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January 12, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-12

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Saturday, January 12, 19 14

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pamp FIVLS

Saudy aur ,1WIlIH I~(A AL

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DocD
outC
By GLORIA JANE SMITH
Doc' Watson and his son Mere.
Now, there's a couple of fellas
who can teach you in a minute
what a gee-tar's s'pozed to sound
like. Or better yet, you can join
them tonight for an entire eve-
ning at King Pleasure as they
complete a three-night engage-
ment in Ann Arbor.
Doc says the music is "what
we feel, what we think they'd1 en-
joy." It's a potpourri of old time
country bl'ies that can find them
both a little "quick and devilish"
with the tune "Momma Don't
Want That Music Played Around
Here," or Doc picking Travis-
style with Merle backing him up
with some flat picking on "Deep
River Blues," or Doc yodeling
on Jimmy Rodgers' "He's in the
Jailhouse Now."
During the gaps between songs,
the blind musician fills in string-
adjusting time with anecdotes in
a real down-home friendly fash-
ion. "I can't put on an act," he
explained when we talked be-
tween sets. "I guess I'm not a

atson trums

Oun tr
very good trouper, but I guess
that's the way it is. Friendliness
is not an act."
Not on stage and not back-
stage, where he shook hands and
smiled to a handful of admireis
who managed their way in his
room . . . a young chap with a
camera who explained "I'm just
a fan of yours" (Doc said, ok,
take a picture) . . . a classical
French horn player who told Doc
how impressed he was with his
genious and genuineness (D o c
said, son, you say things to make
a country boy cry) . . . and a
bamboo flute maker who pre-
sented Doc with a gift of one of
his hand-made instruments.
Born in North Carolina over
fifty years ago, Doc has lived
there all of his life. "Why move
away from the place I love? I
love the countryside." He leaves
the open country of Deep Gap
often enough as it is. "Cities are
too rushed, have too many strang-
ers. A city can be a very lonely
place. I'd rather ba a' home
than on the road. I guess Pm old
fa'hioned."

ARTS

--

Blues
But then, he'd rather play mu-
sic than do anything else - even
if it does mean extensive travel.
Music has been a part of his life
for as long as he can remember.
In school, he was expose] to
classical music in ntsx c apprec-
iation classes. His father played
harmonica and his mother knew
"all the ballads."
As a young child, he found a
harmonica in his stocking every
Christmas. At the age of thir-
teen, his father bought him his
first guitar. "Daddy showed me
a guitar one day and said if I'd
learn how to play a tune on that
thing, then he'd buy me one.
What Daddy didn't know, was
that I'd already learned a few
chords at school. He 9onght me
a twelve dollar Stelb. It play-
ed like a wire fence."
He began to pick up the thum-
strum of Maybelle Carter and
then that of Jimmy Rogers. T-
day he's mastered a skilled styI
of his own.
Professional performing didn't
become a reality for Doe dWt-
son until he was in his late thr-
ties. His income (gleaned from
such tasks as piano tuning) wa
subsidized at that time by St
funds for the handicaoped. It
was the "desire to be indenend-
ent from charity" that hoi-ed
him up on stage at Wabash Col-
lege in- Indiana for his f i, s t
concert performance.
"At the time, I didn't think
there was any market for old
time music and I didn't think I
was that good of .a musician,"
Doc explained. Time has proven
him wrong on both counts.
Two years later, he was joined
by Merle for their debut togeth-
er at the 1968 Berkley festival.
On stage, he took with him a
nickname that he'd had ever
since he was nineteen. "T h a t
summer, I was working on a
short handle radio station," he
remembers. "Everyone thought
'Doc' was a good radio name, and
it's stuck ever since."
As for lifestyle, Doc says he
doesn't enjoy the "carousing and
other things that go with music.'
Occasionally, he'll have a glass
of wine with dinner. In his spare
time, he likes to tinker around
the house. "For example," he
explained, "the other day I split
firewood and then I oiled the lock
in the bathroom door, and then
. . . I put a new trap in the
kitchen sink."
He enjoys the music of contem-
poraries Pery Como, Glen Camp-
bell, Bill Withers and C a r o 1 e
King. "I love classical, too," he
added. "The Moody Blues, espec-
ially their work with the London
Symphony, are one of my fav-
orites." The list of old time fav-
orites, like Skit Ashley and Jim-
mie Rogers, is endless.
Doc and Merle are now re-
cording artists and appear in
clubs throughout the States, from
one coast to the other. Rarely,
do they tour abroad. In 1968,
they performed in Africa as part
of a cultural exchange program.
"It was like boot camp in the
Army," Doc remembers.
Doc Watson, a genuinely whole-
some and impressively talented
musician, joined by the fine ac-
companiment of Merle Watson:
an experience that shouldn't be

FIRST UNITED METHODIST }
CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
TION-State at Huron and Wash.:
8:30-9:00 a.m.-Communion Serv-'
ice.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Worship
Services.;
9:00-12:30 p.m.--Nursery Care.
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - Church
School (thru Grade 5).I
9:30-10:30 a.m.-Church School
(Grades 6, 7 and 8).
10:30-11:00 a.m.-Coffee-Conver-
sation-Fellowship.
Broadcast on WNRS (1290) AM
and WNRZ (103) FM from 11:00-
12:00.'
* * *
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL

3 c Hu x unday Supper-6:15 p.m.
North Side Presbyterian Church Program-7:00 p.m.
1679 Broadway-across from
Baits Dr., North CampusS
8:30 and 10:00 a.m. - Holy Eu- ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
charist. CHURCH, 306 S. Division
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship. 8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
Child care provided. 10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and
Sermon.
12:00 noon - Canterbury House

UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
isters
Services at 10:30 a.m.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.

Miii-

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders, John.
R. Waser, Brewster H. Gere, Jr.
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Sundays.
Coffee Hour-11:30 a.m. Sundays.!
Supper at 5:00 followed by plan-
ning for a service of worship.
d Bible Study luncheon noon Tues-
days.
Holy Communion 5:15 p.m. Wed-
nesdays.
All college students and young
adults are cordially invited to all
activities of the church.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division
665-0606
Holy Eucharist at Noon in St.
Andrew's Church.
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Church School and Services at
10:30 a.m. - Sermon topic: "The
Sustaining Community."
Adult Forum-9:30 a.m. Discus-
sion topic: "What Has Changed
in the Sheriff's Dept?" Speaker:
Fred Postill, Sheriff.
* *
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
'OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Dr. T. L. Trost, Jr.
Associate Ministers: Dennis R.
Brophy and Howard F. Gebhart.
9 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
10 a.m. - Worship Service and
Church School.

Eucharist.
7:00 p.m. - Evening Prayer in
Chapel.
An Ecumenical Partnership
NORTH SIDE COMMUNITY
CHURCH
929 Barton Dr.
Welcomes University students
wishing to worship in a Christian
family community to join us week-
ly. For additional information,
transportation, call Don Yost, Pas-
tor, 662-6351.

0"%k

thru
dass 'ffed

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN BETHEL A.M.E. CHURCH
CHAPEL (Lutheran Church- John A. Woods, Pastor
Missouri Synod) 900┬░Plum St.
1511 Washtenaw Ave. Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor Church Phone-NO 3-3800
Sunday Morning Services at 9:15 Services:
and at 10:30. Sunday School-9:00 a.m.
Sunday Morning Bible Study at Morning Worship-10:30 a.m.
9:15.
Wednesday Evening Worship at CAMPUS CHAPEL
10:00. 1236 Washtenaw Ave.
(1 Block South of Bus Stop)
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN 10:00 a.m.-Advent Worship Serv-
CHURCH (ALC, LCA) ice.
801 S. Forest at Hill 6:00 p.m.-Candlelight Service.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor Everyone Welcome!
Sunday Morning: A Ministry of the Christian Re-
Study Class-9:15 a.m. formed Church.
Worship Service-10:30 a.m. r d*

Chw'rcu WZ 4hp ii envice4

iiii

People interested in news organization
and operation come to a MASS NEWS
MEETING for radio station WCBN-FM
and WRCN-AM in S.A.B. basement-

f

SUNDAY, JAN. 13, 1974-7:3

CHORAL GROUP
Jewish Music-Secular & Sacred
First Organizational Meeting
Sunday, Jan. 13 at 1 :30 at Hillel
for info. contact ELLEN KATZ
769-9575 or H iLLEL 663-4129
1429 HILL ST.

10 P.M.

--
This Weekend
Barbara Streisand Ryan O'Nei
in Peter Bogdanovich's screwball comedy
What's UDc
7:00 FRIDAY 8:40 SATURDAY 10:20
Modern Languages Auditorium
--COMING--in January-
STEVE McQUEEN ALI McGRAW
FRI., SAT., Jan. 18-19
in Sam Peckinpah's film
The Getaway
-AND-
GODARD
Friday, Jan. 25
WEEKEND
randthe Roiling Stones in
Saturday, Jan. 26
Jane Fonda Yves Montand
Tout Va Bien
and Tom Hayden, Rip Torn
P.M.
with the Jefferson Airplane
all in the weekend film festival
$1 25 cont friends of newsreel 769-7353
Join The Daily Ad Staff
Phone 764-0558

I I

CAMP WISE
The Resident Camp of the
Jewish Community Center of Cleveland, Ohio
Is Now Hiring Counselors and Specialists
for the 1974 Season
A Representative of CAMP WISE
Will Conduct interviews on the Campus
on Tuesday, January 15, 1974
For Further Information, Applications, and Interview
Appointments, Please Contact the Planning and Placement
Bureau in the Students Activities Building
I l l .~ ~ ~ - ~ ~ ~ - - - - - - -

I

H atha Yoga
Beginning and Advanced
Classes offered
NEW CLASS BEGINS
JAN. 14
Meeting both
Mondays & Fridays
for further info call
Larry Short-663-9287
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Result

--__= -_

1

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
Strumming those strings

CULTURE CALFUNDAR
FILM-Cinema Guild shows A Night at the Opera at Arch.
Aud at 7, 8:30, 10:15; Cinema II presents Kubrick's Lo-
lita in Aud. A at 7, 9:30.
MUSIC-Comic Opera Guild presents Mozart's Bastien and
Bastienne and Gilbert's Ages Ago in Trueblood Theatre
at 8; Doe Watson and Merle Watson perform at King
Pleasure: the Ark presents Ed Trickett and the Golden
Ring.
DRAMA-PTP presents Twigs at the Power at 3, 8; Native
American Powwow in League Ballroom from 1 til mid-
night.

missed.
Gilbert & Sullivan Society
00
MASS MEETING for IOLANTHEI
---ALL WELCOME___
Q ANDERSON ROOM
MICHIGAN UNION
SUN., JANUARY 13-8 P.M.
, }.C" '._>O<"" ?<?< (> C}C3 > -SM 7 >

/
0
M
t 1zI1

1141

'III

The COMIC OPERA GUILD
presents
OPERETTAS

2

1111

PROJECT COMMUNITY
COURSE
PSYCH. 483 Section 006

MOZART'S
Bastien & Bastienne
W.S. GILBERT'S
AGES AGO
OPENING: Saturday, Jan. 12, 8:00-$2.50

I

I

I

"Hire hin. He's got great legs."
If women thought this way about men they tists, political candidates, professors andc
would be awfully silly. pony presidents, any other viewpoint is r
When men think this way about women ulous.
they're silly, too. Think of it this way. When we nee

Learn about your community through
involvement. 3 credits, weekly semi-
nors, Thursday 1-3.

com-
idic-
d all

I 1

I

.t

i

11

H

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