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February 17, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 17, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, February 17, 1974

- , - - - - a olMdmWlN

Indiana

Green

BY GEORGE!
George Hastings -
Those gutty Wolverines:
down but not out
BLOOMINGTON
J OHN ORR SHOOK his head and tried to find the words to
descrge the team that had just demolished his squad. "I
thought they were just superb out there today," he finally con-
cluded.
And that's just about all he could have said. For yesterday
afternoon the Indiana Hoosiers were a great basketball team.
They shot well, they rebounded, they ran, and they played de-
fense like the Wolverines have not seen it played against them
this year. -The Hoosiers are now in command of the Big Ten.
Sure, Indiana had a lot of things going for them. The
Hoosiers had their sparkling Assembly Hall packed with a
record crowd of 17,521 screaming fanatics, each of whom
wore some kind of red garment as a symbol of their undy-
ing love of the Hoosiers.
They had their usual tbevy of cheerleaders, pom-porn girls,
and a third group of mini-skirted, corn-fed coeds apparently
there just to stand and squeal. And they had the usual Big Ten
home-club edge from the officials, who dispatched Michigan's
starting guards on some awfully cheap fouls.
But nobody disputed which team was the better one out
there yesterday afternoon. The Hoosiers have been getting
stronger every week, and they hit their peak against Michigan
in the biggest game yet of the Big Ten season.
Steve Green was utterly fantastic, running around and
shooting over the parade of Wolverine defenders who made
attempts to cover him, in a performance that ought to convert
anyone who might have thought that Indiana does not have
any great individual stars.
But the man who indisputably made the difference from
the 73-71 Michigan victory over Indiana in January was a
6-10 freshman center named Kent Benson. Benson, hailed as
the greatest big man ever to play high school basketball in
Indiana, was a real disappointment during the first part
of the year. His statistics were undistinguished, and Indiana
coach Bob Knight did not bother to bring him off the bench
even once in the first game against the Wolverines.
But yesterday, Benson was everything Knight had dreamed
about and the rest of the Big Ten had feared. In the first half
he dominated the middle, hauling down 10 rebounds, while
bulldozing in 14 points, and displaying the kind of versatility
that can make a big man impossible to stop.
When Michigan's C.P. Kupec attempted to guard him from
behind, Benson was able to go around or over Kupec for baskets.
When the Michigan center tried to front him, he turned and
went to the offensive boards for tip-ins when his teammates
missed. Benson seems to be the player the Indiana team lacked
earlier in the season, the man who could make them a truly
great team.
Of course, Indiana was not the only team on the court at
Bloomington. The Wolverines did not go down without a fight,
and not without a few bad breaks. A pair of missed layups
and a foolish offensive foul in the first half's final minute cost
them six easy points and ruined their chances of staying close
at the half. They trailed by nine instead of three points, and
that's a big margin for any visiting squad to make up in
Assembly Hall.
Still, the gutty Michigan team did not lose its poise,
and when the Wolverines crawled back to within four points
visions of yet aonther Maize and Blue miracle materialized.
But stripped of their play-making guard, and with no-one
capable of slowing down Green or Benson, the Wolverines
were just not about to win this game.
Orr was gracious and dignified in defeat. Unlike many times
last year, his squad had been beaten by a better team, not by
its own poor attitude.
Even though the Hoosiers seem to have a wide inside
track to the Big Ten title, the Wolverines are not sur-
rendering. "I don't think we'll fold," predicted Orr. "Our
kids are too good to do anything like that."
As the final seconds ticked off, the Hoosiers' fans raised a
chant of "We're number one." They are today, unquestionably.
But weird things can happen in the Big Ten, and Indiana can
be upset just like UCLA.
For Michigan to capture the conference crown is now an
admitted long shot. But it's no more of a long shot than was
the chance back in October that this Wolverine team would be
16-4 on Feb. 17.

folds
(Continued from Page 1)
in the game was costly as play-
making guard Joe Johnson was
lt midway through the rally
with his fifth personal foul.
Russell started the surge with a
20-footer from the right side but
Johnson was whistled for charging
as he scored on the front end of
a four-on-two fast break. Wayman
Britt hit a driving layup and after
a John Laskowski basket, Russell
connected on a three-point play,
and Steve Grote launched a jump
shot to make the score 52-48.
With Johnson banished, Grote
had taken over the play-making
chores, but his tenure in the game
was short-lived also. When Grote
fouled out with over 10 minutes to
play, the Hoosiers led by just
eight points. Coach Johnny Orr
was forced to bring Russell back
into the fray despite his four
Blue Greened
MICHIGAN

Blue

hand

SUNDAY SPOU TS
NIGHT EDITOR: CLARKE COGSDILL

Russell
Britt
Kupec
Grote
Johnson
Rogers
Worrell
White
Ayler
Schinnerer
Johnston
Whitten
TEAM
Totals
Technical:

FG
11-18
11-20
5-13
1-6
3-9
0-0
3-6
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0

FT
s-11
2-2
2-3
1-2
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0

R
11
4
12
11
2
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
2
45

F
4
3
1
5
5
0
3
0
0
21

TP
30
24
12
3
6
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
81

personal fouls, and switched start-
ing forward Britt to an unaccus-
tomed backcourt spot..
At this point, it would have tak-
en a miracle for Michigan to
catch up, and the Wolverines just
didn't have any left. The Hoosiers
ran off eight straight points to
take a 73-57 lead and, for all prac-
tical purposes, bury the depleted
Wolverines. Naturally, Green was
the major culprit as he had a hand
in all four Hoosier buckets, scor-
ing two and assisting on the others.:
I N D I A N A CONTINUED to
pour it on and stretched its lead
to as many as 22 points before
Britt and Russell padded their im-
pressive scoring totals in the final
moments, cutting the margin to
a more respectable 12 points at the
buzzer.
Russell led the Wolverines with
30 points, 15 in each half, and
Britt scored a season-high of 24
markers on 11 of 20 tries from the
floor and a pair of free. throws.
Victorious Coach Bobby Knight
felt his team got it together very
well 'after Michigan had cut the
Hoosier lead to four points early
in the second half.
"For a while there, we were
looking like Chinese bandits"
Knight quipped. "But we turned it
around very well and I'm very
proud of them. But when Michi-
gan's guards got into foul trou-
ble it had to hurt them."

Scott May. In that January game,
Benson, one of the most sought-
after high-school players in the
country last year, languished on
the bench all day and May scored
two points in limited action.
Yesterday, Benson looked like
the "Bill Walton of the Midwest"
that he was touted as being, with
20 points and 15 rebounds, and
May chipped in with 18 markers
and a good defensive effort.
Michigan jumped out to early
6-0 and 10-4 leads before the Hoos-
iers began chipping away with su-
perb shooting from Green and
scoring and board work from
Benson. The Hoosier duo combin-
ed for 35 of Indiana's 44 first half
points, and Benson had 10 re-
bounds.
TRAILING BY SEVEN
points late in the first half, the
Wolverines caught Indiana nap-
ping with 'some aggressive Joe
Johnson ball-hawking but couldn't
convert the steals into points.
Three times in the last two min-
utes of the half Johnson stole the
ball and twice he missed driving
layups. Britt was c-lled the other
time for a moving block. Orr be-
moaned these errors "We needed
some sort of s- -rk at that time,"
he noted, "and perhaps we could
hay turned things around.
"I don't went to take anything
awav from Indiana" Orr empha-
sized. "They were superb. They
made the key plays and we didn't."
Iro-ically for the Wol -erines, this
was the third time in the last four
years thet they walked into As-
sembl, H-1l in first nlace, and
the third time thev w-lked out in
second. Tt's going to take some
good basketball and a lot of luck
to climb to that top notch again.

34-72 13-18
Joe Johnson

INDIANA

Green
May
Benson
Buckner
Ahlfield
Laskowski
Wilkerson
Crews
Abernathy
Morris
Kamstra
Allen
Noort
Smock
TEAM
Totals

FG FT R
17-24 3-5 11
8-16 2-5 6
9-13 2-2 15
2-12 0-0 2
0-1 0-0 1
5-1 4-4 5
0-1 0-0 0
0-1 0.0 0
0-0 0-0 2
0-0 0-0 0
0-0 0-0 0
0-0 0-0 0
0-0 0-0 0
n- n on 2n

F
3
4
5
4
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

TP
37
18
20
4
0
14
0
0
0
0
0
0
a

a-o 0=0u
41-82 11-16

AP Photo

Halftime: Indiana 44, Michi
SCORE BY HALVES
MICHIGAN
Indiana

Joe flies high but Wolverines die

By BRIAN DEMING
A third period flurry of goals,
including freshman Pat Hughes'
third and fourth of the night, helped
Michigan to a 7-4 victory over Colo-
rado College at Yost Ice Arena
last night.
A third period let-down had been
p trade mark of the Wolverines
earlier this season. But in the last
few weeks the Blue dekers hav
won on the strength of third period ;
play. Last night four final period
goals took Michigan from a 4-3
deficit to its fourth win in a row.!
"We h a v e confidence now
which we were lacking before,"
Hughes remarked after the game
featuring outstanding stickhan-
dung and skating on his part
which earned him four goals
and the game's first star.
The 6-0, 180-pound, Toronto na-
tive scored the game's initial goal

at 1:21 in the opening period with the puck
a ten foot shot from the front of crease beh
the net. score of th
Colorado managed to tie the It was a
score at 16:06 when senior :apt:un period beg
Steve Sertich scooped the puck goal that k
past Robbie Moore in a power play Don Dufek
situation. nery shot
Michigan' went back out in eAt 7:04
front at 17:09 when Randy Tru- in front fo
deau slapped a shot from 20 :eet took a def!
that vent untouched into the goal center line
past defenseman Greg Smith and Tiger defer
goalie Dan Griffin. Hughes
The Tigers did not waste much 14:51 with
time coming back. Less than 20 to the lef
seconds later Mike Egan slipped ceiving a
a shot in for the score. Colrodo --
later ended the first period scoring
when a 25-foot shot by Doug Palaz-
zari flew past Rob Palmer and
Moore into the twine, giving the
visitors a 3-2 lead.
Bryan Pye gave Colorado a twoI
goal lead after only 27 seconds had
elapsed in the second stanza. As-
sists came from Palazzari and
Frm
Sertich. Fro
EUGEN
Finding themselves in danger of hind the
letting Colorado pull ahead ?he Bruce Co
Wolverines cleaned up the sloppy ed UCLA
defensive play and stifled the Co'o- ketball de
rado attack. The las
"The two penalties that we to-back g
killed off in the second period Oregon S
made the difference," analyzed spectively
Michigan Coach Dan Farrell, re- the Bruin
ferring to the four minutes of Coldren
shorthanded hockey the Wolver- forwardf
ines endured without allowing a 12 of 14 f
score. This marked a turning ishing v
point of the contest: a Colorado points.
tally would have given the Tigers Meanwf
a decisive three point edge. UCLA ce
But the Wolverines held on and field goal
at 11:57 Hughes scored his second for only7
tally making the score 3-2. While Russell
on his knees amidst the chaos in 12 points,
front of the Colorado ne', the fresh- gon inch
man poked his stick out and slid fired off

h apless
from the right of the
ind Griffin for the final Bengals bumf
he second period.
ill Michigan in the third SCORING BY PERIO
inning with a kowe: play Colorado
kontted the score at 4 4. MICHIGAN
deflected a Kris Ma-
into the twine at 4:27. GOALIE SAVES
the Wolverines went out (CC) Griffin 9
r good as Bob Falconer (M) Moore 11
lected Tiger pass at the FIRST PERIOD
e and flashed past the SCORING:F1.RM-Hughes
nse to toss in the goal. 2. CC-Sertich (Palazarri, L
earned his hat trick at 16:06; 3. M-Trudeau (D.
h a tally from 15 feet 17:09; 4. CC-M. Egan (Hiefi
man) 17:27; 5. CC-Palatar
t of the goal after re- Zupetz) 19:18.
pass from Fox PENALTIES: 1. CC-M. E

0 1 0 MOST SURPRISING to those
2
44 20 93 who watched Michigan hand Indi-
igan 35. ana its lone loss of the Big Ten
S campaign - the 73-71 shocker last
35 46 81 January - was the play of 6-10
44 49 93 center Kent Benson and forward
Tige
conduct) 1:31; 2. M-Natale (tripping)
le 2:28; 3. M-T. Lindskog (delay of
game) 2:47; 4. M.-Fax (tripping) 5:48;
JDs 5. CC-Smith (cross checking) 8:52; 6.
DSM-Manery (interference) 14:58.;
1 2 3 F SECOND PERIOD
3 1 0 4 SCORING: 6. CC-Pye (Palazarri,
2 1 4 7 Sertich) 0:23; 7. M-Hughes (unassisted)
11:57.
PENALTIES: 7. M-T. Lindskog
2 3 tot. (roughing) 2:08; 8. M-Shand (hooking)
19 13 31 6:50.
14 7 32 THIRD PERIOD
SCORING: 8. M-Dufek (Manery,
Shand) 4:27; 9. M-Falconer (Shand,
(Fox) 1:31; Fardig) 7:04; 10. M-Hughes (Falconer,
awson) PP Fox) 14:51; 11. M-Hughes (Fardig,
Lindskog) Falconer) 19:58.
eld, Pretty- PENALTIES: 9. CC-Mitchell (hook-
ri (Sertich, ing) 0:25; 10. CC-Stebe (high sticking)
.4:05; i. CC-Mitchell (tripping) 16:53.
Egan (mis- Attendance: 4,152

Steve Green

GOPHERS GNAW MSU

CAGERS FALL, 48-38:
Stevens leads tankers

By LESLIE RIESTER
Maggie Stevens was named the
Outstanding Swimmer of the Big
Ten women's swim meet yesterday
as she led Michigan to a strong
third place finish at Madison, Wis.
The Wolverines took eight first
places but were edged by Indiana
University for second place. The
Hoosiers failed to capture a first
and still earned 451 points to sneak
past Michigan's 441.
Stevens won the 100-yard butter-
fly (:60.1); the 100-yard freestyle
(:55.1); the 50-yard butterfly
(:27.7); the 200-yard individual
medley (2:19.1) and swam the first
leg of the winning 400-yard medley
relay.
MICHIGAN'S DEBBIE Brebvitz
also had an excellent meet, taking
two firsts and a second. Brebvitz
won the 100-yard individual medley
(1:05.1); the 100-yard breaststroke
(1:13.2); swam second leg for the
victorious 400-yard medley relay
and finished second to Stevens in
the 200-yard individual medley.
The Wolverine 400-yard medley
team of Maggie Stevens, Debbie
Brebvitz, Kathy Knox and Robin
Orr (Johnny's daughter), set a
meet record at 4:18.4.
Michigan's medley relay team
also took the 200-yard event, win-
ning by one-hundredth of a second
in 1:58.5.
Wolverine coach Johanna High
had nothing but praise for her
swimmers. "I think they've done
real well," claimed High. "I'm
really pleased with their perform-
ance."
Uffhil..an h nnr nnl,,1 eimmatrin ;.

at the nationals," noted Coach
High. "S t e v e n s and Brebvitz
should do well, and I'm expecting
good performances from Lisa Pe-
derson and Connie Ortega."
Michigan's diving corps finished
sixth, eighth and thirteenth. Diver
Sue Gottlieb has qualified for the
nationals and will accompany the
Wolverines to Penn State next
month.
Cagers hooped
An ice-cold Michigan women's
basketball team couldn't buy a
bucket yesterday afternoon at
.Crisler Arena, and it fell to
Grand Valley State College, 48-
38.
The Wolverines looked strong!
in the opening minutes- as their
zone and trap press rattled the
tall Laker squad. Michigan's
stingy defense wasn't allowing
Grand Valley even a shot, but
the Wolverines couldn't find
their own basket either, and the
first quarter ended tied 8-8.
IN THE SECOND quarter, the
Lakers' 6-0 center Marvonne
Burggraff came to life, dominat-
ing both the offensive and de-j
fensive boards. The Wolverines
got only one shot each time
down the floor, couldn't sink
them all, and Grand Valley
jumped to a 22-16 halftime lead.
The Wolverines' cold streak
Michigan lost its tallest player
when center Sheryl Szady, play-
ing with a 102 degree tempera-
ture, fouled out early in the
third quarter.
Crn.4,,, V1P d by a , - . ,

gan finally woke up and scramb-
led within six points with just
two minutes remaining.
But the Wolverines' effort fell
short, and the Lakers held on to
preserve the victory. Lydia Sims
had 15 points for Michigan,
Kathy Marijanovich tallied six
and Linda Laird added four. Pat
Baker and Marvonne Burggraff
each flipped in 15 points for
Grand Valley.
Both the Varsity and Reserve
equads travel to Adrian on
Wednesday, February 20 to face
some fast, scrappy Adrian Bull-
dogs.

)ucks
Wire Service Reports
SE, Ore. - Oregon, be-
red-hot shooting of
ldren, handed top-rank-
its second straight bas-
efeat 56-51 yesterday.
t time UCLA lost back-
games was in 1966 at
State and Oregon, re-
y. Oregon last defeated
s four years ago 78-65.
, a 6-foot-8 sophomore
from Goleta, Calif., hit
field goal attempts, fin-
with a career-high 24
hile, the Ducks held
nter Bill Walton to four
ls and three foul shots
11 points.
Lee, who finished with
hit a 15-footer as Ore-
ed ahead 44-43. Coldren
three straight buckets

arrest
and Lee added two more, giving
the Ducks a 52-43 advantage,-
which they never relinquished.
"Oregon played good, but we
didn't think they would shoot as
well from the outside," said
UCLA Coach John Wooden.
"They played well and we just
got beat.
He reiterated his feeling that
the Bruins, now 7-2 in the Pa-
cific-8 Conference, are not as
eager as in past years.
Rodents romp
EAST LANSING -Minnesota's
streaking Gophers upset Big Ten
title-minded Michigan State Sat-
urday afternoon, 56-50, with a
29-point performance by junior
forward Phil Filer.
Michigan State's Mike Robin-
son was held to eight points, the
lowest output of his collegiate
career. Minnesota's conference
scoring leader, Dennis Shaffer,
was limited to six points.
Both teams startedout slug-
gishly in the first half. Nearly
three minutes elapsed before the
first points were scored. The
Gophers successfully slowed
down Michigan State's run-and-
shoot and held onto a 28-26 half-
time lead.

Wal ton
guard Billy McKinney reeled off
30 points Saturday, 14 of them
in a second-half spurt that
boosted Northwestern to an 86-75
come-from-behind Big Ten bas-
ketball win over Illinois.
* * *
Badgers cheesed
WEST LAFAYETTE - Hot-
shooting Purdue, with four start-
ers scoring 18 or more points,
rolled to a 37-point lead in the
first half Saturday and kept its

Gang
Big Ten title hopes alive with a
107-80 victory over Wisconsin.
Forward Frank Kendrick scor-
ed 19 points to lead all scorers,
and John Garrett, Jerry Nichols
and Bruce Parkinson scored 18
points apiece for Purdue.
IOWA CITY -Neil Fegebank's
18-foot jump shot with four sec-
onds remaining gave Iowa of 69-
67 Big Ten Conference basketball
victory over Ohio State Satur-
day night.

Blue gymnasts shine
in upset of Hawkeyles

tepid BueKeye poolmen
Special To The Daily THE TURNING POINT of the ,
COLUMBUS - The Michigan meet came when Michigan's Jose
swimmers fought their way out of Aranha took an unexpected second
a hole to overcome the Ohio State place in the 100-yard freestyle to
Buckeyes 67-56 in a dual meet here start the Maize and Blue on the
yesterday. Coach Gus Stager could comeback trail.
only say, "It was a typical Ohio
State-Michigan matchup with a Michigan swept the 200-yard but-
good-sized partisan crowd making terfly, the 200-yard backstroke, and
for good competition." the 200-yard breaststroke to lock
As expected, the Buckeyes swept the meet up. Tom Szuba, Rob Helt
the diving events to put the Wol- (in a season's best time) and Stu
verines in an early hole. Dick Isaac took firsts in these events.
Quint of Michigan did manage to In what Stager called the best
pull a second place in the one race of the day, Gordon Downie
meter dive for the best Wolverine blew toN a victory in the 500-yard
diving performance of the day. freestyle. Stager noted that "Dow-
nie said he could win it the easy
way or the hard way." Downie
sprinted for 150 yards to blow open
R ES a big lead and so psyched his op-
ponent that he swam to an easy
San Francisco 83, Nevada-Las Vegas 71 five second victory.

:

Special To The Daily
IOWA CITY - Hawkeye fans, still bitter over
their 21-16 loss to Michigan's wrestlers several
weeks back, were looking for revenge yesterday
afternoon when the high-flying Iowa gymnasts
hosted Newt Loken's Wolverines. They didn't
get it. The Maize and Blue put on a fine
performance to throttle the Corn State up-
starts, 161.1-160.8.
"The guys were really fired up for this
one," the jubilant Loken commented after-
ward. "There were some tremendous per-
formances by the gang, especially the spe-
cialists. And we got a great finish by the
high bar men: Bruce Medd, Carie Culbertson,

outclassed Iowa's 25.05 in the event.
Michigan men also did well in the all-
around, placing Bruce Medd second and Jean
Gagnon third behind Iowa's fine Bruce Wald-
man.
The undefeated Wolverines next home appear-
ance will be Monday night, February 25, at
17:30 in Crisler Arena, when they host also-
unbeaten, nationally-ranked Penn State.
Newt's beaut
POMMEL HORSE
MICHIGAN - 26.2: Poynton, 9.1; Hanson, 8.9; Medd,
8.2
Iowa - 25.05: Robbins, 8.75; Siemianowski, 8.75;
Mason, 7.55.
RINGS

Illini Schmidt
EVANSTON -

Freshman

r;;?" :.-'.; . .

':

Sco

NBA
New York 117, Golden State 107
Capital 101, Buffalo 92
NHL
Chicago 4, N.Y. Islanders 0
N.Y. Rangers 9, Vancouver 4
Toronto 7, Atlanta 2
,.i.....l. 'I r m : -,

Virginia 91, Navy 72
Florida 85, Auburn 77
Pittsburgh 91, Youngstown St. 71
Dayton 87, Chattanooga 62
Marquette 69, Loyola Chicago 43
Alabama 77, Mississippi 57
P oenn natmAth 70

STAGER MENTIONED that this
weekend's activities had not led
him to decide who to send to the
Big Ten meet. "We still are un-

i

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