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February 23, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

'Father of bluegrass'
returns to Ann Arbor

World-wide' talent
search for porker

By DOUG ZERNOW
Playing before a packed house
of excited and expectant fans,
Bill Monroe made his long-await-
ed return to Ann Arbor Thursday
night and reaffirmed his title -is
the "father of bluegrass music."
In an outstanding one night stand
at the Pretzel Bell, Monroe and
his "Bluegrass Boys" had the
crowd, which had come from all
over the state, clappng and sing-
ing along from the start.
Following a particularly sharp
set by the Pretzel Bell regulars,
"The R.F.D. Boys," Monroe
strode to the stage with his four-
man backup group and played
and sang the music he helped
make famous, his - strong # tenor
voice and excellent mandohn
playing soothing the sell- o u t
crowd.
Although well into his fifties,
his hair thinning and gray, Mon-
roe stood tall in his greed plaid
suit and cowboy hat, stepped
back at the end of each num-
ber and tipped his hat to r h e
crowd of bluegrass afficionados.
It had been ten years since he'd
last played Ann Arbor, but his
three sets of superb Bluegrass
were well worth the wait.
Monroe and the "Bluegrass
Boys" had the crowd cheering
after a first set which included

such standards as "Nine-Pound
Hammer" and "Kentucky Moun-
tain" and finished with "Swing
Low, Sweet Chariot", with Mon-
roe calling on the audience to
join him.
The song filled the crowded
room with hand clapping a n d
old-fashioned spiritual singing.
Between sets Monroe signed auto-
graphs, greeting old fans and
well wishers with handshakes and
smiles.
For his second set Monroe cal-
led for requests, and he paayed
them all. "Rollin' In My Sweet
Baby's Arms", "In the Pines"
and an especially good rendition
of "Foggy Mountain Breakdown"
with young Jim Morotta on ban-
jo all showed the amazing tight-
ness of Monroe and his quartet
which also included guitar, string
bass and some excellent fiddle
by Kenny Baker. On "Rawhide"
the old master showed off some
superb mandolin, and brought
the crowd to its feet.
There was a myriad of people
at the Pretzel Bell Thursday
night, from students in w > r k
shirts and blue jeans to old c .i-
ples dressed for dining out, but
all had one thing in commcn:
the music. They all loved it.
By his third and final set,

which Monroe ended with the
song they'd been calling for all
night, "Orange Blossom Special,'
the room filled with smiles.
Monroe has been in co'Jntrv
music for well over forty yeers
and with the "Bluegrass Boys"
(which has gone through count-
less personnel changes in t h e
past) has played the Grand Old
Opry since the late Thirties.
"I started playing when I was
eight or nine, my uncle on my
mother's side played mandolin
and he taught me," he said. "I
first went on the radio in N30
and then a short whila later I
invented this bluegrass music."
"This bluegrass music," which
Monroe also termed "the m o s t
copied music in the world today,"
is one of the few art forms solely
based in American history, its
roots going as far back as some
of the family lineages in the hills
of Tennessee.
As the band finished tie night
with "Lonesome Road Blues"
much of the audience moved up
to the stage to shake hands or:
just say hello to the man many
had listened to all their lives. As.
one familiar face at the bar said
"it was a night to remember."
And it surely was.
Hologases,
in classes,

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) - Now
there's a "world-wide" talent
hunt for a pig.
Producer George Pal, the
self-same man who conducted an
exhaustive search for an actor
to play "Doc Savage" - only to
end up signing ex-Tarzan Ron
Ely for the role - now is beat-
ing the bushes for a porker.
The prospect can't be just any
old slob of a pig.
This particular ham must be
small, photogenic and able to
take direction.
A spokesman for the produc-
tion company, a weird individu-
al often given the job of secur-
ing animals for motion pictures,
said no particular breed is be-
ing sought for the role.
"It's a matter of individual-
ity and personality," said the
man, chewing on a cigar with all
the flair he could muster.
"Let's say he should have a
perky personality and a pleasant-
sounding oink. But don't get me
wrong when I said 'he.' Warner
Bros. is not a sexist organiza-
tion. We don't discriminate. This
could be a female pig."
Reminded that female pigs are
commonly called sows, the man
said the term was an affront to
feminity.
The pig chosen for the role
will be directed by Michael An-
derson in "Doc Savage ... Man
of Bronze" and provide comedy
relief from time to time.
"The script calls for the pig
to be the pampered pet of one
of the starring characters in the
movie," said producer Pal. "It
must be small enough to be
carried in a large pocket and
have a melodious oink.
"It can be of any breed or
mixture. We are not necessarily
looking for an animal with a long
pedigree."
It While the pig may hobnob with
y the stars and almost certainly

will be nomirated for a PATSY
award --the prize given each
year to the animal actor who
turns in the best performance-
Pal doubts if the swine will grow
rich from its adventure in films.
The man with the cigar, who
exuded the casual elegance of
Florenz Ziegfeld seeking anoth-
er Billie Burke, said he thought
the studio would buy the parker
outright.
"It smacks of the old salve
contract days at the studios," he
admitted. "But look at it this
way. Suppose the pig had a
smart agent. He could yank the
pig out Hof the picture right in
the middle of things and leave
us high and dry. And with the
meat shortage and all, one can't
be too careful"
M1ATCH.
PUT THE LIFE
OUT OF YOUR MATCHES
BEFORE THEY PUT THE EIRE
qa OUT OF YOUR FORESTS.

Daily Photo by STUART HOLLANDER

Bill Monroe

could

be

used

I

If the combined efforts of a
music professor and two electri-
cal engineers at the University
are successful, new educational
tools using holography - com-
monly known as lensless, three-
dimensional photography - may
soon be available to teachers and
students around the country.
Working together to produce
the devices are music Prof. Wil-
liam P. Malm, director of the
project; Juris Upatnieks, adjunct
associate professor of electrical
and computer engineering, and
Emmett N. Leith, professor of
electrical engineering.
Leith and Upatneiks began the
modern revolution in practical
holography when they developed
a system, publicly announced in
1964, which produced holograms
of extremely high quality.
"Our project has two pri-
mary goals," Malm notes. The
first is to design and build a
viewing device for hologram
film strips for use in libraries.
Working somewhat like a micro-
film viewer, it would give three-
dimensional images of the origi-
nal object.
The second goal is for a pro-
jector which, using the same
hologram film, shows two - di-
mensional images of the object
on a large screen in the class-
room.
Its images would be much like
those from ordinary photo slides,

but as the hologram film is mov-
ed, either laterally or vertical-
ly, the projected image would
show the corresponding perspec-
tive of the original object.
The hologram film, in both
cases, would allow the object
to be viewed from all sides.
''I"lography is the on 1 y
known method of producing per-
fect and realistic three - dimen-
sional images," Malm continues.
"The image presented to the
viewer is exactly like that of the
original object in a display
case."
MAlm emphasizes that such
realism can play as important a
role in magnitude as the inven-
tion of the microfilm reader for
research and the use of record-
ings in the teaching of music.
"The unique properties of holo-
graphy have been appreciated in
science and industry for years,"
Malm says. "Now they can be
applied in the educational field
as well.'
Can Hieronymus Merkin
ever forget Mercy Humppe
and find true happiness?
RATED "X"
Star: ANTHONY NEWLEY
and CONNIE KRESKI
FRI. AND SAT.
8 &10 pm.
COUZENS CAFETERIA
Couzens Film Coop

3rofs
The project is made p
by an $85,000 Exxon Edu
Foundation grant.
Malm says the Unive
famous Stearns Collecti
Musical Instruments won
used to evaluate the educe
usefulness of the holog
tools as they are develop
Leith and Upatnieks.
"Like a complete hologr
musical instrument is a
dimensional object," the
fessor explains. "But throe
the history of the studyc
sical instruments, teacher
students have depended p

report
ssible ily on recordings and books. 1
ication has been impossible for ever
University regardless of size, t
rsity's have every instrument from a
on of parts of the world."
ild be Noting that conventional ph
ational tographs do not convey an in
raphic struments' true proportions an
ied by important points of construction
Malin points out that those fem
am, a places able to amass rare spec
total- mens dare not lend them to othe
pro- institutions because of their fra
uo mu- gility. Often these instrument
rs and can crack or decay when sub
rimar- jected to difference of climate.

to
41
o-
n-
d
n,
w
i-
3r
a-
ts
b-

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
presents
A PULITZER PRIZE DRAMA
by WILLIAM ALFRED
WEDNESDAY through SATURDAY evenng
MEN DELSSOH N THEATRE
TICKETS: $3.00!
Call: 763-1085-10 a.m.-5 p.m.

'U' Music Prof. William P. Malm holds a Halayasian rehab, a rare
instrument made from wood and goatskin. As a test of their edu-
cational usefulness, experimental holographic devices will be used
to capture the qualities of rare instruments belonging to the
'U's' Stearns Collection.

FIFTI4 FIJNI
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR
761-9700
Youve been BLACULA-RIZED and
SUPERFLY-ED-but now you're gonna be
glorified and filled-with-pride .,
when you see
"Fl V6o.1THO
A }}
BLACKLHUalD
Snn
PG UnfwAn iruw
NOW SHOWING
MON.-THURS. 7:00-9:00
FRI.-SUN. 6:00,8:00-10:00
SAT., SUN., & WED. at 2" p Ive rsi
1,3,5,7,& 9
MON., TUES. at 7 & 9 ONLY
ieobert
Redford
Jerevmiah
Jlohn on'
A SYDNEY PO.%6( FILM
The man'
who became a legend.
The film
destined to be a classic!
Panavisions Technicolort celebratng Warner 81o5 50th Annierary
A Warner Communication's Company

TONIGHT!
mediatrics presents
"THE NEW YORK EROTIC
FILM FESTIVAL" (X)
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Feb. 21, 22, 23
3 shows each night 7:00, 8:45 & 10:15 pm.
/
Natural Science Auditorium
ADMISSION $1.00,

Join The Daily Staff

. ,^
..
., .. :. ...: i pp

- I I

AL

CHAPLIN
three previously unavailable
shorts, all prints in mint con-
dition, with Chaplin's original
musical score.
A DOG'S LIFE (1918)

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 665-6290 PG t OPEN 12:45

11

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SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

11

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Eh -!s


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