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February 27, 1974 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-27

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T'NE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, February z r, t J-r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY - Wednesday, February zi, ,~'i-~

r

I

0

COLLEGE JUNIOR
PROGRAM FOR GIRLS
Attend the college of your
choice. Receive over $500
per month for your senior
year. Apply during your
junior year.
Serve as an Army Officer
(only 2 years).
For details contact:
Lt. Carla L.B. Proeopio
WAC Selection Officer
U.S. Army Recruiting--
Main Station
428 Clinton St.
Detroit, Michigan 48226
CALL: 964-3619 or 964-3748

Revealing the facts
about Joan College
(Continued from Page 1) is more "service oriented."
$20,000 and $24,000, the highest of Despite the fact that dormitory.
any state university in the coun- requirements were dropped in
try, according to a study done by 1969, 95 per cent of all freshpeo-
UCLA and the Cooperative Institu- ple still choose to live in dorms.
tional Research Program of the In addition, some 44 per cent of
American Council on Education. the sophomores and upperclass-
NEARLY ONE-THIRD of the people opt to live in residence
class of '77 expects to receive halls.
$2,000 to $4,000 annually from par- SOME OBSERVERS have com-
ents, as compared with 23.2 per pared the present lack of a cam-
cent nationally. pus activity to the quiescence of
Nearly 4,500 freshpeople are ac- the 1950's, but psychology Prof.
cepted each year of whom 3,000 Richard Mann disagrees, attribut-
enter LSA, a figure which has re- ing the lack of action to cynicism
mained constant since the mid about change among students..
1960's. Luther Buchele, executive secre-
Student programs are changing, tary of the Inter-Cooperative Coun-
however. In the 1960's liberal arts cil, believes students today are
were popular, but now the empha- more introspective than previously.
sis has shifted to the health sci- They seek personal gratification
ences. Sjogren claims the reason and have "nothing to do with
for the shift is that today's student things around them," he claims.
Buchele believes students suffer
t from academic pressure and worry
R A E about the tough job market.

(Continued froin Page 1)
Davidson insists that in the fu-
ture, he will not sell the furs of
any animal that is on the Engan-
gered Species List of the Depart-
ment of the Interior, a list of rare
animals whose slaughter, sale, or
importation are prohibited by fed-
eral law.
At this time, the list names three
of the some 24 subspecies of Canis
lupus as endangered, but the pro-
hibition is not commonly enforced.
I. SPEIWAK and Sons are now
using coyote fur where they used
to use wolf, according to Robert
Speiwak, treasurer for the firm.
Fund for Animals has objected
to the use of coyote fur on the
grounds that coyotes too are ap-
proaching endangered status.
According to prosecuting attor-
ney Frank Stuart Freeman of the
state Attorney General's Environ-
mental Division, the procedure fol-
lowed after the office has received
a verifiable complaint about an
endangered species law violation,
is to first "tell the store nicely
that they are in violation of the
law.
"IF THEN they don't comply,"I
Freeman says, "we send them a
nasty letter, and if they still don't
comply, we undergo court proceed-
ings to prohibit the store from
continuing to sell the item."
Proceedings a r e complicated,
however, Freeman says, by the
difficulty of determining whether
the furs in question are actually
wolf.
"Several of the firms advertis-
ing 'wolf' are actually selling
'coyote'," says Freeman. "These
cases are then turned over to the
Consumer Protection division."
In a recent court proceeding;

against J. L. Hidson's, attorneys, Professors Archibald Cowan and
for both the state and the company Dale McCullough express the belief
found that the majority of the furs that wolves, while practically non-
labelled as "wolf" turqed out to be existent in the lower 48 states of
coycote on inspection. the U.S., are not currently in any
d a n g e r of extinction in either
THE STORE agreed to stop sell- Canada 'or Alaska. According to
ing the disputed items, still main- McCullough, "It's pretty hard to
taining that it was innocent of consider the wolf in Canada an
selling wolf fur, endangered species."
Hudson's was subsequently reim-
bursed for the coats by their New REGENSTEIN SAYS he would
York manufacturer, according to characterize the wolf in Canada as
company attorney John Hand, and "threatened but not endangered.
the coats will be sold in another This is because game controllers
state, where the sale is not illegal. allow the "harvesting" of up to 30
Similar proceedings have been per cent of the wolf population per
pursued with success against two year. This practice is disruptive to
other firms, Hughes, Hatcher and the wolves highly developed social
Suffrin, and Saks Fifth Avenue, organization, says Regenstein. If
Freeman says. the leader is killed, the whole pack
is thrown into disarray."

Local merchants sell wolf fur
over protest, probable illegality

FOREST'

1001 SOUTH FOREST
Fall Rentals
Modern Two-Bedroom Apts.

~i

444
4 4
- F
STUDENTS TO RENTUNIVERSITY TOWERS APTS.
i .
8 mo. lease for
" Fall and Winter
furnished apts.;
Free weekly maid service; 2 blocks from campus; Air Conditioned;
Laundry and Cleaning facilities in bldg.; 24 hour security; Piano
Room; Recreation Room; Study Lounge; Wall to Wall Carpet;
G.E. kitchen appliances; garbage disposal. Also short leases for
Summer Term.
Stop by to see our model opts. today,
or call 761-2680
UNIVERSITY TOWERS
APARTMENTS
536 S. FOREST AT S. UNIVERSITY

4
"
w

fully furnished & carpeted
ecch apt. equipped with its own
burglar alarm system
private parking-free
garbage disposals
24 hr. emergency maintenance service
live in resident manager
Cable TV-free
8 or 12 month lease available

+
!
I
I
I
ii
;

A3 AYH
MEETING
SKIERS--CANOERS
HIKERS--BIKERS
SPIELOMCERS
Come and find out what's
happening.
WED. 8 P.M. FEB. 27
UNION ASSY. HALL
Learn of spring break ski trip
to Afta, End of semester ski
trip to the wonders of the Cana-
dian Rockies, hear of fantastic
up coming canoe trips into the
wilds of Northern Ontario. Talk
to leaders of these adventures.

ALTHOUGH DORIS Dixon, re-
gional director of Fund for Ani-
mals, says- the attorney general's
office hasbeen informed by mail
of wolf fur sales in Ann Arbor,
Freeman claims no letters of com-
plaint concerning city stores have
reached his office.
According to a secretary in Free-
man's office, Dixon's letter could
have been misplaced if it was
addressed only to the attorney gen-
eral's office. and not specifically
to the Environmental Protection
division.
Experts agree that it is not only
possible but historically demon-
strable that man can drive certain
species into extinction by unbridled
mass slaughter for commercial
purposes. According to Lewis Re-
genstein, Washington director of
Fund for. Animals, 500 animal
species have met extinction so far
in this century.
REGENSTEIN SAYS the two
species of North American wolf,
Canis lupus (gray or timber wolf),
and the very scarce Canis niger
(red wolf), are both in danger.
There are currently estimated to
be fewer than 25 of these wolves
left in the entire state of Michigan.
According to the North American
Association for the Preservation of
Predatory Animals, there were
5,000 wolves left in Alaska in 1970,
and the number has dwindled by
1,000 each year since.
H o w e v e r, University wildlife

The Canadian government does
not consider the wolf to be an en-
dangered species in that country.
MOST LOCALLY sold wolf fur
comes from Canada. Coats sold in
The Bivouac are labelled, "Cana-
dian W o 1 f - not an endangered
species."
Neither Regenstein nor Cowman
and McCullough condone issuance
of bounties on the lives of wolves.
Scientists a n d environmentalists
agree that the wolf is not the
dangerous and vicious creature
portrayed in folklore. It is more
accurately characterized as a shy
creature, avoiding c o n t a c t with
humans whenever possible, they
say.
"In one f is c a 1 year-1967-68-
Alaska paid bounties on 1,711
wolves, 718 of which were killed
from airplanes," Regenstein states.
Wolf hunting by airplane involves
flying over a herd-or pack in the
wilds and firing indiscriminately
into the group -with a shotgun.
Later, the hunter returns on a
snowmobile to pick .up the pieces.
In addition to the bounty, which
may be as high as'$200, the hunter
receives roughly $50 to $100 from a
furrier for the pelt.
The issuance of bounties has
since been discontinued in most,
but not all localities.

See Randy or Andy Young
Apt. 211, 769-6374

i

-1
ND,

RA's

SA's

TA's

i
1
'' i
}
' '
Ed
,;
i }
1

Feb. 26

The hills are alivewith-

THE
OF
Winner of

5001'

MUSIC'
4 Academy Awards

Come tothe Fishbowl
GEO will be collecting certification cards to deliver
to the Michigan Employment Relations Commission.
These cards designate GEO as the legal bargaining
agent for all Graduate Academic Employees. By
signing a card you request that MERC administer
an election which will determine whether GEO rep-
resents the bargaining unit of RA's, SA's, and TA's.
If 50% + 1 of all those voting in the election desig-
nate GEO as their official bargaining agent, GEO
will be recognized as a legal union under state law.
Wednesday, Ieb. 27
9 a.m. until 2 p.m.
GEO is delivering the cards to Michigan Employ-
ment Relations Commission in Detroit on Wednes-
day at 3:00 p.m. We will thereby take our first
legal step towards a union and a contract.
Graduate Employees Organization

INCLUDING BEST PICTURE

0

Julie
Andrews

Christoph
Plumme

er
$1.25

I

Filing Open for Rackham
Student Government Positions
POSITIONS OPEN: President, Vice President (must run as slate)
15 Executive Board representatives--2 from Biological and
Health Sciences, 3 from Physical Sciences and Engineering,
3 from Social Sciences, 3 from Humanities, 4 from Education
LENGTH OF TERM: One Year from Election
ELIGIBLE: Any student now enrolled in Rackham School of Gradu-
ate Studies.
FILING DEADLINE: 4:00 P.M. Thursday, March 21, 1974.
How to File: Simply write down your name, address, phone
number, Department or Program, and the office for which
you wish to run. Mail this information to: RSG, 2006 Rackham
Building, University of Michigan OR bring the information to
2006 Rackham during office hours (noon to 4:00 P.M., Mor.
Fri.) before the filing deadline.
PLATFORM: A SHORT platform statement (100 word limit) is
OPTIONAL and may be submitted at the same time.
Date of Election: Mon., March 25 thru Fri., April 5, 1974.
For additional information, call 763-0109 afternoons Mon-
Fri.

MLB AUD. 3

7 and 10 p.m.

I

I

________________________________ --Elm

Dodtletthe price of
a college education
stop you.
The price of a college education is skyrocket-
ing. Fortunately the Air Force had done some-
thing to catch up with it. For the first time, the
6500 Air Force ROTC Scholarships include
the 2-year program, for both men and women.
If you can qualify, the Air Force will pay for
the remainder of your college education. Not
only do ROTC 2-year college scholarships
cover full tuition, but reimbursement for text-
books, lab and incidental fees, as well as a tax- y
free monthly allowance of $100.
To cash in on all this just apply, qualify, and
enroll in the Air Force ROTC at

It's a great way to finish your college educa-
tion in the money, and enjoy a future where
the sky's no limit...as an officer in the Air
Force.

l7.~

I.

I

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