100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1974 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

=heads or tales
_ Marc Feldman

Dekers

cha

When cagers foul out

. . .

... so does the game

NOTHING CAN RUIN a good basketball game like foul trouble.
A whistlehere, a whistle there and before you know it,
the starters are either on the bench or playing "careful" defense,
or a second-stringer is running around trying desperately to hold
the fort.
None of these are very pleasing alternatives. Presently, a
player is allowed 5 fouls in a 32 minute high school game, an
equal number in a 40 minute college game, and 6 fouls in a 48
minute National National Basketball Association contest.
In other words, collegiate and pro players are allowed one
foul for every 8 minutes of play (40/5 and 48/6) and the high
school player, one for every 6.4 minutes. Since lowering the
high school limit to four in order to make the 1:8 ratio perfect
would never work, the only solution to the problem of excessive
disqualification in the college game is to raise the foul limit to
six, the same as the NBA.
Some may say that the brand of basketball played in the
NBA is so rough and physical when compared to the "sissy"
college game that the NBA limit should be raised. I don't buy
that. The play may be rougher in the pro leagues, but an NBA
player usually has to draw blood or break a bone to warrant
a foul while placement of a hand on an opposing player's arm
for more than a second will draw a foul from the average
collegiate referee.
The main advantage the NBA has over the college game is
depth. At the NBA level, most of the players can perform quite
admirably when given the chance. They are no liability when
inserted in the lineup.
Don.Adams and George Trapp of the Detroit Pistons didn't
exactly burn up the NBA when they were with the Atlanta Hawks,
but with the opportunity to play regularly in Detroit, forward
Adams has developed into a defensive stalwart, and Trapp, into
a high-scoring reserve.
FOULS ARE ESPECIALLY oppressive in the college game
because there just aren't that many good players on average
or even good college teams to compensate when the starters begin
raising their hands too often.
Of course, this rule has exceptions. UCLA presently has high-
school All-Americans like Andre McCarter and Richard Washing-
ton sitting on the bench in case of emergency. North Carolina
Coach Hugh Sloan drove scorekeepers and opponents crazy a
few years ago by alternating three complete quintets each game,
and he won the NIT.
Alas, such cases are few and far between. Most college teams
have a couple of very good players, a few good ones, and a list
of names to fill out the roster. Therefore, the starting five of a
college cage squad will usually remain on the court for as great
a percentage of the game as it can while in the NBA the rigors
of the 82 game schedule prevent this practice even in the playoffs.
The Pistons, for example, rest their entire starting lineup
. for a large part of the second quarter in every game, allowing
the reserves to keep them in the game until halftime. Since
most NBA clubs follow this style it seems to me that per-
mitting each player one more foul just because the game is
loger, is not valid reasoning.
If only total foul figures were considered, it would appear
that basing fouling-out rules on the length of the game might be
justified. According to the most recent NBA stats, the average
NBA team commits 25 fouls per game. This compares quite
nicely with the 20.3 fouls per game average in the Big Ten.
Twenty-five fouls in 48 minutes in the NBA is almost exactly
equivalent with 20.3 in 40 collegiate minutes.
THE REAL DISPARITY between the pro and college game is
seen in the disqualifications stats, and this is the major reason
a rule change is necessary at the college level. The NBA stat
sheet indicates that the lowly Phoenix Suns lead the league in
this dubious category with 34 disqualifications while the New York
Knicks are last with nine. Each team had played about 60 games
to that date.
The average for the entire 17-team league is 20 per team or
about one disqualification per three games played.
The Big Ten stats on this subject tell an entirely different
story. Every team in the league has a greater fouling-out ratio
than the NBA average, and Michigan, for example, leads the
Big Ten with 23 disqualifications in 20 games. Here is a represen-
tative sample of the Big Ten foul-out stats:

By ROGER ROSSITER
SOUTH BEND - Two weeks
ago, the Michigan Wolverines had
their backs to the wall, desper-
ately fighting to gain a berth in
the Western Collegiat Hockey
Association post-season playoffs.
Tonight, however, when the
Maize and Blue invade Notre
Dame's sparkling Athletic Convo-
cation Center here, the shoe will
be on the other foot. Entering
last weekend's play, the Fight-
ing Irish were deadlocked with
the Wolverines and Colorado Col-
lege for seventh place, knowing
full well that only two of the
three would likely make the play-
offs.
A double loss at Minnesota last
weekend, coupled with Michi-
gan's sweep of Colorado Col-
lege,.now finds the Irish dead-
locked with the Tigers for that
eighth and final spot.
Irish coach Lefty Smith knows
how important this weekend's
games are. The Irish simply must
win. "This is our last home ser-
ies of the year, and if we lose
now we're in trouble," S m i t h
correctly summarized.
SHOULD THE Irish finish tied
with Colorado for that eighth
spot, the Tigers would get the
playoff bid because of their two-
game sweep over Notre Dame in
their only meeting a few weeks
ago.
The Wolverines, on the other
hand, need only any combination
of two Michigan wins and two
Notre Dame or Colorado College
losses to assure themselves of
no worse than an eighth place fin-
ish.
"Michigan is a much improved
team," offered Smith, "wd

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
CLARKE COGSDILL
they're hot."
Now ranked tenth nationally,
the Wolverines are not even wor-
ried about making the playoffs.
With a four game win streak in
hand, visions of a possible fourth
place finish and a home ice ad-
vantage in the first round of the
playoffs are getting a lot more
attention.
ONE OF THE big reasons for
Michigan's metamorphosis in re-
cent weeks has been the solidifi-
cation of the forward line com-
binations, an area which coach
Dan Farrell admitted early in
the season would prove trouble-
some.
Early in the season Farrel had
been using four forward hires,
but throughout the winning streak
he has used only three. All three
have been performing mag'if:-
cently.
"When Doug Lindskog was fin-
ally ready to play again, (he
broke a finger New Year's Eve),
I had to figure out where to
put him," Farrell recalled. "I
remembered he had played well
with Angie (Moretto) in the holi-
day tournament so I took a
chance and put him with Angie
and Randy Neal." The three-
some has been Michigan's most
consistent line ever since.

lien ge
The second line originally in-
cluded Don Fardig, Frank Wrn-
er, and Pat Hughes, but a brok-
en ankle to Werner required
Bob Falconer's insertion in Wero.-
er's left wing slot. Fardig has
been among the Wolverines' top
three scorers all year, w h i l e
Falconer and Hughes are tih e
only Wolverines to score f o u r
goals in one game this season.
The trio had their finest hour
last Saturday night when Hughes
amassed his four goals and Fal-
coner scored on a breakaway.
THE THIRD UNIT, Farrell's
"checking line," has former
winger Gary Kardos centering
for Don Dufek on the left and
Kris Manery on the right.
"I decided to move Gary to
center to take advantage of his
puckhandling albility," Farrell
said. The switch moved Manery
to right wing where he has had
more of an opportunity to take
advantage of his great speed.
Farrell will likely match t Ih e
Dufek-Kardos-Manery combina-
tion against Notre Dame's high
scoring line of Ray Dei.orenzi,

Irish
Eddie Bumbacco, and Ian Wil-
liams. The results should be in.
teresting in light of their suc-
ces the past two weekends
against Michigan Tech's a n d
Colorado College's one lines.
The goaltending match-ups will
find the Wolverines' diminutive
Robbie Moore in the nets against
Notre Dame's Mark Kronholm.
Moore has to be considered the
better of the two even though
his goals against average is only
marginally less than Kronholm's.
Kronholm's only shutout t n i s
year came at the Wolverines' ex-
pense last December, one point
the Wolverines will likely n o t
forget.
TWO VICTORIES this week-
end could move the Wolverines
into a tie with idle Michigan
State for fourth or fifth place,
pending the outcome of Wiscon-
sin's visit to North Dakota.
"This is the only league around
where you can get hot far five
to six weeks and end us as
champions," Farrell posited. The
way things have been going late-
ly he could be right. Mayne.

OPEN HOUSE - SATURDAY at
FOREST TERRAC
1001 SOUTH FOREST
FalIl Rentals

Modern Two-Bedroom Ap
* fully furnished & carpeted
i each apt. equipped with its own
burglar alarm system
! private parking-free
* garbage disposals
@ 24 hr. emergency maintenance service
" live in resident manager
r Cable TV-free
*8 or 12 month lease available
See Randy or Andy Young
Apt. 211, 769-6374

Page Seven
E
ts.
r

TEMPLE BETH EMETH

PRESENTS
3rd Annual Book Sale
Sunday, February 24
Hillel Social Hall
1429 HILL ST.
10 a.m.-4 p.m.

r
i

'U r +x "^:"rr "r*? rr. r +r. r T+ r.."

F vllM v !w *w*OTo mcc

Thinclads host meet:
last test till Big Tens
By MARCIA MERKER the Wolverines' fastest two-miler,
Next weekend is the Big Ten Keith Brown.
Indoor Track Championship. The Michigan's mile relay team of
Michigan thinclads have one im- Jim Howe, Jeff McLeod, Wil-
portant meet each season and this liams and Rowe have a definite
is it. Today's Michigan Relays will edge in that event since East-
be a low key preparation before ern's bulwark, Stan Vinson, is
next week's pressure at Michigan vying in New York for a position
State. on the AAU team visiting the
"We had the option of running a USSR.
dual, meetor'hosting the relav Two long distance runners. Jon

EVERY
NEW--BEST SELLING-CHEAP
PAPERBACK-MIDDLE-AGED
EXPENSIVE--RETI RED--OLD
HARDCORE-CLOTH-REFERENCE
IBOOK
N THE STORE-ON THE TABLE
UNDER THE COUNTER
OFF THE WALL-BEHIND THE DOOR
ISi
WAS--STILL-YET
ALWAYS-SOON-NEW
RECENTLY--ETERNALLY
ON SALE
TODAY-SUNDAY-FRIDAY
WEDNESDAY'-PLUTERDAY
YESTERDAY-TUESDAY
at CENTICORE
336 MAYNARD

this year and we chose the relays
for three reasons: the runners will
keep a fresh point of view for next
week, tension will build for the Big
Tens and we won't have the fa-
tigue or traveling away for a meet'
this weekend," explained Coach
Dixon Farmer.
"The runners will also have a
chance to run in different events
than they will next week. In this'
way they will stay up for next
week," Farmer continued.
Dave Williams and co-captain
Kim Rowe will switch events
with the former taking the 440
and Rowe the 600. Williams has
been running the 600 all season,
usually against Big Ten Champ
Bob Cassleman. That's continu-
ous pressure, so today's change
of pace should keep him "up" for
the Big Tens and Cassleman
once again.
Andy Johnson and Mills will also
rotate events. Freshman Johnson,
marked by his giant stride, will
run' the 880 and Mills, the 1000.
In the long distance events, the
two-mile highlights the field with
three of Eastern's men, Scott Hub-
bard, Nick Ellis and Gordon Minty,
working for NCAA qualifying
times. Michigan's cross country
runner Greg Meyers competes
against the field.
Ellis placed first in the three
mile at the prestigious Michigan
State Relays in 13:40.3. He also
clocked an 8:59.5 for second place
at the Michigan Relays' two-mile.
This was 10.5 seconds faster than
WCHA Standings

Cross and Bill Bolster, have been
in the infirmary this week with
the flu. Cross will not compete to-
day and Bolster is doubtful.
Wolverines Steve Adams and
Mike Lantry are pitted against
each other for competition today
in the shot put. Jesse Myers and
Abe Butler compete in the high
and triple jumps, respectively.
Terry Hart and Ed Kulka will try
to break their career best of 15-0
in the pole vault.
The meet today has no pressure
or tension-just a warm-up forI
March 1 and 2 at East Lansing.-
The meet begins around 6:30 at
Bowens Fieldhouse, Ypsilanti.
Rubin fixes
trip plans for'
m-at tourney
"I don't think Michigan wrestling
gets nearly enough support,"
thinks third-year law student Mike
Rubin, and he's trying to do some-
thing about it.
The number-one Maize and Blue
will visit relatively-nearby North-
western for the Big Ten Cham-
pionships on March 1 and 2-right
at the start of Spring Break-and
Rubin wants to make sure as many
Michigan people show up as pos-
sible.
People who can provide rides to
the meet, or anyone who would
like to go but needs a ride, should
contact Rubin at 971-7817, anytime
after 5 in the afternoon.
Rat-tail and first-round matches
will begin in the Wildcats' McGaw
Hall at 1:00 p.m. on March 1.
Semifinal and consolation matches
will be held at 7:30 that evening,
and wrestle-offs for the conference
championships and third and
fourth places will be held on March
2, at 1:00 p.m.

Daily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB
MICHIGAN FORWARD Pat Hughes (8) fires in one of his four
goals against Colorado College last Saturday. Hughes and the
rest of the Wolverine icers travel to Notre Dame this weekend.
with good chances of clinching a playoff berth.
Dewey Lecture Series
The Department of Philosophy
Presents a PUBLIC LECTURE
DEWEY'S Philosophy of Art and
Its Significance Today
by
PROF. MONROE C. BEARDSLEY
Temple University
FRIDAY, FEB. 22-4 P.M.
Rackham Amphitheater

:%:1 J' '{% J: :'.' ' " .' ,,tea:' { ;r
r': "Y,{""r{ ,. :tit, }}rv,''rv "":;

Techincs
,,_ by Panasonic

Michigan
Minnesota
MSU
Purdue
Northwestern
Wisconsin

No. Games
20
19
20
22
20
18

No. Disq.
23
18
13
18
9
7

I

Fouls and the concept of punishment for too many fouls are
an integral part of basketball and should be preserved, contrary
to the ABA rule of rewarding bonus free throws after a player
has committed a certain quota of fouls.
Although they are important, fouls should not dominate
basketball games-dribbling, shooting, passing, and rebounding
are the assets that make basketball a great game.
Changing the foul limit from five to six isn't a radical change
by any means. It should be done.

Mich. Tech
Minnesota
Denver
MSU
Wisconsin
MICHIGAN
Minn-Duluth
Colorado Col.
Notre Dame
North Dakota

W
17
13
14
13
10
11
10
9
9
7

L
8
7
10
12
9
12
13
14
14
17

T
2
4
2
1
S
1
1
1
1
0

Pts.
36
30
30
27
25
23
21
19
19
14

SCORtE S
IfI
NBA
Golden State 122, Cleveland 103
Buffalo 119, New York 97
NHL
Atlanta 4, Buffalo 4 (tie)
ABA
Memphis 111, Denver 106
San Antonio 123, Utah 102
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Drake 95, Memphis St. 86
M arquette 73, Manhattan 59
9
i~eri~$

lV mediatrics presents
"THE NEW YORK EROTIC
FILM FESTIVAL" (X)t

i

If you're looking for the best 'State of the Art'
turntable then the SL-1200 is for you. This turn-
table features an ultra-low speed DC brushless
motor and a revolutionary direct drive system.
This means no belts, idlers, or
other reduction mechanisms.
What you do get though are
features like strobe light
E" speed control, damped cue-
ing, variable pitch controls,
anti-skating, and a detach-
able, hinged dusttcover.
The best part is the price!
It's only $269.95! And it's

University Towers
Apartments offers
Eight month leases
" Free weekly housekeeping
SC+j.... .,,....

I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan