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February 13, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-13

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pag Fiv

PaaeFiv

Groucho
on specia

AP Photo

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (1P)
Groucho Marx responded senti-
mentally to news that he would
be awarded a special Oscar at
at the Motion Picture Academy
awards April 2.
"I only wish that Harpo and
Chico could be here to share it,"
the comedian said. Then he add-
ed reflectively, "No-if only
Minnie were here."
Minnie Marx was the legend-
ary matriarch of the performing
family and Groucho remarked,
"None of us would have amount-
ed to anything if it hadn't been
for her. -
"What a woman she was! She
said that Sam, her husband,
could cough all night and she
wouldn't wake up. But if one
of her sons coughed just once,
she was awake immediately."
The Academy Board of Gov-
ernors this week voted Marx the
award for "His brilliant crea-
tivity and for the unequalled
achievements of the Marx Bro-
thers in the art of motion pic-
ture comedy."
Will Groucho appear at the
Los Angeles Music Center to
claim the Oscar?
"Certainly," he said. "Unless
they just want to shove it under
the door."
Groucho is the remaining
member of the zany trio whose
comedies of the 1930s are cher-
ished by each new generation.

Two other brothers;
Zeppo, who played th
interest in the early
Gummo, who manage
At 83, Groucho has
ily slowed his pace. H
deliberate, the quips
rapidly. But he is st
of raffish comments.
Last Tango in Paris, b
because Marlon Bran
love to that girl an

reflec ts
1 Oscar
are alive: Family, Maude, and Sanford
e romantic and Son, and he follows the
films, and news. He is admittedly enjoying
d the team. the problems of Richard Nixon,
necessar- a long-time hate.
His walk is Will Groucho perform again?
come less "If you mean concerts like the
ill capable ones I did last year - no. I'll
He liked do the Merv Griffin Show and
ut objected I'll appear with Johnny Carson
ndo "made if he would tape in the after-
d kept his noon. My doctor doesn't want me

THURSDAY on WCBN
HEAR THE
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plus interview with the
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Groucho liked 'Last Tango in Paris,'
but objected because Marlon Bran-
do "made love to that girl and kept
his overcoat on."
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.3 A."AAA.A..7 A.. . .A..ANA.AAAOA . . . . . . . .
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Griouicho Miarx

NOSTALGIA QU1IIZA
Let it never be said that The Daily provides the
reader only with what is relevant. Herewith is a quiz
that will send you scampering off to the graduate li-
brary microfilm collection of yesteryear's comics.
1. What was the name of Tillie the Toiler's pint-
sized boyfriend?
2. Everybody remembers little Orphan Annie's
Dog--but what was the name of Popeye's mutt?
3. Who was the big lout with the chef's hat that
fixed Wimpy's Hamburgers?
4. What was the nickname of Blondie and Dag-
wood's first-born, Alexander?
5Who were Flash Gordon's usual companions on
his forays to Mongo?
Jot down your answers and mail them to Nostal-
gia Quiz, c/o The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. An irrelevant record will be
awarded to the earliest and most correct set of ans-
wers. Answers and name of winner will appear in next
Wednesday's Arts page.}
Ypsi dinnershow
is fun on the hoof

overcoat on."
He is continuing his long-time
warfare with inattentive waiters.
He recently demanded faster
service at a hotel where he has
been eating for 40 years. "I only
have two hands," the waiter
snapped.
"Did you ever see anybody
with three hands?" Groucho re-
plied.
The comedian spends much of
his time at his Beverly Hills
home. He reads a great deal and
is enjoying a new book about his
idol, Harry Truman. He watches
television, especially All in the

to stay up till 2 a.m."
He leads an active social life,
often going to film previews. He
went to the home of Playboy
Hugh Hefner to watch the Mu-
hammad Ali-Joe Frazier fight
"They're both washed up -they'd
get licked by Foreman."
Even without performing,
Groucho earns a handsome in-
come. His manager, red-haired
Erin Fleming, whom Groucho
describes as "the woman I
love," reports that he collected
$250,000 in 1973 from endorse-
ments, record albums, merchan-
dise and other sources.

The MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE of
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
present;
BLACK SABBATH
and
BEDLAM
IN CONCERT
Saturday, Feb. 23, 1974-8 p.m.
at
BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
TICKETS: S6 reserved
$5, $4 general admission
Available at: McKenny Union, Huckleberry Party
Stare, Ann Arbor M u s i c Mart, J.L. Hudson's,
Grinnells
FIFI4FIFUNIYL....
210 S. FIFTH AVE.
ANN ARBOR
761-9700

M ahavishn a

Orchestra

recording comes alive

By MARNIE HEYN
Dinner theatre is a phenome-
non that is just old enough to be
a new craze.
The social custom of gathering
at an inn or on a picnic to enjoy
a spot-of play-acting or music-
either in Western or Oriental
cultures - is literally as old as
writing. But, in the American
Way, entrepreneursand gossip
columnists have discovered that
eating a meal and then watch-
ing actors hoof around where
the chicken croquettes once
stood is good fun - and good
business.
The Ypsilanti Players are pre-
senting Catch Me If You Can at
the Huron Hotel and Lounge on
Washington1Street in Ypsilanti
February 13-17, dinner theatre
style.
What more can I say?
Well, the meal was nourishing,
well-balanced, and colorful, if
not exciting - in the manner of
pot lucks, but with more pars-
ley. The roast beef was over-
done, and there was too much
onion in the potato salad.
On the other hand, the per-
formance was outstanding.
Catch Me If You Can is an
ideal selection for small-scale,
intimate production. It has one
homey set, a small, versatile
cast, and, the kind of dialogue
and plot that are no impediment
to digestion. Heavy issues or
heavy - handed gore would be a
bit much on top of the heavy
mashed potatoes.
Director Lynn H]]I has de-

veloped an excellent conception
of the play, using minimal and
convincing sound effects, and
lighting with only two positions
-on and off-to good advantage.
A senior drama major at East-
ern, she already has an impres-
sive list of acting and directing
credits, and she's done a thor-
oughly professional job. She says
that she's "proud to be the first
woman director to work for the
reincorporated Players."
The acting is competent, well-
timed, and fun. Bill Hay is con-
vincing as the hot-tempered ad
man who likes Stravinsky. Thom
Van Aken is delightful as the Co-
lumbo-style Catskills cop, but his
accent is unidentifiable. Blake
Fenn Walton does a good job of
imitating an imitation priest -
alcoholic-who's happy to find
"a Catholic in the Catskills.''
And Gaye Frances Harvell man-
ages a complex role very grace-
fully. Alan Preston is a lot of
fun as Stanley the Sandwich
Man, who feeds stuffed deer.
The supporting players and
technical staff have all clearly
done their homework. As a
whole the production is fast-
paced, action - packed, snappy,
and fun. Catch it if you can.
One word of advice: head for
the Huron Hotel on Wednesday
or Thursday nights. There's no
dinner, but the tickets are only
two bucks (rather than seven)
and the beer is reasonably pric-
ed.
You can always eat at Pizza
Bob's.

By BOB SCHETTER
The test of any live recording is not only in
how the record sounds, but also how much it
captures the moment of performance. The new
Mahavisnu Orchestra's live album, Between Noth-
ingness and Eternity (Col. KC32766), fares well in
this regard.
But don't let this review bias your judgement.
Use the following description of the Mahavisnu
performance, at which I was present, to judge the
album for yourself.
A midsummer night in Central Park. The path
leading past the Zoo cages to Wolman Skating Rink
seems unusually lush with moist, green foilage. It
feels very good to get away from the New York
City soot, and the expectancy of seeing a live
Rock concert quickens the adrenalin flow. Before
you know it, the crowd has grown around you and
you are at the Rink.
This night John McLoughlin and the Mahavisnu
Orchestra will play the Schaefer Music Festival.
Finally, inside the Rink, the familiar Mahavisnu
gongs sound and John comes on stage. Bowing to
the audience, as is his custom, he picks up his
double-necked guitar and the band starts to play.
The music blends extremely well with the tone
of the evening. One never really senses any par-
ticular form to the music. It is, and then is gone,
leaving in its wake a sensation of pleasure. And
all that is alive seems to feel the beauty and
rightness of those sounds created by the Maha-
visnu Orchestra. Trees bend to pick up a few
notes and one Zoo bear even grunted his approval
when asked how he liked the concert.
The evening passes and the Mahavisnu's music
ends, leaving the audience to cheer. This brings on
an encore, as usual. However, the crowd is in for

a treat, as the band plays for twenty minutes
more, with each member contributing very fine
extended solos before the end of the night.
But then, the band leaves, the lights go out, and
the spell is broken. The people go home, more then
satisfied.
We turn now to the album. Between Nothingness
and Eternity is a fine representation of the con-
concert. All selections are new and are generally
the performance's standouts, even though older
material was presented at the concert. The music
is much more forceful and energetic then in the
more refined studio recordings, and this is to its
credit since the musical quality of the evening
is captured. Additionally, recorded echoes and
cheering help to include the listener in the per-
formance.
The album's songs are in the typical Mahavisnu
style. Musical . textures are highlighted, ranging
from tranquil to raunchy, and the basis of the
music are ostinato patterns of repeated melodies
upon which extensive improvisation is placed. The
remarkable thing is that the sudden, but well-
timed, shifts of rhythm and texture which occur
on the studio albums, sound even more "tight" on
the live album. This points to the supreme pro-
fessionalism and proficiency of the band.
But there are flaws in the album. Too infre-
quently, the violin solos of Jerry Goodman are
lost behind the constant playing of John Mc-
loughlin. Also, the drum solos of Billy Cobham
are not even included on the album. This absence
doesn't hurt the music any, but it does leave out
an important part of the actual show.
Still, capturing the very essence of a concert is
extremelv difficult. And in this very fine record-
ing. a side of the Mahavisnu Orchestra is revealed
which is rarely heard anywhere else.

231 S. State * Dial 662-6264
Open Daily 12:45
Shows at 1,3,5, 7 &9 p.m.
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