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February 15, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-15

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_ _.

ME

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 15, 1974

BALINESE PUPPET THEATER
Rackham Auditorium
FRIDAY, Feb. 15-8:OO p.m.
SADMISSION FREE
Sponsored by Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies

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February 18-19, 1974
Call for an appointment

Solzhenitsyn heads

for

LANGENBROICH, West Ger-
many (Reuter) - Exiled Soviet
writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn is
to travel to the Swiss City of Zur-
ich, today, his Swiss lawyer Fritz
Heeb said here last night.
In a brief statement to waiting
reporters here, Heeb u r g e d,
"Please respect Mr. Solzhenit-
syn's need for peace and quiet."
He refused to specify exactly
when the Russian novelist would
be leaving here or how he would
travel. He also refused to ans-
wer questions on the duration of
his stay in Switzerland.
SOLZHENITSYN, who is stay-
ing in this small village west of
Bonn as the guest of Heinrich
Boell, like himself a Nobel Prize-
winner, did not speak to report-
ers last night.
But earlier yesterday, a smil-
ing Solzhenitsyn autographed
copies of his latest book, "Gulag
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXIV, Number 114
Friday, February 15, 1974
is edited and managed by students at
the University of Michigan. News phone
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Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106. Published
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Archipelago," on the first day
of his exile in the West.
He was surrounded by more
than 50 reporters and onlookers
as he stepped out of Boell's
farmhouse where he has been
staying since being flown to West
Germany from Moscow Wednes-
day.
Meanwhile a group of Soviet
dissidents including physicist
Andrei Sakharov has signed a
document demanding that Solz
henitsyn be allowed to return to
Russia, a spokesman for the Ital-
ia magazine Panoroma said yes-
terday.
THE DOCUMENT, sent by Sak-
harov from Moscow, reached the
"magazine yesterday and will be
published next week, he said.
The signers declared that the
exiled author's alleged betray-
al consisted of "having revealed,
with disturbing force, monstrous
crimes committed in the Soviet
Union in the recent past."
They added that "tens of mil-
lions of innocent people" in Rus-
sia had fallen victims to terror
adorned with the name of "social
justice," the spokesman said.
THE DISSIDENTS demanded
that Solzhenitsyn "be given the
possibility of working in his
homeland" without persecution
and that "Gulag Archipelago" be
published in the Soviet Union.
They also called for the estab-
lishment of an international tri-
bunal to investigate crimes by
the Russian security services and

the publication of official files,
the spokesman said.
Other signatories included phy-
sicist Pavel Litvinov, engineer
and author Anatoly Marchenko,
Yuri Orlov, Yelena Bonner,
Vladimir Maximov and Melik
Agursky.
THE DOCUMENT reached the
Italian magazine through Maria
Olsufyena, Sakharov's transla-

Zurich
tor, the spokesman said.
In another development yes-
terday, a television reporter re-
vealed that according to Solzhen-
itsyn Soviet .police told him
after his arrest Tuesday that
they were charging him with
treason, an offense that carries
a maximum penalty of death in
the Soviet Union.

Researchers isolate
addiction-linkedcells

STANFORD, Calif. (W) - The
first isolation of the brain mole-
cules involved in drug addic-
tion was reported yesterday by a
Stanford Medical Center re-
search team working with mice.
"Eventually this discovery
could have enormous importance'
in dealing with narcotics addic-
tion," said Dr. Avram Gold-
stein, the team chief.
He said it also might allow de-
velopment of a nonaddictive pain
reliever.
THE NEW isolated substance,
extracted from mice brains, is
called an opiate receptor. Re-
ceptors are special molecules
into which drugs fit, like keys
in a lock, explained Goldstein,
a Stanford pharmacology profes-
sor.
"To understand addiction and
possibly develop new ways to
deal with it, the first thing you
have to do is to find the recep-
tors involved," he said.
The key for the Stanford-iso-
lated opiate receptor' is mor-.

phine, one of a chemical com-
pound class derived from opiun
and its relatives.
THE HEROIN taken by an ad-
dict is converted by thie body
into morphine, and niorphine
acts on nerve cells.
"In our work we studied
m o u s e brain fragments and
learned how to isolate and par-
tially purify a receptor molecule
that combines with -a narcotic
drug closely related to mor-
phine," Goldstein said.
"This receptor is a proteolipid,
a protein molecule with fatty
properties. It is found almost
exclusively in nervous system
tissue, as in the. brain or the
spinal chord," he said.
ASKED IF similar receptors
exist in the human brain; Gold-
stein said:;
"Very similar molecules are al-
most certainly involved in hu-
man narcotic addiction'.
Many of the effects of heroin and
morphinetare almost identical in
mice, rats and other mammals,
including man."~

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__

"LET US ENTERTAIN YOU..."
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tonight
Ken Kesey's
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Paul Newman
Henry Fonda
directed by
PAUL NEWMAN

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SOMETIMES
A GREAT
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Lee Remick
Michael Sorrozin
in color and Panvision
iy Feb. 15-16

Friday and Saturd

-duplexed-
Friday: Joseph Losey's
Assassination
of Trotsky
Richard Burton Alain Delon
Saturday: Arthur Penn's
Bonnie & Clyde
Faye Dunaway Warren Beatty
Michael J. Pollard

Arthur Penn's Bonnie and Clyde

BOTH FILMS EACH NIGHT AT

I

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