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February 12, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1974-02-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Page Five

Womej
the
By BETH NiSSFN
The "Women in the R e el
World" Free Film Festival ended
Sunday, having successfully
shown women's film offerings to
enthusiastic, largely female
crowds.
The selection of films shown
established women as viable con-
tenders for recognition in t h e
film world.
Talent with a camera seems
more related to individual crea-
tivity than to the sex of the
came raperson. The films offer
ed were produced, directed and
written by women, and gave both
applaudable and disappontng
results.
The "chick's flicks" as o ne

finally enter

Teel
cynical chauvinist referred to
1 them, dealt with subjects a lio-
eration, lesbianism and life as a
woman, and gave a techBicolor
nod to the idea that it is good
to be what you are and oetter to
become what you can be.
Jan Oxenberg's Home Movie
documented the development of a
lesbian from home movie scenes
of her mirror-imitations of her
mother to her position as tacxle
on a Sunday-in-the-park, all fe-
male football team. The film is
faulty, especially in its final
scenes, where rough tackles are
shown as the epitome of libera-
tion. The film insists on using a
male scale to chart female free-
dom.

Oboeist performs
with Ars Musica

By MICHAEL FOLEY
Playing their authentic Baro-
que instruments, gut strings and
all, the locally based Ars Musica
under the direction of Lyndon
Lawless performed Sunday night
at St. Clare Episcopal Church
before a full house of Baroque
lovers. Those who came to hear
authentically-played B a r o q u e
were not disappointed.
Performing with Ars Musica on
Baroque oboe was Bruce Haynes.
Recognized as one of Europe's
top Baroque oboeists, Mr. flaynes
comes to Ann Arbor from Am-
sterdam where he is currently
teaching Baroque oboe and instri-
ment making at the Royal Con-
servatory. Mr. Haynes' o b o 0
d'amore is a copy of an authentic
Baroque oboe d'amore. The oboe
d'amore differs from the regular
oboe in that it is keyed in A ra-
ther than in C.
The program began with a
piece by my personal favorite,
G. P. Telemann, 4th Quartet
from 'Nouveaux Quatuors.' This
intricate piece of several move-
ments represents the typical late
Baroque style that was Tele-
mann's as well. The many com-
plex passages of this piece were,
1 felt, extremely well negotiat-
ed by all in the ensemble.
With Bruce Haynes on oboe,
Ars Miusica played a piece by
J. S. Bach entitled Concerto in
A Major. Originally written for
harpsichord, the piece was trans-
cribed for oboe d'amore. The
modification went very well with
the exception of the third move-
ment. Needless to say, one could
find no fault in the execution of
the piece. The low range of the
oboe d'amore in this particular
selection gave it a tone quality
such as that of the English horn.
Following the intermission, the
ensemble played a piece by Ales-
sandro Marcello, Concerto in D
Minor. To demonstrate the dif-

ference in ornamentation between
Marcello and Bach, Haynes sub-
stituted a Bach ornamentation of
the second movement. The con-
trast between the simplicity of
the 'basso continuo' of Marcello
and the intricacy of Bach w a s
quite evident.
To cover the early Baroque era
in its program, the ensemble
G. P. Cima's Trio Sonata in A.
Since this entailed "turning the
clock back 110 years", changes
in tuning were made to achieve
greater originality. The relative
simplicity of this piece as com-
pared to J. S. Bach was repre-
sentative of the earlier oeriod.
Range and intricacy were less.:n-
ed in this beautiful. 17th century
piece.
The final selection, by Carlo
Farina, also came from the early
years of the Baroque era.. The
format of the piece is a c )m-
edy in music. The ensemble, y
employing curious techniques
such as ponticello, glissardo and
hitting the strings with the wood
of the bow, imitated sound, o?
animals such as cats and dogs
along with more subtle musical
humour in the form of constant
repetition and comical blunders.
The unusual piece ended w i t h"
the group mimicking mnusicians
fading away in the distance while
the lights, one at a time, were
turned out!
DIAL 668-6416
1214 S. UNIVERSITY
Sat., Sun., & Wed. Promptly
at 1, 3, 5, 7, & 9 p.m.
Thur. & Fri. at 7 & 9 only
9L c

orid'
Bette Gordon's Go. Go. was
one of the most disappointing
offerings. The film folldws a
young girl applying for the posi-
tion of go-go dancer in a topless-
bottomless bar. The girl repeats
again and again her hatred of
exploitation and the fact that she
doesn't really need the money
that badly; it's never clear why
she's applying' for the job in the
first place.
A five-minute four-way coa-
versation is as muddled and un-
decipherable as the point of the
film. Even if Go. Go. can he
forgiven its technical sins, the
film still graphically exploits the
exploited by showing more gv-
rating flesh than recognizable
merit.
Jeanne Youngson's Post-Op
Transexual left the audience si-
lent. Austin Vincent Hartin nar-
rates the story of his own ment-
al, physical and legal change
into Deborah Hartin. Footage of
a bewigged Hartin in pastel
dresses is tiresomely abundant,
but the soundtrack describing a
life trapped into the w r o n g
body is depressingly unsettling.
Welcome to the Beltless, Pin-
less, Fussless Generation w a s
one of the brighter films. A col-
lage of ads and stills showing
women a big-busted, spande-
girdled pleasure-givers flashed
by with machine gun rapidity. It
brought similar rounds of ap-
plause.
One of the most effective, en-
tertaining and illustrative films
was Martha Haslange s Your
Home is You.
Bright color pictures of decor-
ator rooms and arranged food
made a filmed mockery of the
House Beautiful/ Bette Homes
and Gardens feminine ima e. A
honey-voiced announced advised
women to spend an evening with-
paint chips and color charts and
urged womankind to accept the
challenges of a career in home
making.
The film was outrageously fun-
ny, with skilled mixing of dream
hoise rooms with tiger rugs, nif-
ty garnishes for graperuit and
violins accompanying the assur-
ance that "Women do have the
instincts for domesticit r."
Using these films alone as
evidence, women have the in-
stincts for sharp, creative use
of the film medium as well.
THE SEXUA LIST
art&CINEMA
-; I

THURSDAY, February 14, 1974-4 p.m.
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
(Frieze Bldg. at the corner of State and Huron)
ADMISSION FREE
The MAJOR EVENTS COMMITTEE of
EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
presents
BLACK SABBATH
and
BEDLAM
IN CONCERT
Saturday, Feb. 23, 1974-8 p.m.
at
BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
TICKETS: $6 reserved
$5, $4 general admission
Available at: McKenny Union, Huckleberry Party
Store, Ann Arbor M u s i c Mart, J.L. Hudson's,
Grinnelis
--
BACH
B MINOR MASS
U. of M. Chamber Choir and Orchestra
THOMAS HILBISH, Conductor
FRIDAY, FEB. 15-8:00 P.M.

THE PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
INVITES YOU TO AN
Informal Discussion Lecture
WITH
JOHN HOUSEMAN
auseman is artistic director .
City Center Acting Com w .
star of the current film
Pn r iChn d nnwr

Mr. H
of the
parny,
' h

ne raper-n ase, an awara-
winning television and radio anc
film producer, and author of Run
Through, A Memoir.

Residential College Players
perform Albee and Shaw

By MICHELE BECKER
The Residential Coege Players
performed two short plays last
weekend, George Bernard Shaw's
Dark Lady of the Sonnets direct.
ed by Robert Rose and Edward
Albee's The-Sandbox directed by
Louis Gudema.
The R.C. players appeared to
have an understanding of Shaw's
wit, but they were lrifortunately
unable to bring across the humor
to the audience.
Shaw's humor can be very sub-
tle and to be performed effec-
tively it must be clear v and con-
sistently execu.ted. Shakespeare,
Wendell Jones, was portrayed as
an offhand, glib character. As a
result much of Shaw's humor was
lost in rapid speech and faulty
timing. Some humorous moments
existed when Shakespeare wrote
down the eloquent statemeal-s of
those he cane in contact wic in-
to his little notebook to be used
for one of his later plays or son-
nets.
The second play of the evening
was The Sandbox. The mood was
captured and the pacing was wel.

defined, but the ptav as a who]
lacked the feeling of complete-
ness. It seemed like a work i,
progress, rather than a comauete
piece.
The play has four characte.%
plus a musician, Ralph Katz,
whose music added much to the
total effect ;f The Sandbox.'
Mommy and Daddy have broughit
Grandma to her final resting
place in The Sandbox. And while
Mommy and Daddy wait for the
"offstage rumble" to show that
Grandma's time has come,
Grandma divides her attention
between talking to the audience,
making cracks at Mommy and
Daddy and admiring the young
man's muscles.
Good performances were given
by Carlos Rodriques, as the
young man and Kevin Cowoer :s
Daddy. The characte-ization of
Grandma, Leora Manischev t?
and Mommy, Lucy Bjorklund,
presented some problems. Grand-
ma in Albee's plays is always a
sharp character. Her wit is keen
and biting. Grandma was played
too young, she lacked the wisdom

that Grandma has ac-ianvimdated
in her 86 years. However, this is
a very difficult role and it was
attacked from the right direction.
Mommy was also headed in the
right direction, but her character-
ization didn't get f lr beyond a
surface understanding.
The production of The Sandbox
left the audience entertained, but
not thoroughly satisfied.
Both the sets and lighting work-
ed well for both shows and cos-
tumes, designed by Beth Rontal, a
were well suited and added much
to the shows visually.l

RESERVED SEATS
Main Floor and 1st Balcony
(Middle sections)
Side Sections Main Floor
and 1 st Balcony
2nd Balcony

$3.00
$2.50
$1.50

Students
$2.00
$1.50
$1.00

MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED THROUGH FEBRUARY 11
Make checks payable: U. of M. Chamber Choir
Return order to: U. of M. Chamber Choir
School of Music
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, Mhi'an 48105
FOR INFORMATION CALL 764-7592
-
GET TICKETS NOW
NAMEI
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE -______________
NUMBER OF TICKETS
Please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope

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