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February 17, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-17

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

PROFILE

Makarskt'
dedica ted

An

in tense

and

young

viollnis t

By MARY LONG
BEHIND MICHAEL Bistrit-
sky's thick black fifocals, his
eyes shine with warmth. He has
played violin with the great or-
chestras of Europe, and now
teaches intensive music theory
classes in Detroit.
On this day, a couple of years
back, he is staring as a promo-
tional piece for an upcoming
chamber music concert, featuring
distinguished virtuosos, members
of the Detroit Symphony, and a
girl of 16 - a girl with enor-
mous round, dark eyes and a
poised, inteligent expression.
"Ah, Makarski!", he whsp-
ers. "She was a student of mine
long ago. Such a violinist! To
hear her play - this girl is so)
extraordinary . .
Michelle Markarski, currently
a School of Music sophomore, has
performed as a soloist with the
World Youth Symphony, the In-
ternational Youth Symphony and
served as concertmaster for the
renowned Interlochen Arts Aca-
demy Orchestra throughout high
school. A participating irtist in
the Marlboro Music Festival, she
toured the country, the youngest
of a highly exclusive and distin-
guished group. She has engaged
in a paper wad battle with Ru-
dolph Serkin and chatted with a
t-shirted Leonard Bernstein.
EN MICHELLE learned of
Bistritsky's comment recent-
ly, her response was characteris-
tically warm, "I love that man,"
she said. "I was playing in the
All-City Orchestra at that time.
He was our conducter and would
say to me, "Michelle, Moart
must be"played like pearls - like
pearls!"'r
The life, however, isn't always
easy.
"You see"' she says, speak-
ing slowly, "Musicians have such
a problem just being human.
They get so wrapped up in them-
selves and then, whenever they
find they need someone else to
turn to, there's no one there.
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"There's a period of time when
you feel you have only acquaint-
ances and no friends at all. And
these acquaintances" sh, sighed,
"they fall all over you . a n d
claim friendship . . bW: when
it comes down to it, they're un-
willing or even afraid."
She pulls a short brown braid
of hair over one shoulder for
a moment. "I suppose it' be-
cause of the lack of time we
spend in social situations" s h e
decided. "You're so busy work-
ing, discipling yourself . .
But then, brightening, s h e
smiled. "That's why chamber
music is so wonderful! You can
play with people you really love.
Its not the 'big anonymous mass
of a symphony orches ra. It's so
intimate. Gustave Rousseels, one
of the Music School p'rofessors,
says that playing in a quartet
with someone is like being mar-
ried to them."

the time. I've always had the
inclination. What I may lack
theoretically, I try to make up
in curiosity.
BUT NOT all her interests
could share priority, a n d
early on Michelle's focus became
clear. She credits her father, a
conservationist and string teach-
er in the Detroit public s.hoof
system, with being "the deciding
influence in my becoming a
musician". He was her f i r s t
teacher and made certain that
her musical education w a s
thorough, insisting on supplemen-
tal piano lessons and regiilor
practice.
"It's pretty common that most
musicians have a fairly abnorni-
al childhood. If they are at all
successful during their youti,
that is. You just don't toddle off
and play a lot. I can remember
children calling for me and my

"You see, musicians have such a
problem just being human. They get so
wrapped up in themselves and then,
whenever they find they need some-
one else to tourn to, there's no one
there."

als and young people. Groups se-
lect their own music. One veter-
an is assigned to each gro-Ip and
he helps us along as a leader
of sorts. It's a learning exper-
ience for all of us though -the
pro benefits from our fresh ideas
as well."
Rudolph Serkin was named ar-
tistic director of Marlboro after
the death of Pablo Casals.
"And that man is so - sly!"
she exclaimed. "At dinner one
of my first niglhts there, I saw
him look carefully around,
scratch his neck so as not to
apear obvious, and then fling a
paper wad at Ron Copes, a xio-
linist from Oberlin who sat next
to me at table. I was no:rified
when I saw Ron wadding up pap-
er to fling back at him. I al-
most shouted at Ron I didn't
know there is a virtual initiation
of paper wads at Marlboro"..
"My life has been filled with
all these older people who have
had tremendous influences ar oth-
er types who were very serious
individuals. I've never been in
contact much with people my
own age until now.
"A MUSICIAN knows so much
earlier what they wan: to
do withdtheir life" Micheile em-
phasized. "They know far a-
head of everyone. You attach
yourself to an instrument and
its forever, a lifelong thing. No
one takes a fifth grader w h o
wants to be a lawyer too ser-
iously, but if a child is a tal-
ented musician, people say, "Yes
-go! Go practice!".
"The student-teacher .elation-
ship makes us quite comfortable
around older people and profes-
sionals. We get used to tyrants.
It must be faced for what it is,
and the music world is a mon-
archy. It's a dictatorship."
Michelle admits Leonard Bern-
stein was "a childhod heio ,
but it was the gen e ce&ist
EASTERN MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY
MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE
PRESENTS
BLACK
SAB BATH
WITH
BEDLAM
SAT., Feb. 23-8 p.m.

Pablo Casals wno mspirea ner
most of all.
"Casals was both a numanitar-
ian and a musician - but a hu-
manitarian foremost. He was
peace loving when all the other
music people were still only con-
cerned with making as much
money as possible, from concert
performances."
Michelle currently itudies with
Professor Paul Makanowitsky.
She leaves her campus apart-
ment before eightin the marn-
mng and stays at the Music
School until "whenever", often
taking yogurt for sue .'
"[HAT I'D like to do is be
able to play in a really
fine chamber music ensemble"
she said. "I want to have enough
of a reputation to give recitals
and. be lucky enough to play con-
certos with orchestras occasion-
ally."
Michelle is charming and mo-
dest in talking about her work.
There is no apparent sense of
hungry, ugly ambition.
"You know, I used to oe pow-
er-hungry once" she said. Tier
face rested in her sleader cup-
per hand. "I would think _- 11
be like Heifetz, I'll be in the
limelight. People everywhere
will hold receptions for me.
"I had this image of myself
in my 20's, flouncing into re-
hearsal". She gestured grandly
about her. "My Mercedes would
be parked at the curb, I'd be
wearing an exquisite Sals gown,
with two Afghan hounds beside
me and a Stradivarius under
my arm".
"Now, I could care less about
the clothes, the Mercedes. All
I could possibly still want from
that vision are the wo ddogs.
What I want is an old house,
someplace where it would be
dead quiet . . . a hausa I could

"It's pretty common that most musicians have a fairly abnormal
childhood. If they are at all successful during their youth, that is. I can
remember children calling for me and my parents telling them I was
practicing and couldn't go outside."

do absolutely anything I wanted
with".
"AND WHEN I think to my-
self: "Michelle, you're in
music, you're going to be in
poverty all your life', somehow
it doesn't bother me anymore".

Mary Long is a staff
for The Daily.

writer

SDT SPAGHETTI DINNER

FEB. 17

5:00-8:00

MICHELLE MISSED the begin-
ning of winter semester
term because of the tour with
the Marlboro Music Festival. "I
have asked myself about dis-
rupting. the flow of my education
like that" she admitted. "I de-
cided that this tour was as im-
portant - or more important-
than day-to-day class work. This
is, after' all, the performance
experience. You have to be on
your toes - there's no choice.
And there is a tremendous chal-
lenge to keep the music from go-
ing stale on you".
Nonetheless -she doesn't fol-
low the pattern of many artists
who know their craft and not
much else.
"I'm not willing to slough off
my studies and be only a violia-
ist" she says emphatically. "I
can't see excluding anything.
love literature. I love animals -
if I weren't a musician; I more
than likely would have become
a veterinarian. And, for exam-
ple, if I were a vet, I'd try to
be as well-versed in the arts as
possible.
"I refused to go to JulLard,
Curtis or to any conservatory for
my undergraduate work. I End
then stagnant environments.'
"Musicians seem to be either
math-science or arts-humanttie3
oriented. Rarely are they both.
I'm art-humanities, I thiak. I
have a lacking in math. The
problem is that I've never had

parents telling them that I was
practicing and couldn't go out-
side."
She' went through the sequence
of Detroilt's finest string teach-
ers and by the age of 12 was
performing with such lo .al or-
chestras as the International
Youth Symphony. She was nam-
ed concertmaster of the Inter-
lochen Arts Academy Orchestra
in her' sophomore year of higi
school.
More recently, Michelle per-
formed in the Marlboro Music
Festival, which, according to one
critic, "has the highest concen-
tration of artistic activity in tne
United States .and possibly the
world."
"YOU PRACTICE in four sep-
arate two hour periods
every day" Michelle explains.
"Intensely, to say the lean.
There's a mixture of profes sion-

$1.75 ticket
Proceeds go to U of M Speech and
Hearing Camp-Shady Trails
1405 HILL

BAGELS FOR BRUNCH BUNCH
PRESENTS
LOXS & BAGEL and
PROF. RAYMOND TANTER
Dept. of Political Science, U of M
Topic: "Israel and oil"'
SUN., Feb. 17, 11 a.m.- HILLEL, 1429 Hill
JOAN MATH EWS
PAINTINGS
Feb. 19 through March 2
at the
UNIONGALLER
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Reception for the artist
Sunday, Feb. 24 from 3-5 p.m
SGalleryHours:ues. through Sat., 10a.m to 5P.m. ,

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GUADALAJARA, MEXICO
F u II y accredited University of
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SCHOOL offers July 1-August 10.
1974 courses in ESL, bilingual edu-
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Tuition $170; room and board in
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write: International Programs. 413
New Psychology, University of Ari-
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Bowen
Fieldimouse

Purpose o
Third World Solildarity
Conference
People of color, the time of our solidarity is here. We must no
longer be apathetic, when our mere existance stands in jeopardy.
There has been a general disorientation and alienation among
minority students in a neglect of the needs and problemrrs of Third
World Students. This University has not, and will not direct itself
to the problems of minority people, until forced to do so. We can
no longer sit and wait for solutions to OUR problems, because the
answers must come from us if they are to fulfill our needs in their
entirety. We must not allow this University to continue to keep
us divided and ignoring each others needs.
WE ARE ALL IN THE SAME BOAT!
The success or failure of our effort rests solely on the unity we
aim to aquire during this conference. You have this opportunity
to come together as the Vanguard against racism and oppression.
Do not under any circumstances allow yourself to miss this oppor-
tunity.

I

TICKETS: $6 reserved
$5, $4 general admission
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