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January 12, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Th'ree'

.... Heath supported on miners wage bat

PIi b1 ThrV e 111V
tle

V

LONDON (Reuter) - W i t h
some of the gloom lifting from
Britain's industrial crisis, Prime
Minister Edward Heath was
cheered yesterday by an opinion
poll showing popular support for
his wage battle with the na-
tion's coal miners.
The poll showed 59 per cent in
favor of the miners accepting a
pay offer which the government
says is the maximum possible
under the anti-inflation rules.
AND 41 PER CENT blamed the
miners for the dispute which
has reduced the country's fuel-
starved industry to a three-day
work week. Only 33 per cent
blamed the government.
More significantly for politi-
cal purposes, the survey conduct-
ed by National Opinion Poll~s
showed Heath's Conservative gov-.-
ernment 3.9 per cent ahead of
the opposition Labor Party in
electoral popularity. This is the
biggest lead enjoyed by the gov-
ernment since it came to power
in 1970.
The figures raised belief in
some quarters that Heath may
press for a snap general election
in coming weeks to cash in on
any popular discontent with un-
ion militancy.
BUT POLITICAL sources insist-
ed it was far from certain that

Heath will decide the tim is ye:
right.
Despite new hopes for a solu-
tion to the miners' wage con-
flict, government minisftars stress-
ed there was still no clear sign
of a formula that couldi per-
suade the men to call off she
damaging overtime ban which
has perilously reduced fuel stocks
oved the past nine weeks.
The latest hopes res ed on an
agreement Thursday night by
Heath to consider a prYosai put
forward by leaders of the Trades
Union Congress (TUC), a body
embracing most of British (rgan-
ized labor.
THE TUC suggested that if the
miners were allowed special
treatment under the controver-
sial stage three of the anti-infla-
tion code, then other unions would
desist from exploiting this to ad-
vance their own wage demands.
Employment Minister William
Whitelaw emphasized in a radio
interview that hopes shuld not
be raised too high. He raid the
government had to stick to its
anti-inflation policy as a safe-
guard against "rip-roariag in-
flation."
Anthony Wedgwood Benn, in-
dustry spokesperson for the op-
position Labor Party, said in a
separate interview he detected
signs of hope in Whitelaw's re-
marks.
BENN NOTED that Whitelaw
avoided stressing the much-used
words "stage three" and instead
concentrated on talking about
"the counter inflation p -ogram."
The inference appeared to be
that the government might, by
some verbal juggling, consider a

settlement which techni Wa'y in-
fringed the stage three rules but
which somehow remainad in the
spirit of the overall anci inflation
code.
The other cause for relief dur-
ing the day was a return to near
normal operations, for the time
being, at least, by the nations

railways. Ever since Dcc 13 the
engineers had been conducting a
slowdown to promote their wage
demands. Traveling, especielly
in London, became a nightmare.
AFTER REACHING a peak
Wednesday, the protest was par-
tially lifted by rail umon lead-

ers on condition the state-run
railway management agrees to
join in pay neg+-iations before
Tuesday.
Without negotiatons, the un-
ions threatened to stage a one-
day strike on Tue ;day and fol-
low up with tougher measures af-
ter that.

Saxbe 'Nixon should provide
own defense for Senate trial'

AP Photo
Fire and ice
A lot full of cars parked between snow banks is silhouetted by flames while a snorkel fire truck, at
left, works at trying to control an apartment complex fire yesterday in West St. Paul, Minnesota. The
fire was caused by an explosion, killing four people.

WASHINGTON (R') -- Atty.
Gen. William Saxbe said yester-
day it would be wrong for the
taxpayers to finance President
Nixon's defense lawyers in the
Senate trial of any impeachment
charges.
Saxbe said he believes "a de-
fense fund" should be estab-
lished if the accusations against
Nixon proceed to that point.
SAXBE MADE his comments
at his first news conference since
becoming head of the Justice De-
partment a week ago.
He said that government law-
years, including those in the Jus-
tice Department, could rightly
be involved in defending the
President at some point prior to
a Senate trial if the House voted
to impeach simply on the basis
that they "don't like him."
He said that politically-moti-
vated impeachment proceedings
attacking Nixon's performance
of duties within his clear author-
ity as President would allow Nix-

$20,000,000 EACH:
Irain to
WASHINGTON (Reuter) - The
Defense Department yesterday
confirmed that the government of
Iran had signed a formal letter
of intent to purchase 30 new so-
phisticated Grumman F-14 fight-
ers from the United States.
Defense Department spokesper-
son, Jerry Friedheim, said stor-
ies saying such an agreement
had been reached are "correct."
FRIEDHEIM also confirmed
that Iran in an unusual move

on to rely of government-paid
lawyers.
"IF ON THE OTHER hand,"
'he continued, "it's based on an
indictment or solid charges of
criminality, then you have
reached the point that it is be-
yond the scope" of his duties as
president, and government law-
yers should take no part in the
defense.
"If it reaches the Senate for
any reason, the Justice Depart-
ment is out of it at that point,"
the attorney general added. "His
defense obviously would be in the
hands of his personal attorneys."
He was asked whether he will
allow three Justice Department
lawyers on loan to the White
House to continue working on
Nixon's defense against Water-
gate charges. He indicated that
he would for the time being but
said they probably would be re-
called at some point during any
impeachment proceedings.
WITHOUT CLEARLY defining
the situation which should com-
pel the President to pay for his
own lawyers, Saxbe said at one
point "there will have to be set
up , an independent defense. I
think there would have to be a
defense fund established."
Saxbe repeated his pledges to
guarantee the independence of
the special Watergate prosecu-
tor Leon Jaworski and said he
has not talked with Jaworski dur-
ing his week in office.
"At any time he wants to talk
to me, he can, but I'm not going
to call him," Saxbe said.

HE SAID IF prosecutors de-
velop evidence against the Presi-
dent, it will be up to Jaworski
and U. S. District Judge John J.
Sirica to determine whether to
present it to a federal grand
jury or to the House committee
considering impeachment.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 85
Saturday, January 12, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan slid
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $7.00 on-local mail ;other
states and foreign).

' buy fighters

from

U..

for a foreign country agreed to
pay a portion of the U.S. de-
velopment cost of the Navy sup-
ersonic fighter.
The letter of intent for t h e
Grumman F-14, which is the lat-
est and most advanced fighter
just now entering the U.S. arsen-
al, is the first contractural step
toward the expected signing of u
full contract in about thirty days,
according to informed military
sources.
Agreement on the letter w i 1I

permit the Navy to begin fund-
ing Grumman for advanced items
needed to produce the 30 Tomcat
fighters, which cost approximate-
ly 20 million dollars each wit'i
support equipment.
THE FIGHTERS, which are de-
signed to defeat enemy aircraft
in air combat, will be equipped
with the Hughes Aircraft Phoenix
Missile System, which is capable
of firing and directing simultan-
eously six missiles at six differ-
ent enemy aircraft.

Wheat export delay announced
by Department of Agriculture

Delivery of the planes to Iran
will begin in January, at the
rate on one or two a month.
Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlevi
indicated his interest in purchas-
ing the F-14 when he visited th,
United Stated last tJuly. T li e
Shah also indicated an interest
in purchasing 50 of the F-15
fighters being developed by Mc-
donnell-Douglas for the Air
Force.
FOLLOWING preliminary dis-
cussions, the Defense Depart--
ment in October prepared a form-
al letter of offer to sell Iran 30
of the F-14 planes.
The purchase of the planes will
be the latest of an already heavy
investment in Iran in U.S. army.
The country hasalready agreed
to buy more than two billion
dollars worth of helicopters,
tanks, ships and other fighters.
Iran, a main supplier of Mid-
dle East oil to the United States,
is considered outside the Arab
orbit of nations, and did not take
part in the October conflict be-
tween Israel and the Arab caun-
tries of Syria and Egypt.

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WASHINGTON MP) - The Agri-
culture Department said yester-
day the Soviet Union has agreed
to delay taking 18.4 million bush-
els of U. S. wheat until after next
summer's harvest. Officials hope
the move will help cool threats of
rising bread prices.
Assistant Secretary of Agricul-
ture Carroll Brunthaver said. he
was "very pleased" by the So-
viet delay in wheat orders. But
he declined to speculate on what
effect it will have on bread
prices.
BAKERS CLAIM bread prices
could soar to as much as one dol-
lar per loaf unless the govern-
ment immediately i m p o s e s
wheat export controls. The Nix-
on administration is opposed to
such curbs.
Brunthaver's comments were
made to reporters following a
department report on export
commitments as of Dec. 28. Ear-
lier this week officials said they
had urged U. S. exporters to de-
lay some deliveries of wheat un-
til after the new harvest is ready
next summer.
Brunthaver said he did not
know whether the Soviet delay
was prompted by department re-
quests to the grain trade. But he
said no other countries had so
far indicated they would post-
pone deliveries.
SHORTLY before the report,
Brunthaver told a food-editors'
conference that no official or in-
formal approaches had been
made by the government to the

Soviet Union. But, he said, if the
report showed some heat left to
be shipped "that we think they
don't need before the new crop's
in we probably would make offic-
ial representations to them."
Despite the shift to next crop
year in Soviet orders, the report
showed total wheat exports for
the year ending June 30 could
exceed 1.2 billion bushels - vir-
tually unchanged from earlier
indications - and leave the U.S.
reserve at its lowest since 1948.
The issue of bread prices has
stirred exchanges between Agri-
culture Secretary Earl Butz and
the bakers. He told the industry
yesterday it "would be an eco-
nomic blunder" to impose wheat
export controls.
IN A LETTER to Bill Meadl,
chairperson of the American
Bakers Association, Butz accused
the industry of "a startling lack
of understanding" in claims
made Wednesday that consumers
might have to pay one dollar for
a 24-oz. loaf of bread if re-
straints are not put on wheat ex-
ports.
"That is preposterous, and in-
tentionally or unintentionally you
launched an irresponsible scare
tactic Wednesday to catch the
headlines and perpetuate a hoax
on consumers," Butz said. Call-
ing it a "calculated move" by
the bakers, Butz said the one
dollar bread price was used as
an excuse to ask for immediate
export controls for wheat.
"IF YOUR organization ac-
tually though wheat prices would

move up to make one dollar
bread by May, bakers would
move into the futures market and
make a killing," Butz said.
To reach one dollar per loaf,
Butz said wheat prices would
have to rise to 33 dollars per
bushel. The price of wheat on the
futures market for May delivery
is about six dollars per bushel,
he said.

25

,-i

Riots in Gujarat claim
ten lives; troops patrol

603 E. Liberty

HENDRIX

AP Photo
Attorney General William Saxbe looks out into the audience after
he finished his first news conference in the Great Hall of the
Justice Department yesterday in Washington. Moments before
Saxbe suggested that President Nixon should secure his own at-
torneys if a Senate trial for impeachment should begin, rather than
use government attorneys from the Justice Department as he is
doing now.

NEW DELHI (Reuter)-Troops
in full battle dress patrolled the
streets of two major cities in the
state of Gujarat yesterday after
rioting over food shortages and
mounting inflation claimed at
least 10 lives.
Officials in Ahmedabad, the
capital of the western Indian
state, said that police this morn-
ing shot dead two people and
wounded four in Visnagar town,
bringing the death toll for two
days of bloody riots to 10. Full de-
tails of casualties were not in.
DESPITE THE troops and a
blanket curfew, officials report-

ed scores of incidents of arson,
looting and other violence in Ah-
medabad and Baroda. Police
used rifles, batons and tear gas
at several places to fight mobs
armed with stones, bricks and
iron bars.
No official estimates were
available of the number injured,
but it was unofficially put at
well over 100.
T H E TROUBLE followed
week-long protests by students
against the spiralling cost of liv-
ing, up 24 per cent in one year,
and the cutting of food rations
because of short supplies.

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