
killed to promote President Nix-
on's policies, and scolded her
parents for not "doing every-
thing you can" to have her freed.
Charles Bates, FBI agent in
charge of the kidnaping investi-
gation, asked if Hearst, abducted
Feb. 4, was being forced to make
those statements, said, "I don't
know, but I think it's a logical
assumption."
Bates said that since the SLA
I was holding Hearst, "she's say-
ing what they tell her to say." j
BATES SAID none of the state-
ments on the tape of Hearst's

voice is "going to change the
way the FBI is making its inves-
tigation." And he repeated the
FBI's intention of '"taking no ac-
tion which would jeopardize Pat-
ty's life."
He denied an SLA accusation
on the tape that the FBI is
breaking into houses around the
country as part of the kidnap
probe. Bates said: .
"The FBI has not busted in
any houses. We do not bust in

without warrants and we have
no warrants in this case."
At the Hearst family's Hills-
borough mansion Sunday, Cath-
erine Hearst said she listened to
the tape of her daughter's voice
and said. "I know that while
Patty is a captive, she'll have to
mutter all the words dictated by
her captors.'
The food giveaway demanded
by the SLA is to resume today.

Congressmen seek-
answers to oil ads

STEVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
HOME COOKING IS OUR SPECIALTY

TWO PERFORMANCES
at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.
SUNDAY, MARCH 17
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
Tickets available at the PTP Ticket Office,
located in the Mendelssohn Theatre Bldg.
Call 764-0450
Mr. Metcalf's visit to Ann Arbor was made possible
through a grant from the Ann Arbor Foundation.

By AP and Reuter
LONDON-The Liberal Party,
which holds a potential balance
of power in the British Parlia-
ment, has pledged to bring down
Prime Minister Harold Wilson's
minority Labor government "as
soon as possible," possibly as
early as today.
The threat tempered the opti-
mism in government and indus-
try over yesterday's return to a
five-day work week and the re-
turn to work of the 270,000 coal
miners after a four-week strike.
Concerted opposition by the
Conservative Party of former.
Prime Minister Edward Heath,
who lost office after his party
was defeated in February's elec-
tions, plus the small parties like .
the Liberals, could easily upset
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 127
Tuesday, March 12, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other stater
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip.
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail 'other
states and foreign).

Wilson's fragile hold on govern-
ment. The danger was expected
to influence the major govern-
ment policy-making t h r o n e
speech to be read to Parliament
by Queen Elizabeth today.
SUNDAY NIGHT, Liberal Par-
ty Member of Parliament Cyril
Smith told reporters his party
has sounded out -Welsh and Scot-
tish nationalists, as well as Nor-
thern Ireland members to seek
support for a vote against Wil-
son over the throne speech.
"Mr. Wilson has no mandate
to govern either in terms of
seats or votes . . . we in the
Liberal Party take the view that
our task is to get a Labor gov-
ernment out as soon as possi-
ble," Smnith said.
Meanwhile, sources close to
Prime Minister Harold Wilson
said yesterday that he is shelv-
ing the more radical programs
promised by his Labor party,
among them a plan to nationalize
Britain's 50 biggest companies.
Instead, the sources said Wil-
son is drafting a moderate pack-
age of bread and butter issues

for the opening of Parliament to-
day aimed at insuring the sur-
vival of his minority administra-
tion. Labor's prospects have al-
ready improved through settle-
ment of the coal miners' strike.
The package drafted by Wilson
is to be read by Queen Elizabeth
at the opening ceremony. Meas-
ures reportedly included appear
designed to attract votes from
women, trade unionists, pension-
ers and Scottish nationalists in
new elections that could come
at any time.
Labor's radical plans are being
deferred rather than dropped, ac-
cording to sources close to the
cabinet. "It is all a matter of
timing," one explained.
LABOR SOURCES said the
Queen's speech would contain a
brief reference to a pledge to
renegotiate Britain's member-
ship terms in the Common Mar-
ket and then ask the public in a
referendum if Britain should
remain in the market.
Foreign Secretary James Cal-,
laghan is expected to spell out
details on this later in the week.

WASHINGTON (p) -- In an ef-
fort to counter oil company ad-
vertising, 16 members of Con-
gress asked the nation's 7,000
broadcasters yesterday to car-
ry commercials suggesting the
oil companies, not the consum-
ers will have to change their
habits.
Announcing the media cam-
paign at a news conference Rep.
Benjamin Rosenthal (D-N.Y.)
cited the "Fairness Doctrine" in
his effort to convince the radio
and television stations to carry
the announcements to balance
what he calls a multi-million dol-
lar advertising campaign waged
by the energy industry.
He said that if his efforts are
not successful within 30 to 60
days, legislative action to re-
move certain tax exemptions
granted to companies for adver-
tising expenses may be neces-
sary.
We Style Hair ...
We Don't Just Cut It
appointments available
Dascola Barbers
Arborland-971-9975
Maple Vilage-761 -2733
East Liberty-66-9329
East "University-662-0354

"THE AVERAGE consumer -
the average American - simply
has not been afforded an equal
opportunity to hear the other
side," Rosenthal said.
"We must combat the gross
imbalance created by the indus-
try's advertising blitz if the pub-
lic is to make intelligent and
well-informed decisions about the
current situation and future na-
tional energy policy."
ROSENTHAL said the oil com-
pany advertising is aimed at
expressing a political message,
that the firms are not responsi-
ble for the energy crisis, and not
at selling a product. Thus, he
- said, they should not be con-
sidered tax deductible as a busi-
ness expense.

Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05
Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
Je:ly-$ 1.40
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Toast & Jelly-$1.90

Specials This Week
Beef Stroganoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Goulash
Egg Rolls
Home-made Soups
(Beef, Barley, Clam Chowder,
etc.)
Chili, Veqetable Tempura
(served after 2 p.m.)

FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

IL

I
'J

I

Tues.-Fri.: 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.
Sat.-Sun.: 9:00 a.m-9 pm
1313 SO UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

r

THE DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES
AND CLASS/CAL STUDIES
PRESENTS A SERIES OF LECTURES ON:

FORM
OF

AND

L- 1sI I

Jacobson's Open Thursday and Friday Until 9;00 P.M.

TRAGE:11dYJ

March

12: Professor Buttrey
"Tragedy as Form in the World of Euripides"

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FREE FILMS WEDNESDAY
THE HEALER-filmed on the 12,000 ft. antiplane of Peru, docu-
ments the story of an American priest, relating to an Aymara In-
dian witch doctor and their desparate views of life and death.
GAMES OF PEACE-with Art Carney, Godfrey Cambridge, Ron
Carey, Bob Dryden is about the U.N. and its peace keeping.
Tough questions and tough answers about United States roles in
the United Nations.
NOON-International Center U of M
EVENING-10 o'clock p.m.
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER-921 Church St.

_

,i

Hang Ten, the different
knit shirt ... the kind you
pull on and forget about
because the comfort and fit are
there naturally ... and you know
you look good. The bare feet
pocket motif assures it.
Yellow, navy, brown, white
polyester/cotton blend
S, M, L sizes $13.

imm

-mm U

Next Year's President of the
Michigan Union Board of Directors
is being selected.

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