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February 13, 1974 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-13

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Wednesday, February 13, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pc Q'e Seven

Wedsll~ 9ned A , Fbur 3 94TEMCIA AL

Pneic GVrn

F

Upset
By ROGER ROSSITER
One short week ago Michigan'schances of
copping a Western Collegiate Hockey Asso-
ciation play-off berth looked mighty bleak.
Mired in ninth place, with the awesome
Michigan Tech Huskies heading for town, the
Blue dekers were faced with a seemingly im-
possible task.
JUST WHEN the season appeared to be
lost, the Wolverines pulled off a minor
miracle-a series sweep. Even after Friday
night's spine tingling, 5-4, overtime thriller,
Saturday's prospects looked grim at best. No
one would have blamed the Wolverines if
they had laid down and died. After all,
Michigan Tech is synonymous with college
hockey. Its program is so well coordinated
that it shames many professional organiza-
tions.

over

Tech

spark

Dekers

But the Wolverines came
carried the play to Tech
night, and "walked away
straight one goal victory, 4-3.

right back and
again Saturday
with a second

"This was the greatest thrill I've had in
hockey," grinned Michigan mentor Dan.
Farrell. "In my mind they are the best.
We beat them playing the style they like
best-a physical, checking game."
THAT the Wolverines did. They checked
the Huskies in Farrell's words "like they
have never been checked all year." They
held perhaps the finest player in college
hockey today,. Mike Zuke, goal-less which
was the first time that has been done all
year, also.
"I knew John (MacInnes) didn't want Zuke
out against (Don) Dufek. So, I purposely
held his line off until I could match them
up against Zuke's," Farrell explained.
The dividends were most evident Saturday
when Zuke was whistled off for taking a
cheap shot at a Wolverine moments after
Dufek laid him low with a solid bodycheck.
At that point the game stood deadlocked, 3-3,
but only five seconds later Don Fardig's
quick wristshot gave Michigan the lead and
the victory.

In case you had forgotten, Dufek was also
the man who slid home the overtime clincher
the evening before.
NO ONE player can be singled out as being
the key to the series. Robbie Moore, in goal,
Angie Moretto, Doug Lindskog and Rob
Palmer were also instrumental in the total
team effort.
The only sour note in an otherwise perfect
weekend came in the third period of Friday
night's contest when Frank Werner took a
blind side check and was felled with a broken
ankle. The fracture will cost the Wolverines
Werner's services for the rest of the season.
MICHIGAN'S play-off hope, which seemed
dashed after a double loss at Duluth, vaulted
to its highest peak since the opening WCHA
series three months ago.
"This series really brought back my con-
fidence, in that, I finally have gotten results
from the philosophy I've been preaching all
year," Farrell added. "I've been trying to
show these guys that by playing sound two
way hockey we can play with any team in the
league. This series we finally did that, and
my philosophy was right."
With three weeks left in the season, the
Wolverines find themselves in a three way
tie for seventh place with Colorado College
and Notre Dame. Appropriately, Michigan's
next two series are against, who else, Colo-
rado College and Notre Dame.
That situation allows the Wolverines to
control their own destiny. They'll get exactly
what they earn in the next three weekends.
IN CASE you are wondering about that
final season series, it is a home and away
set with arch-rival Michigan State, and it too
will have a special prize awaiting its out-
come-the Big Ten championship.
The Big Ten champion is determined by
those games played head to headamong the
four Big Ten members of the WCHA, Michi-
gan, Michigan State, .Minnesota, and Wiscon-
sin. Minnesota and Wisconsin completed their
Big Ten action last weekend by playing to
a pair of overtime ties in Madison. Both have
5-4-3 records in the Big Ten.

It I

The Wolverines stand at 5-4-1 which means
that a pair of wins or a win and a tie would
give the Maize and Blue their first Big Ten
championship since the 1968-69 campaign.
A split of the State series would not be good
enough, since the title is determined by win
percentage rather than points as in the
WCHA.
For a little excitement let's delve into the
possibilities for the upcoming weekend alone.
Assume Michigan sweeps Colorado College at
Yost and Notre Dame drops a pair at Min-
nesota. That in itself would lift the Wolverines
into seventh place with a four point cushion.
If the aforementioned should occur, the
Minnesota-Duluth at Michigan State series
would tell a long story. A sweep by the
Spartans would put Michigan in sixth place,
two points ahead of Duluth. A sweep by
Duluth would leave Michigan tied for sixth
with State, two points behind Duluth. If the
two teams should split, Michigan would be
tied for sixth with Duluth, only two points
behind idle Wisconsin.
SHOULD a tie be coupled with a Duluth
victory, a major logjam would occur with
Wisconsin in fourth place (25 points), Duluth
and MSU tied for fifth (24 points), and
Michigan alone in seventh (23 points). All
very interesting, to say the least.
- The twin victories over Tech have very
definitely opened the door for the Wolverines.
If they continue to play the inspired hockey
they played against the Huskies, a fifth
place finish could be within grasp.
However, a return to the doldrums that
plagued their weekend in Duluth would knock
them right out of the play-off picture, at least
for another year.
Farrell has always been associated with
winners, both in his playing and assistant
coaching days at Tech: His first year at the
Michigan helm can be termed successful now
if for no other reason than the victories over
Tech. But, winners don't quit with the first
taste of success, and neither Farrell nor any
of the Wolverine skaters intend to quit now.

"A multi-film and dance presentation utilizing
tapes from the original production in quadro-
phonic sound synchronized with 10 projectors."
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15
8:00 P.M.
ST. MARY'S CHAPEL
(corner of William and Thompson)
SPONSORED BY THE JERUSALEM GROUP
663-0557

Doily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
MICHIGAN'S GARY KARDOS gives the cold shoulder to a
grimacing MichiganTech player in action at Yost Ice Arena this
past Saturday. It was checking like this that allowed the Wolver-
ines to sweep the highly-rated Huskies.

NBA~
Detroit 113, Kansas City-Omaha 106
Chicago 93, Milw~aukee 81
New York 100, Buffalo 93
Capital 107, Cleveland 99

Sports of The Daily

LE CLERC STARS:
Gymnasts flip State

All 12iI
4 u$2.

--
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
CITY CENTER ACTING COMPANY
JOHN HOUSEMAN, Artistic Director
"An outstanding theatre group"-Knickerbocker News
"Well knit unit of young and proficient players"-Doily
"Outstanding performances"-The New York Times
"Absolutely sparkling"-Cue
presenting John Gay's
THE BEGGAR'S OPERA
Feb. 14-15 at 8/ Feb. 16 at 3
and William Shakespeare's
MEASURE FOR MEASURE
Feb. 16 at88/ Feb. 1 7at 3f&8
Mendelssohn Theatre
TICKETS: PTP Ticket Office, Mendelssohn Lobby
764-0450

Special To The Daily

Buckner honored
Quinn Buckner, Indiana's brilliant playmaker, has
named ;the Big Ten's basketball Player of the Week by
Associated Press.
Buckner, who usually isn't among the high scorers in
league, nevertheless, led the Hoosiers with ,17 points. But
important, he grabbed five rebounds and was credited
nine assists.
"Quinn really controlled our game," said Indiana C
Bobby Knight. "He got rebounds, steals, baskets . . . he
a lot of things."
Michigan's Campy Russell was nominated for the award
* * *
Tribe trades Chico
ARLINGTON, Tex.-Leo "Chico" Cardenas, veteran infi
who won Golden Glove awards for his defensive play bo
the National and American Leagues, was acquired by the T
Rangers from the Cleveland Indians yesterday for catcher
Suarez.
Cardenas, 35, has a .257 life-time batting average in 14y
in the major leagues. He established an American League re
for shortstops in 1971 with a .985 fielding average, breaki
record held by Phil Rizzuto, formerly of the New York Yan
Suarez, 30, batted .248 for the Rangers last year.
emmensae..........me 4

been
y the
n the
more
with
Coach
eran
J.

EAST LANSING-The Michigan
gymnastics squad tumbled to an
expeoted triumph over Michigan
State here last night by the score
of 159.3-149.0.
In spite of the convincing
triumph Coach Newt Loken was
not overly pleased with the
squad's performance. "I'm hap-
py about the victory but score-
wise we just couldn't get 'it all
together," the veteran mentor
stated, adding, "But we'll do
better against Iowa this Satur-
day."
Pierre LeClerc was Michigan's
mn"o* st - idA. n fn 1

anily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BRIAN DEMING
that event was Wolverine J. P.
Bouchard with 9.0.
"Sakamoto was terrific on the
floor exercise," enthused Loken
after the specialist awed the
partisan East Lansing crowd with
his performance.
In the pommel horse Michi-
gan's Jerome Poynton and Ru-
pert Hansen tied for honors with
a 9.0 score. MSU's Wade Wright
was third with 8.35.
Monty Falb had honors on the
rings with 9.15 followed by Le-
Clerc with 9.05 and Joe Neuen-
swander with 9.0, making the
event a clean sweep for the
Wolverines.
Jean Gagnon triumphed in the

ThelT
1. 'UCLA 49
2. No. Car. St.
3. Notre fDame 1
4. North Carolina
5. Vanderbilt
6. Maryland
7. Pittsburgh
8. Alabama
9. Marquette
10. Long Beach St.
11. Providence
12. tie Indiana
tie Daily Libels
13. Southern Cal.
14. South Carolina
15. MICHIGAN
16. Kansas
17. Creighton
18. Louisville
19. Utah
20. Arizona

rop

20
17-1
17.1
18-1
17-2
18-1

998
$93
79'7
$42
576

Cage

j

sww*..X"W-.,*V...i ;lx , l-B , le-11,51, 7,-V.l *;;e.$

15-4 431 By MICHAEL WILS(
19-1 386
16-3 331 At long last, the Big Ten
18-3 302 has a team in first plac
18-2 299 the first time in a long
18-3 256
14-3 215 single team is out front by
18-0 215 Michigan with its close
163 146 over Northwestern, has
16-3 134
15-3 76 lished itself alone at the
15-4 57 the conference.
15-4 40 So what if the lead is byi
16-5 25 percentage point or tw
15-5 17 problem now is maintaini
:s ." lead, and a tough roa
ahead for Johnny Orr's c
ngs The biggest test will con
T Pts. Saturday, when Michigan
2 32 travel to Bloomington to t
2 30 Bob Knight's revenge-:
4 26 Hoosiers.
5 25 Since its opening loss to
1 23 gan, Indiana has establis
1 21 self as the team to beat
1 19 Big Ten. The Hoosiers' sol
1 1 19 tory over Wisconsin on th
1 19 ger's home court Monday
1 15 shows what they can do.

Ul~b vnsaningperformer. -v
real pleased with LeClerc's fine
all-around score," Loken noted
elder in reference to the tumbler's 50.6
th in winning score in the all-around.
Texas The dependable LeClerc picked
Ken up second places on the rings
and in the vaulting event while
years winning the parallel bars on his
ecord way to winning all-around honors.
ng a Michigan was first in each
kees. event leading off with a winning
9.15 effort by Randy Sakamoto
in the floor exercise. Second in
r olead I
)N "I never thought they (Indiana)
finally would come away like that,"
e. For commented Orr.
time a But if Indiana has the one
y itself. thing going for them that no
victory other team does, it's the sched-
estab- ule. Indiana will play the weak-
top of er teams on its schedule (Illinois,
Minnesota, and Ohio State) on
a mere the road and has Michigan,
o. The Michigan State, and Purdue all
ing the at home in the remaining weeks.
d lies "It makes a lot of difference
agers. when you're on the road," said
me this Orr. "People don't realize this
must but its tough to play on the road."
ake on When asked about the Iowa-
minded Purdue game, Orr commented,
"I thought it was tremendous.
Michi- It's a good example of what
hed it- playing at home can do. Purdue
in- the will kill Iowa at home," Orr
lid vic- added in reference to February
e Bad- 18, -when Iowa must journey to
night Purdue.
Michigan State, minus top

gig

scorer Mike Robinson, managed
to squeak by Ohio State playing
without Bill Andreas in overtime
Monday night down in Columbus.
The victory enabled the Spar-
tans to remain one game back of
the league-leading Wolverines.
State, like Michigan, must
play Indiana in Bloomington.
Big Ten Standings

Ten

vaulting event with a 9.2. He was
trailed by LeClerc with a 9.05
score.
Wolverines Rich Bigras and
the everpresent LeClerc tied for
the win on the parallel bars with
matching scores of 9.0.
Carey Culbertson took the high
bar event, followed closely by
Spartan Paul Hime, 9.05.
In the all-around score it was
a clean sweep for the Wolverines
in the first three places with
LeClerc, Bruce Medd, and Gag-
non coming in one-two-three.
The victory gives Loken's crew
an unblemished 5-0 record thus
far.
The tumblers will put their per-
fect record on the line this Sat-
urday when they take on the
Iowa Hawkeyes at Iowa City.
After the Iowa encounter the
Maize and Blue entertain Penn
State in Ann Arbor Feb. 25. The
Big Ten Championships take
place on March 8 and 9 at Iowa
and the season for the gymnas-
tics men culminates with the
NCAA Meet at University Park,
Pa., on April 4, 5, and 6.
race
The Spartans will travel to Wis-
consin March 9, and have Min-
nesota, Northwestern, and Mich-
igan at home for the remainder
of the season.
The big news was the upset of
Purdue by the lowly Iowa Hawk-
eyes. This game dropped Purdue
into a tie with Michigan State,
sporting 7-2 records.
Purdue now faces a real up-
hill battle. The Boilermakers
must facethe two top teams in
the Big Ten (Michigan and In-
diana) on their own court. Fred
Schaus' cagers will play host
to Iowa and Illinois to round out
the schedule.

r -- m m- ---- -- - -
$t
I
t y
1 I
Stogether and head
for the snow-cov-
ered hills of Michigan --
S on the Northern Ex- .
onlycosts 2round
trip for adults, $6 for'-
children. It's a great way
to save gas and have a lot.E
I of fun doing it. Reservations;-
only. Call the number .-
eoworyourloca I -
' travel agent today!
I- I
I* I
r 1 T.
"-I rc m 1 P1nI r afi

WCHA S
Michigan Tech
Denver
Minnesota
Wisconsin
Michigan State
Minn..Puluth
MICHIGAN
Colorado College
Notre Dame
North Dakota

tandi
W L
15 5
14 10
11 7
10 9
11 12
10 11
9 12
9 12
9 12
7 15

Conference
W L
MICHIGAN 8 1
Indiana 7 1
Purdue 7 2
Mich. State 7 2
Wisconsin 4 4
Minnesota 4 5
Iowa 2 6
Northwestern 2 7
Illinois 1 7
Ohio State 1 8

All Games
W L
16 3
15 3
14 7
12 7
12 6
10 9
5 13
8 11
4 13
6 13

GEO Meeting
RA's, SA's, Graders
and all other non-TF
academic employees

smomm"M

SOVIET JEWRY WEEK

I
I
I
i
I

Wed. 8 P.M.:
Feb. 13

Two documentary films on the
contemporary state of Russian Jews
"THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING"
the story of absorption and settlement
in Israel of Russian Immigrants

GRADUATE STUD

ENTS WELCOME!

AGENDA WILL INCLUDE DISCUSSION
OF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:
1. How should we go about organizing SA's, RA's and other
non-teaching Fellow academic employees?
2. Do these employees want to loin the general GEO scenario
for activity: a contract deadline set for midnight Feb. 17
and a strike vote Feb. 18 and 19? If so, organizing must
intensify immediately.
3. What demands should be included in a bargaining package
relatina to the soecific needs of these emnlvees? Shniid

GRAD
COFFEE
I-Ai IQ

"LET MY PEOPLE GO"
Life in Russia and the imoact

itw i7bL1

I

t

J

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