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February 16, 1974 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1974-02-16

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Saturday, February 16, 1974

TH EM I CH 16M DA I LY

Page Seven

Saturday, February 16, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

B ugVS
By GEORGE HASTINGS
Special To The Daily
BLOOMINGTON - In any Big Ten bas-
ketball season, there are. always many "big
games." But what could be the biggest of
them all takes place today at Assembly
Hall, when the Michigan Wolverines take
on the Hoosiers of Indiana..
It is a game that has all the signs of a
super-important clash. Michigan and In-
diana rank as the top two teams in the
conference, with 8-1 and 7-1 records, re- a
spectively. They sport nearly identical
overall marks, 16-3 for Michigan and 15-3
for Indiana. And the winner will take a
big step toward winning the Big Ten title.
Michigan coach John Orr admitted that
this is his team's biggest game yet. "This
game puts the team that wins one game up
in the loss column," he said, "and the per-
centages will be pretty much in that team's
favor to at least tie for the title."
His assistant, Jim Dutcher, was even
more sccinct: "If Indiana gets by us,
they're going to be damn tough to beat."
But, as Orr and the entire Wolverine
team know, Indiana's going to be damn
tough to beat today in their own arena.
The Hoosiers have been playing their
best basketball of the season in recent
weeks, following a yearly pattern at
Bloomington, where the basketball teams
seem topstart slow and get better as the
season progresses.
"They're at the top of their game now,"
says Dutcher, andtwith good reason. Indi-
ana has not lost since it dropped its con-
ference opener to Michigan in Ann Arbor,
sweeping seven Big Ten games since that
time.
And the Hoosiers seemed to reach their
peak only last Monday night as they invad-
ed. Madison, .and smashedtthe Wisconsin
Badgers, right out of the title picture by
a crushing 81-63 score.
Of course, the Wolverines have been
flying high of late, too. Michigan has won
five straight games since its only confer-

Indiana

in

crucial

contes

ence loss to Purdue, and the Wolverines
also own an impressive win over Wiscon-
sin. The game shapes up as a battle of
two hot teams.
In terms of individual statistics, the
Hoosiers do not possess an individual stand
out. Their leading scorer, Steve Green, is
scoring a little less than fifteen points a
game, and no Hoosier averages even six
rebounds a contest.
Compare those to the 22 points-a-game
count of Michigan's Campy Russell, or the
12-per-game rebound average of C. J. Ku-
pec, and you wonder what this Indiana
team really has.
The answer is, of course, that they
have the best balance in the conference,
with nine quality, experienced players
that coach Bob Knight uses to his best
advantage.
The 6-7 Green anchors a fine trio of
Hoosier forwards. Starting next to him
is 6-7 sophomore Scott May, Indiana's sec-
ond top scorer at 11.7. Backing them up
is Bob Wilkerson, an amazingly quick play-
er whose forte is tough defense.
At guard Knight will start Quinn Buckner
and Steve Ahlfield; with Jim Crews playing
a great deal as a backup. Buckner is com-
ing off a fantastic weekend in which he
contributed 19 assists against Illinois and
Wisconsin, as well as canning 17 points
against the Badgers.
Coming in to play either position is Indi-
ana's own version of John Havlicek, 6-5
John Laskowski, who never starts but us-
ually plays most of the game. He aver-
ages 10.7 per contest.
At the beginning of the year, center was
a problem for 'the Hoosiers, but lately it
has been a plus. 6.10 freshman Scott Ben-
son has started the last six Indiana games,
and his improved rebounding has been a
big factor in the Indiana surge/ Tom
Abernethy, at 6-7, is a capable back-up
man.
Adding to the incentive for the home

team today will be the memory of its
early loss to Michigan, a game in which
the Hoosiers were leading by 15 points at
halftime, but were blitzed in the second
half to go down to a 73-71 defeat.
At that point in the season, however,
Benson had not been playing well, and he
sat out the entire game This time around,
his presence may make for a different
type of game. "The big change is that
they'll be running more," says Dutcher, at-
tributing that to the fact that Benson's
presence on the defensive boards helps
Indiana get the ball out and to its breakers
more often.
One facet of the game that should mark
this contest will be defense. "They're the
best defensive team we've faced," ad-
nutted Orr. The statistics bear him out, as
Indiana has allowed its opponents only
60 points-per-game and a 40 per cent shoot-
ing mark.
But Michigan has also been winning
games this year on its defensive strength,
so any points in this contest will have to
be hard-won.
Inevitably in any Big Ten game be-
tween two evenly matched teams, the
home court advantage can tell the dif-
ference. The Hoosiers have a 28-2 home
record in the three years Assembly Hall
has been in existence, losing only to No-
tre Dame in the last two years. On top
of that, Indiana officials expect a record
crowd of 17,500 to jam into the structure
for the purpose of harassing the Wolver-
ines.
But basketball games are won on the
court, not in the stands, and the Michigan
players know thatstheysalmostthave to win
this game to win the Big Ten title. Nobody
outside of Ann Arbor seems to be giving
them much chance today, but considering
what this team has done so far, nobody
should be surprised if John Orr pulls yet
another miracle out of his hat.

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Daily Photo by ROLFE TESSEM
JOE JOHNSON SOARS past Wildcat Willie Williams for a fast
break layup. Little Joe will have the unenviable task of stopping
Quinn Buckner in today's critical battle with the Indiana 'Hoosiers.

Awesome

By FRED UPTON
"No doubt about it. Michigan's
the best," exclaimed Wolverine
mat mentor Rick Bay after his
top-ranked Maize and Blue de-
molished the fourth-rated Wiscon-
sin Badgers 24-9 before close to
3,000 spectators in Crisler Arena
last nit.
"We- felt . we had to beat
Davids' and Huizenga to win,"
mu# DW consiuroath!ane
Klevin and possibly he was
right. Both-won tight, hard-fought
matches against their Badger
opponents, to s'uccessfully close
their careers before the Crisler
Arena aficionados.
Fellow seniors Gary Ernst and
captain Jerry Hubbard also won
their matches, prompting Bay to
remark that "I was very pleased
all our seniors won. And they
all put on a great show."
Hubbard was the most spec-
tacular. The undefeatedWolver-
ine captain had freshman Tom
Grabot nearly pinned . several
times, and his 17-4 superior de-
cision was, if anything, decep-
tively close.
As expected, Davids had a
rougher go at 134 against cheese-
stater Jim Abbott, "Abbott is the
only guy at 134 in the country
who can dunk a basketball,"
Bay noted ,and that's exactly

dlaily
sport
NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN KAHLER
why Davids always has
putting him down. It tool
versal and the riding tim
to secure the Htazel Parkr
triumph.
Rob Huizenga defeated
ing Big Ten 167-pound Ed
by a narrow 3-0 score
which did not accurately
the course of the matc
walk-on from Rochester,
totally baffled the Badg
with his pretzel-form figu
leg holds.
Ernst's victory was the
of the lot. The heavyweigt
Saline let up in the final m
reprieving Badger Glen'
from a superior deciiso
with the meet already d
the 9-0 score was emb
ment enough.
158-pounder Dan Brin
John Ryan at 167 both did

grapplerS
than a lot of people expected. sion setb
Brink held a quality wrestler, consin's
Pat Christenson, to a 1-1 draw, Ten cha
while Ryan fashioned a charac- not enti
teristic escape - plus - riding 2-0 stayedc
whitewash of B a d g e r Frank Horswill
Davies. , suffering
Wolverine Dave Curby, disap- nn a gan
pointed at not being able to face 5-2 deci
Wisconsin's t o u g h 190-pounder "Valle
Laurent Soucie, who stayed home of close
- - with a bruised knee, used his accurat
trouble experience and muscle to maul man fr
k a re- understudy Ron Jeidy by a 9-4 to score
.e point count. Until he
iatie's The only two Wolverine losses
were suffered by Bill Schuck at
defend- 142 and 12-pounder Rich Val-
Vatch ley. chuck's 12-1 superior deci-

smash Badgers

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back at the hands of Wis-
defending 150-pound Big
amp Rich Lawinger was
rely expected, but Valley
close to Badger Craig
throughout the meet,
g a last-second takedown
rmble to drop a deceptive
sion.
y sure has lost a buch
ones," Bay commented
ely, but once again the
om McLean, Va., failed
any success on his feet.
does, he'll probably still

continue to lose the cose ones.
Last night's confrontation was
not important solely as a con-
frontation between the nation's
number-one a n d number-fEur
teams. The results of the match-
es will have a definite bearing
on the seedings for the Big Ten
championships, scheduled f o r
the first week in March at
Evanston, Ill.
"Seeding can win a tourna-
ment for you," Bay cliims,
"even if you don't have as much
talent as some other teams. I

think that Brown (15-1), Hub-
bard (21-0), Davids (19-2-1), Hui-
zenga (19-3) and Curby (19-3)
could all be first seeded with
Ernst (19-4) second seed."
Bay summed it up: "I couldn't
be more proud of this team com-
ing through the way we have.
This is the best team in the
country. We've wrestled most
of the top-ranked teams and
beaten them all. We may come
up flat against another team, but
the way we wrestled tonight,
we're the best."

i

WOMEN FARING WELL

at 177
reflect
h. The
N.Y.,
er ace
ire-four
easiest
bt from
inutes,
Vissers
n, but
lecided,
iarrass-
k and
i better

fond farewell

'p

T1- n o e hti nn re

118-Jim Brown (M) dec. Jim Haines . tq'o& j & 6/ & LG N t u/'WFt.F
(w), 7-2.
126-Craig Horswill (W) dec. Rich
Valley (M), 5-2. By LESLIE RIESTER which swam a 3:41.07 but the real
134-Bill Davids (M) dee. Jim Abbott and MIKE WILSON story was Semchyshen's 48.1
(WV). 3-2.
142-Rich Lawinger (w) sup. dec. Bill As expected, the Michigan clocking of the final leg of the
schuck (M), 12.1. swimmers had an easy time last race. Semchyshen had to come
150-Jerry Hubbard (M) sup. dec. night, drowning tht Gophers of from behind for the Wolverines in
Tomn Grabot (WV), 17-4.c
158-Dan Brink (M) drew Pat Chris- Minnesota, 82-40. the final leg of the race.j
tenson (W), 1-1. However, in view of the light Gordon Downie proved to be a
167-John Ryan (M) dec. Frank Da- competition, the victory was sweet pleasant surprise when he was
vies (W), 2-0.
177-Rob Huizenga (M) dec. Ed and pleasing to see. clocked at 9:45 for the 1000 free-
Vatch (w), 3-0. Highlighting the action was style. This time is the best time
190-Dave Curby (M) dec. Ron Jeidy Michigan's 400 medley team of recorded so far this year for
HWt4ary Ernst (M) dec. Glenn Paul Foster, Brad Brockway, Tom Michigan in this event and it was
Vissers (w), 9-0. Szuba, and Norm Semchyshen the first time Downie had ever

This meet marked the final
home appearance for seven
seniors Stu Issac, Chris Hansen,
Paul Fairman, Jose Aranha, Dick
Quint, Pete Agnew, and Dan
Fishburn on this year's squad.
"That means Michigan, with the
loss of these seniors, will have
to do a great job for rebuilding
next year," Stager praised.....
In the Women's Big Ten Swim
championships, Michigan is cur-
rently in second place behind
Michigan State. The Wolverines are
40 points ahead of Indiana. Shin-
ing for the Blue were Maggie
Stevens, first in the 50 meter
butterfly and first in the 200 meter
individual medley, and Debbie
Brevits who placed second in the
400 meter freestyle.
UN DM(T5I

A NIGHT AT THE MOVIES
WITH THE
MARX BROS, in
HORSEFEATH ERS
and other comedy shorts and cartoons
Movies, Refreshments and laughs all
in the
SOCIAL HALL OF H I LLEL
1429 Hill,
8:30 SAT. NITE
$1.00
The Human Rights Party
Platform Convention
PART II
Saturday, February 16
FROM NOON TO 5
Sunday, February 17
FROM 7 P.M.
Alice Lloyd, Klein Lounge
AGENDA
SATURDAY: Economics
Racism
Energy Crisis
Proportional Representation
SUNDAY: Community Facilities and
Child Care
For more information stop by or call the HRP Office-761-6650
WOMEN'S CAUCUS-Thurs., March 21,7:30
1028 Church

PLAYOFF HOPES SOAR:
Icemen

swum this race . . . It appears
that Michigan coach Gus Stager
has found his man for the dis-
tance events at the Nationals.

hold

off

Tigers

By BILL STIEG
1M1ICHIGAN'S hockey team, playing in "bits and spurts," held
off a die-hard Colorado College squad for a 5-4 victory last
night at Yost Ice Arena.
The win was the Wolverines' third straight WCHA triumph,
and, coupled with Minnesota-Duluth's loss to Michigan State,
it tied the Malze and Blue for sixth place with Duluth-another
boost towards the playoffs.
Things began well 'for Michigan. Just 1:35 into the contest,
the Tigers' Mike Hiefield was called for charging, the first of
the night's 17 penalties, including one misconduct. It took awhile
for the Wolverine power play to get going, but finally Don
Dufek steamed up the ice, bulled his way through two defenders,
and slid a perfect centering pass to a ready and waiting
Kris Manery. It took Manery a couple stabs at the puck to put
Michigan ahead, 1-0.
Michigan controlled play for the next ten minutes, getting
several scoring chances and at last capitalizing with a pair
of tallies. The first of these saw Manery putting on a great
one-man show, beating the defense but getting off a weak shot.
The rebound, however, was banged home immediately by a
hustling Randy Trudeau, following up the play.
Less than a minute later, big Angie Moretto continued his
scoring binge with a backhander from ten feet out, after Julian
Nixori's shot had been kicked away. Michigan was ahead now,
3-0, and it appeared they could 'probably sleepwalk the rest
of the way to a victory. Things did not work out that easily,
however, as Wolverine coach Dan Farrell pointed out: "We
started playing pretty loosely after that and they just pecked
away at US."

But back came the Tigers with a pair to narrow the gap
to 4-3. Their second goal came on a Michigan defensive lapse
of which Wayne Holmes took full advantage and their third
came on a power play slapshot that no Wolverine bothered
getting near. Now the visitors seemed to be in control.
EXCELLENT GOALTENDING by both Moore and Colorado's
Eddie Mio kept the scoring to a minimum in the last period.
Michigan scored at 12:53 on breakaway played to perfection
by Randy Neal and Doug Lindskog, with Lindskog getting the
goal.j
The Wolverines were back to a two goal lead, but the
Tigers kept plugging away. They couldn't get anywhere, how-
ever, until the last minute of play, when they pulled their goalie
for a three man advantage which even Moore couldn't handle.
Doug Palazzari got credit for the goal mouth tip-in, which
closed out the scoring.
"We played two good periods, but we just ran out of time.
We weren't ieady to play the first period," sighed Colorado
coach Jeff Sauer. "I thought Mio had his best night. Moore also
pleyed well. He's a showboat and a cocky little kid but he
does the job."
Farrell had praise for Kardos, Dufek, and Manery, but
added, "We started relaxing and taking things too easy. We're
going to have to have a much better effort Saturday night."
Crying in their Coors
FIRST PERIOD Moretto), 12:53; 9. CC -- Palazzari

BULLETIN
CORVALLIS, Ore. (A-, - Hot
outside shooting by Paul Miller
and four big free t h r o wv s by
freshman George Tucker carried
Oregon State to a 61-57 basket-
bhll upset over top-ranked UCLA
last night.

L
,
3<
t
7Y1
yjI J
t t
'
ff
1

Coach Stager was pleased with;
the results in the 200 butterfly as
Tom Szuba finished with a 1:56.871
time, 4 seconds off the Michigan
record. Szuba has not been swim-'
jming well so far this season and!
this effort was pleasing to see.,
Freshman Fred Yawger swam a
personal best of 1:58.64 to place
second.
Two other Michigan swimmers
turned in top individual perform-
ances. Dan Fishburn set a per-
sonal record in the 500 freestyle,
swimming it in 4:45.87, and fresh-
man Rob Helt splashed his way to
a 2:00.08 clocking in the 200 yd.
backstroke.
SCORES
WOHA
MsU 6, Minn-Duluth 2
Minnesota 7, Notre Dame 2
Michigan Tech 4, N. Dakota 1
STUDY IN
GUADALAJARA, MEXICO

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barbieri
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keith
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A WEEKLY LATE NIGHT
PRESENTATION OF
FEATURE FILMS
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
NIGHTS
ALL SEATS $1.50
THIS WEEK

"Fortune and Men's Eyes"
12:00 Midnight

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