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January 11, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-01-11

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THEGMICHIGAN DAILY

rage

1'000

Tanaka offers

Thais new

This Weekend

loan, demonstrations stop

AP Photo

A death in the family
A Cambodian cries as he holds his daughter, killed yesterday when Khmer Rouge insurgents shelled
Prek Phnau, eight miles north of Pnom Penh. Fighting has continued in this area for several days.
Gand ury probes Kent State

CLEVELAND, Ohio (P)-A fed-
eral grand jury probing the 1970
Kent State University shootings
questioned yesterday the man in
charge of the campus at the
start of demonstrations that led
to the shootings.
The panel also turned its atten-
tion to the students wounded in
the May 4, 1970 clash between
student demonstrators and the
Ohio National Guard in which
four students were killed. At least
three of the nine wounded were
called to testify.
DR. ROBERT MATSON, who
was in charge of Kent State when
student protests against U.S. in-
volvement in Cambodiabegan
several days before the violent
confrontation, spent about two
hours before the panel Thursday
afternoon.
He said he answered all the
jurors' questions, but he declined
to discuss them in detail, saying
his attorney had advised against
it.
"Kent State is a topic of great
sadness to me, and I'm never
happy to have to resurrect that
sadness," he added, "but If I
can serve the people by serving
the grand jury, I'll be happy to
do so."
Matson was vice president of
student affairs at the time of the
demonstrations and was standing
in for the president of the univer-
sity, who was at an educators'
conference.
MATSON SAID he hopes the
grand jury "can come out with a
complete story" from its investi-
gation.
"There have been too many
bits and pieces over the period of
years," he said. "I. don't think
any one person that was there
has the complete story."
Matson was one of those who
had attended a meeting at which
former Ohio governor James
Rhodes allegedly gave orders for
the National Guard to keep the
university open despite the dem-
onstrations.
Among those wounded who said
they were called to testify yes-
terday were John R. Cleary, 22,
of Scotia, N.Y., Donald S. Mac-
Kenzie, and Alan Canfora. All
said they were sent away without
a jury appearance and told to
return Friday.
Cleary, now a Kent State senior
in architecture, was wounded
twice in the chest, and spent 2 /
weeks recuperating in a nearby
Ravenna hospital. He said Thurs-
day he was headedfor' class
when he stopped about 110 feet
from the National Guardsmen to
watch the demonstration.

HE SAID he understood the
jury was trying to determine the
relative positions of the students
and the troops when the gunfire
erupted.
Asked whether he felt the
Guardsmen were in danger, a
matter other witnesses have said
they were questioned about by
the jury. Cleary said he saw no
such danger.
MacKenzie said he was about
730 feet from the troops and was

wounded while running away
from the flare-up. Canfora, who
was wounded in the right wrist,
said he was about 220 feet away
at the time.
Dr. Robert White, Kent State's
president at the time of the
demonstrations, flew back from
the educators' conference May 3,
1970, the day after a campus
building was burned during a
nighttime demonstration. White
testified Wednesday.

BANGKOK, Thailand (AP) - Jap-
anese Prime Minister Kakuei
Tanaka offered Thailand easier
loan terms yesterday but his ef-
forts to smooth anti-Japanese
feeling were only partly succe.s-
ful.
Sombat Thamrongtanyavoig,
secretary-general of the 400,000
member National Student Center,
said it is now up to the Thai
government to prevent Japanese
domination of the Thai economy
He said if the government fails,
"then we will have to do it
our own way. We might act
against every Japanese in Thai-
land. So far we have aimed our
demonstrations against officials,
against the Japanese Embassy
and the Japanese Trade Center.
The next act might be against
individual Japanese."
THE UNITED STATES also was
the target of a hostile demon-
stration Wednesday, but it did
not continue yesterday. More
than 4,000 students, professors
and others massed outside the
U.S. Embassy for two hours, de-
manding the expulsion of Ambas-
sador William Kintner and the
Central Intelligence Agency.
The demonstration was sparked
by the revelation last weekend
that an American CIA agent had
"sentPremier Sanya a fake letter
purporting to be from a Com-
munist insurgent leader offering
a cease-fire in exchange for au-
tonomy for rebellious areas in
northeast Thailand. Kintner, whoj
was attached to the CIA in Wash-
ington in 1950-52, said the agent
had been sent out of Thailand and
disciplined.
A student-professor group, Pe-
ple for Democracy, continued its
demand that the Thai govern-
ment expel the American CIA
from Thailand and Sanya said he
would consider the request.
The group also sent a tele-
itain into
sruption
raise their offer above the con-
troversial stage three limit.
GORMLEY BRUSHED aside ar-
guments that his union was be-
ing swayed by leftwingers anxious
to damage the government. "It
Is our job to get the best pos-
sible wages for miners, whatever
the political climateof t h i s
country," Gormley said.
Workers throughout Britain are
huddling in extra pullovers and
woolly underwear because of the
emergency restrictions on heat-
ing, but strippers in London's
Soho clubland have to carry on
naked - and they don't like it.
With street lights dimmed and
neon signs switched off, Soho is
not its bright, bustling self these
days, but in the clubs and top-
less bars it's "business as usual."
Stripper Candice Kelly of theI
Nell Gwynne Club, said: "There
are 25 girls here and I don't thinkk
one of us has escaped the flu
or a bad cold. Some of us are
even getting a twinge of rheuma-
tism."

gram in English addressed to
"The Speaker of the U.S. Sen-
ate" demanding the removal of
ambassador William Kintnar
"and immediate cessation rf CIA
activities and the U.S. military
presence in our country."
KINTNER had to cancel a
scheduled meeting with students
at the northern Chiang M a i
University after two days of de-
monstrations. The ambassador is
on a three-day orientation tour
of the far north of Thailand.
A joint communique issued af-
ter a meeting between Tanaka
and Thai Premier Sanya Tham-
masak said the leaders agreed
to soften the terms of yen loans
to Thailand but no figures were
given. Tanaka noted that interest
rates were lowered half a per
cent to 2.5 per cent in Novem-
ber.
Student leaders who talked with
Tanaka said they were not satis-
fied with his answers to their de-
mands that Japan take steps to
reduce a trade imbalance of
nearly $300 million a year and
reform its aid and inverment
practices in Thailand.
TANAKA said Thailand could
cut its Japanese trade deficit
nearly in half by increasing pro-
duction of rice, corn and sugar
for export to Japan.
l

"I hope the Thai people will
come to understand that the
Japanese are very hard-working
but they also can be very n i c e
fellows . . . and willing to cor-
rect our mistakes when we make
mistakes," Tanaka said.
Though there were no anti-
Japanese demonstrations sucn as
Wednesday's, signs reading
"Down with Japanese economic
imperialism" and "Jap get out"
were still posted around Bang-
kok as Tanaka wound up the se-
coed day of his visit with a re-
ception for the local JapaneseE
community.
Tanaka, his daughter Mrs. Ma-
kiko Tanaka and an entourage
of 29 depart today for Singapore.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 84
Friday, January 11, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
,764-0562. Second class postage paid at
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 May-
nard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104.
Subscription rates: $10 by carrier (cam-
pus area); $11 local mail (Michigan and
Ohio); $12 non-local mail (other states
and foreign).
Summer session publishea Tuesday'
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (Michigan and!
Ohio); $7.00 non-local mail 'other
states and foreign).

Barbara Streisand Ryan O'Neil
in Peter Bogdanovich's screwball comedy

What's Up, Doc?
7:00 FRIDAY 8:40 SATURDAY 10:20
Modern Languages Auditorium
-COMING-in January-
STEVE McQUEEN ALI McGRAW
FRI., SAT., Jan. 18-19

1 II

sThree
-;.

ISRAELI
DANCING
every SUNDAY
at 12:30 p.m.
with ZIPORAH TROPE
H I LLEL, 1429 Hill St.

in Sam Peckinpah's film
The Getaway
-AND-
GODARD
Friday, Jan. 25
WEEKEND
and the Rolling Stones in
Saturday, Jan. 26
Jane Fonda Yves Montond
Tout Va Bien
and Tom Hayden, Rip Tom
1pm.
with the Jefferson Airplane
the weekend film festival
friends of newsreel 769-7353

I

al, in
$1.25 cont.

Railroad strike plunees Bri
crisis as unions threaten di

LONDON - (Reuter) - Brit-
ish industry plunged still fur-
ther into crisis yesterday with
spreading rail stoppages and
threats of'a new disruption from
another key group of unions.
Within hours London became
almostberefit of trains. strand-
ing hundreds of thousands :)f
commuters. Servicetin other
areas was heavily cut.
As the labor situation worsen-
ed, prime minister Heath called
trade union workers to a surprise-
talk last night in an attempt to
discuss compromise proposals.
THE LATEST challenge to the
government's anti-inflation pro-
gram came from 21 unions in the
confederation of shipbuilding and
engineering unions.
Its leaders decided to order a
ban on overtime work as soon as
possible to back up the unions'
wage demands, which are about
four times higher than the of-
ficially permitted level.
Such a ban would spread dis-
ruption through the nation's shin-
yards and factories, most of
which are already on short-time
because of the fuel shortage
which has been worsened by a
similar overtime ban imposed
by coal miners.
THE CONFEDERATION'S de-
mand also appeared to spell doom
for a peace move made Wed-
nesday night by Len Murray,
general secretary of the Trades
Union Congress (T.U.C.), which
embraces some 10 million Brit-
ish workers.

He suggested the government
should make a special exception
in the case of the miners and
relax the pay curbs prescribed in
the current "stage three"' of the
anti-inflation code.'
In return, Murray said, t h e
T.U.C. would seek to dissuade
other unions from using the min-
ers' example as an argument to
advance their own demands.
The proposal was promptly re-
jected by Chancellor of the Ex-
chequer Anthony Barber. The
government has so far insisted
that any special treatment for
miners would bring a disastrous
, flood or other pay demands.
However, the government came,
under pressure Thursday to give
Murray's idea a second thought.
BUT THE demands from the
shipbuilding confederation seem-
ed to dash these hopes. Hugh
Scanlon, whose engineering un-
ion is the second biggest in Brit-
ain, said the demand would be
pressed no matter how the min-
ers fared.
Another militant union chief,
Clive Jenkins, said his White
Collar Workers Union would not
consider itself in any way bound
by a special deal for the miners.
Miners leaders met yesterd-iy
to discuss Wednesday's fruitless
talks with employment secretary
William Whitelaw. Union Presi-
dent Joe Gormley said I a t e r
it had been decided to engage in
no more discussions unless the
state-run mines were prepared to

IBOOK SALEI
40
ALL PAPERBACKS REDUCED 10-50%
ALL CLOTH BOOKS REDUCED 20-50%
EVERY BOOK IN THE STORE ON SALE
LIMITED TIME ONLY ALL SALES FINAL
OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY (13 volumes) was 300.00 now 239.95
DALI COOKBOOK.......................was 50.00 now 25.00
NICKEL MOUNTAIN
(John Gardner's newest novel) ..... . ......was 6.95 now 4.95
VICTOR VASARELY-PLANETARY FOLKLORE was 15.00 now 10.50
THE BARN ............................ was 25.00 now 20.00
PLAIN SPEAKING
(Harry Truman and Merle Miller) ..........was 8.95 now 7.16
THOUSANDS OF OTHER BARGAINS
NO REMAINDERS NO PUBLISHERS' OVERSTOCK
Centicore Bookshops
336 MYNARD only
,ems , ,, 0.

I NTRO-ACT31--Tracy Schwartz
Personal Growth Groups 1-3-Norman Blake
Weekly, one day, and 8-10-Michael Cooney
weekend groups: 11-Alice Seeger &
Hazel Kickens
peer counseling, separa- 15-16-Putnam String
tion and divorce, anger, Country Band w/
interpersonal skills, per- John Cohen,
sonal issues, 22-23-Bruce Philips
Leaders: RICHARD KEMPTER
MICHAEL ANDES
Theory & Techniques: Encounter TONITE-
Gestalt, Role-play, etc.
Fees: $7/session, $25/weekendH T50c
Orientations & Screening H O 0
Interview Required
call RICHARD 662-4826
MICHAEL 662-2801

i

CHORAL GROUP
Jewish Music-Secular & Sacred
First Organizational Meeting
Sunday, Jan. 13 at 1:30 at H illel
for info. contact ELLEN KATZ
769-9575 or H I LLEL 663-4129
1429 HILL ST.

AIR FORCE PARKAr
6 oz. fill-$19.99 (reg. $27.00)
8 oz. fill-$29.99 (reg. $40.00)
CANVAS PARKAS . .. from $25.00 (reg. $39.00)
NYLON PARKAS ....... .... $19.99 (reg. $30.00) j

The COMIC OPERA GUILD
presents
2 OPERETTASMZR'
MOZART'S
Bastion & Bastienne
W.S. GILBERT'S
AGES AGO
OPENING: Saturday, Pn.12, 8:00-$2.50

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
Miss J Coats
$48 to $98
Our entire collection of winter warmers
is now priced for exceptional savings!
Select from pantcoats and dressy coats
..fashionable wraps, jackets, trenches
and double breasted styles. . Shetland
and Melton wools, plushes, synthetics
and some with handsome fur trimmings.
5 to 13 sizes.

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Sorry, no phone or mail orders.

"~&JAW4

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